(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Monticola"

THE MONTICOLA 



VOLU/Vlti .XIII 



THE BOOK OF THE JUNIOR CLASS OF WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 







»'^ 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/monticola13west 




Ul^ '<^(l^ '<lc- 



Q M 1 1 T I n Q 




To all men everywhere who have e\er known 

Or shall ever know the love we l)ear for West \'ir^-inia. 

The Juni(n- Class, in her name, jiresents this Book. 

We bring- to you the record of one year 

From out the life of West X'irginia. Herein 

Are gathered up some facts and fancies 

Of this college year. May they, in days to come, 

When we are scattered far and each has gone 

His devious way. and only memories remain. 

Bring l)ack remembrance of our Alma Mater, 

Dear West Xir^inia, and of each other. 



©ebication. 

' {J^L IN keeping witl 
■4qi\\ cate this volui 



N keeping with long established custom we dedi- 
tme to one worthy of the best work 
[^ of our head and hands and hearts. As with one 
mind, it is agreed that such a one is that na- 
tive born son of West Virginia whose private 
life and public service have proved him to be of the 
highest and best type of American manhood. 

WILLIAM PALLISTER HUBBARD. 

— The Junior Class, 




l^illiam laUister l^ubfaarb. 



>,R HUBBARD was born at Wheeling, Ohio 
County, West Virginia (then Virginia) on 
December 24, 1843; ^^d his entire Hfe has 
been spent there. He was educated in the 
public schools of Wheeling, at Linsly In- 
stitute, that city, and at Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, at Middletown, Connecticut, from which he 
graduated in 1863. 

In 1864 he was admitted to the bar, and for nearly 
a half century has practiced his profession, winning 
for himself the distinction of being one of the foremost 
lawyers of the state and ranking with the best to be 
found anywhere.. 

In 1865 young Hubbard, while yet only 2i, en- 
listed in the Union Army and served till the end of 
the war. 

He was chosen clerk of the West Virginia House 
of Delegates in 1866, and served in thai capacity until 
1870. 

From 1870 to 1880 his time was largely spent in 
caring for and looking after his large law practice, and 
already he was recognized as one of the l:)rainy lawyers 
of the Wheeling bar. 

He was elected a member of the House of Delegates 
from Ohio county in 1880 and served one term. 

In 1888 he was a delegate from West \*irginia to 
the National Republican convention, which convention 
nominated General Harrison for President. 

In the same year Mr. Hubbard was the Republican 
nominee for Attorney General of West \^irginia ; the 
ticket that year being headed by General Goff, in the 



memorable campaign against Judge A. Brooks Fleming, 
for governor. The entire Republican ticket was defeat- 
ed, by a very close vote. 

The Congressional convention for the First district 
named him as a candidate for congress in 1890; but he 
■was defeated. 

In 1895 1^1''^ West \'irginia Bar Association, elected 
him as its president. 

In 1901 Governor White named Mr. Hubbard a 
member of the state tax commission, whose duty it was 
to re\ise and ]-)ractically make anew the state assessment 
and ta.xation laws. He was elected president of this 
commission and much of the ardous work devohed ujjon 
him. The tax laws framed by this commission are now 
in full o])erati()n throughout the state and mark a new 
era in the fair and equal taxation of every specie of 
pro])erty. 

.\s he prospered in his profession Mr. Hubbard 
invested his earnings in the industries in and about his 
home city, especiall}- in the iron industries, in which he 
and his famil}' have been engaged for a half century. 
Repeated efforts have been made by the steel trust to 
absorb these industries ; but he and his associates have 
resolutely declined to sell and have kept the ownership 
of these properties in \\'heeling people. 

In T906 he delivered the convocation address at the 
University. He and his associates of the tax commission 
also donated their compensation as members of the 
commission to the University to found a fund, the in- 
terest of which is annually awarded as a prize for the 
"best original work bearing- on matters of taxation in 



10 



West A'irginia." This ])rize is open to all students of 
the University. 

Mr. Hubbard was elected to the 6oth congress in 
1906, as a member of the House, from the First district 
and in 1908 was re-elected to the 6ist congress, after 
comi)elling his political opponents to submit their can- 
didacy for nomination along with his to a vote of the 
electors of his party in a district jirimary, wherein he 
was overwhelmingly nominated, llefore assuming his 
duties as a national legislator he resigned from all the 
business directorates of which he was a member, that 
he might be entirely free to devote his undivided time 
to his public duties — and feel no conflict between public 
duty and private interest. In the halls of congress he 
has taken rank as a real statesman, with a sense of duty 
to provide for the needs, and safeguard the interests of 



his people. He is a member of one of the more impor- 
tant committees of the House, that of Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce. 

At this writing (Ajjril, T910) he is a candidate for 
United vStates Senator to succeed Senator Scott, whose 
term exi)ires in 191 1, and his political and ])ers(>nal 
friends, whose name is legion, in e\ery count} in the 
state wish him the fullest measure of success in his 
candidacy. 

In 1909 he was elected president of the State Board 
of I'rade, which is the leading business and commercial 
organization of the state. 

Mr. Hubbard has the degrees of A. I'., A. AI. and L. 
L. D. from his schools of learning and is a member of the 
.Academy of Political and Social Sciences; of the Ameri- 
can Economic Association and of the American Geo- 
graphic Association, and of Phi Beta Xu fraternity. 



1 1 




Samuel p, proton 

AMUEL B. BROWN. Head of the r)ei)art- 
ment of Geology, is one of the most ])o])iilar 
instructors in tlie University. Xot only has 
he a great store of learning and wit but also 
a charming personality which endears him to 
his students. His almost boundless knowledge of Geo- 
logy, German, Geography and kindred subjects is ecpial- 
ed only by his appreciation of a joke and his kindliness 
toward his students. He has a mild manner though he 
can be firm when occasion requires. He is good natured 
and genereous to a fault. His slow, southern drawl is 
very delightful to hear. Some say it is soothing; if that 
is the case, let us hope that the students are few and 
far between who would yield to its influence. He is 
very progressive and keeps abreast of the times, especi- 
ally in the matter of pronunciation. 

He simplv radiates cheerfulness and is one of the 
best cures for the blues around the University. Indeed, 
his cheery influence is such that one feels better for 
having known him. And no one can afford to leave the 
University without having basked for at least three 
months in the genial smile of our dear, beloved "Sammy" 
Brown. 



13 



€noc() Jlotoarb ^itav^ 




EST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY has sent 
her sons to win honor in every profession 
and in many countries. Even in far-off 
Japan, a man is holding a position of lienor 
and trust, who received his first real im- 
petus to learning- under the old gold and blue. This 
distinguished elder brother to us. the undergraduates, 
is ^Ir. Enoch Howard A'icars of the class of 1890. While 
here he was an active college man. being editor of the 
Athenaeum and the Commencement Daily. For two 
years after graduation he was assistant in the prepara- 
tory school and then studied at Harvard, the University 
of lierlin and the University of Paris. In 1893. 'i^? '^^'O" 
the Robert Treate Paine fellowship at Harvard, which 
ga\e him an opportunity for further studv and travel m 
Europe. 

Since 1898 he has been Professor of Political Econ- 
omy and Finance at Keiogijnka University, Tokio, where 



he instructs the Japanese boys, and is often the "most 
honorable" representative of the United States on state 
occasions. 

One year after his arrival in Tokio he married Miss 
Kiyo Nellie Nishgawa. Her mother was an l^nglish 
woman and the daughter was educated in Germany and 
England. Before and since her marriage she has been 
a teacher of European language and customs to the 
ladies of the royal family. 

Air. A'icars has spent much of his time studying the 
customs of the people among whom he lives, and has 
gazed upon the wonders of the country, including the 
forests in miniature and the Emperor's Bridge, which no 
other foot than that of the Emperor has ever profaned. 
I kit whether resting in his garden with his two beautiful, 
almond eyed children or lecturing on profound subjects 
he sustains the dignity of the United States and West 
A'irginia University in a "most honorable" fashion. 



15 



Cfje ^niber^itp Council. 



Daniel Boardmaii Purinton. 
Harry Anthony Eaton. 
Alfred Jarrett Hare. 
Alexander Reid Wliitehill. 
Waitman Barbe 
Powfrll Benton Reynolds. 
Charles Edgar Hogg. 
Thomas Clark Atkeson. 
Frederick Wilson Truscott. 
Will Hozen Houghton. 
Robert Allen Armstrong. 



16 



^tate Jloarb of Control 



JAMES S. LAKIX Charleston. 

THOMAS E. HODGES Charlesion. 

JOHN A. SHEPHERD Charleston 



17 



^tate poarb of Regents!. 



M. P. SHAWKEY, President Charleston. 

GEORGE S. LAIDLEY Charleston. 

MYRON C. LOUGH Fairmont. 

JOHN B. PINLEY Parkersburg. 

GEORGE E. NORTHCOTT Huntington. 

P. W. MORRIS, Secretary Parkersburg. 



18 



(BtUctx9i of :lDmimgtration anlJ anstruction. 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTOX, Ph. D., L. L. D President. 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, D. D Chaplain. 

WAITMAN BARBE, Litt. D Assistant lo President and Field Agent. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE Dean of Women. 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. :\I Registrar. 

ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, Ph. D Bursar. 

WILLIAM J. WHITE Auditor. 

CLEMENT ROSS .JONES Consulting Engineer for Grounds and Buildings. 



19 



3Ct)e Jfacultp. 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PUEINTOX, Ph. D.. L. L. D. 
President and Professor of Philosophy. 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B. S., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus. 

WILLIAM PATRICK WILLEY, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Equity, .lurisprudence, and Commercial 
Law. 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, A. M., D. D. 

Chaplain and Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL. A. M.. Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry. 

THOINIAS CLARK ATKESON, M. S., Ph. D. 

Dean of the College of Agriculture and Professor 
of Agriculture. 

FREDERIC LINCOLN EMORY. M. M. E.. M. E. 

Professor of ^Mechanics and Applied IMathematics. 

SAMUEL board:\[an BFOWN, a. B., a. M. 
Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A. M., L. H. D. 

Professor of English Language and Literature and 
Head of the Departm.ent of English. 

BERT HOLMES KITE, M. S. 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

A.LFRED .TARRETT HARE. A. B., A. :M. 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON, A. B., A. M. 
Professor of Rhetoric. 

FREDERICK WILLIAJI TRUSCOTT, A. :\I., Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature. 

HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN, A. B., LL. D. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 



CLEMENT ROSS .lOXES. B. S. C. E., M. M. E. 

Professor of ]Mechanical Engineering. 
WILL HAZEN BOUGHTON, B. S. C. E., C. E. 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, B. S. C. E., C. E. 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, A. M., Ph. D. 
Professor of Education. 

JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, 
Dean of Women. 

I a:\1ES MORTON CALLAHAN, A. ^L, Ph. D. 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, A. B. 

Director of Physical Training. 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, A. B., 'SI. D. 

Professor of Anatomy and Physiology and Head of 
the Medical Faculty at ilcrgantown. 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph. B., A. M. 
Professor of English Philology. 

CHARLES EDGAR HOGG, LL. D. 

Dean of the College of Law and Professor of Con- 
stitutional and International Law. 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORTRIGHT, B. S.. D. Se. 
Professor of Chemistry. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A. B., A. M. 
Professor of Latin. 

HARRY ANTHONY EATON, A. B., LL. B. 

Captain U. S. Army, Professor of Miliiary Science 
and Tactics and Commandant of Cadets. 



21 



JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph. B., Ph. D. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JUSTIN FRANK GFANT, Ph. B.. M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy and Pathology. 

ALBERT MOORE REESE, A. B., Ph. D. 
Professor of Zoology. 

OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD, A. B., Ph. D. 
Professor of European History. 

C. EDMUND NEIL, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTEP, LL. B.. Ph. D. 
Professor of Law. 

CHAUNCEY WILLIAM WAGGONEP, A. M., Ph. D. 
Professor of Physics. 

WAITMAN BARBE, A. M., Litt. D. 

Assistant to the President and Associate Professor 
of the English Language and Literature. 

WILLIAM JACKSON LEONARD, 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts. 

DANIEL WEBSTER WORKING, B. Sc, A. M. 

Superintendent of Agricultural Extension Work. 

SIMEON CONANT SMITH, A. B., A. I\I. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric. 

LLOYD LOWNDES FRIEND, 

Associate Professor of Secondary Education. 

MADISON STATHERS, A. B., Ph. D. 

Assistant Professor of l omance Languages. 

ARETAS WILBU^. NOLAN, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Forestry, and 
Economic Entomology. 

DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS, A-. B., LL. M. 

Head of the Department of Commerce. 

FREDERICK RANDOM WHIPPLE, M. D. V. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. 

CLARENCE POST, A. B. 

Instructor in Phvsics. 



CHARLES WALKER SPRINGER, V. M. D. 
Instructor in Veterinary Science. 

THOMAS HOWAF.D GATHER, 

Instructor in Machine Shop and General Foreman 
of Shops. 

JOHN BEHNY GRUMBEIN 

Instructor In Mechanical Engineering and Foreman 
of the Wood Shop. 

ROBERT BRUCE BRINSMADE, B. S., E. M. 
Professor of Mining Engineering. 

ARTHUR POLLING GRAVES, A. B., A. M. 
Instructor in German. 

(VRLEIGH LEE DARBY, A. B., A. M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

MABEL CONSTANCE FOSTER, 
Assistant in Piano. 

LOriSE FERRIS CHEZ, 

Assistant Director of Physical Training in charge 
of the Women's Gymnasium. 

RUFUS ASA WEST, 

Assistant in Metal Working and Stationary Engineer. 

URIAH BARNES, LL. B. 
Assistant in Law. 

NEVA AUGUSTA SCOTT, 

Assistant in Domestic Science. 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING, A. B. 
Assistant in Commerce. 

LOUIS BLACK, 

Director of the School of Music and Head of the 
Department of Vocal Music. 

.VIATGAPET WTNTON HORNE, 
Instructor in Violin. 

EVA EMMA HUBBARD. 

Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B. :\I. 

Instructor on the Piano and Pipe Organ. 



CHARLES AUGUSTUS LUEDER, D. V. M. 
Instructor In Dairying. 



22 



RUDOLF WEKTIME, 

Head of Piano Department. 



DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A. B., A. M. 
Instructor in English. 

WILLIAM HENRY GALLUP, A. B., A. ^L 

Instructor in Rlatliernatics and History 
paratory School. 

MARGARET BUCHANAN, A. B. 

Instructor in Greelc and Mathematics. 



\V. A. MESTREZAT, 

Assistant in Music (Wind Instruments). 

THOMAS BOND FOULK, B. S. C. E. 

Instructor in Mathematics in the Preparatory School 
and Graduate Manager of Athletics 

HELEN LOVELAND TREAT, 

Assistant in Music. 



LIBUAIIY STAFF 

LUCY ELLA FAY Librarian. 

JESSICA GARDINER CONE Assistant Librarian. 

DORA MOORE, Ph. B Assistant Librarian. 

EvATHERINE CLIFTON HEDEICK. .Assistant in Law Library. 
ANNA GRACE COX Assistant Librarian 




23 



0llktv^. 



JAMES ROY ECKMAN President. 

THOMAS SHAFFER PATTERSON Vice-President 

RENA FRANCES TUTTLE Secretary 

HOMER ARTHUR HOSKINS Treasurer. 

OLARA BELLE LYTLE Historian. 

MARY MEEK ATKESON Poet, 

^AMES GUY ALLENDER Pliopliet. 



26 




HELEN BLANCHE VANCE, A. B. 
Chi Omega; Retejos Jichancas; Eng- 
lish Club; Beowulf Club; Columbian 
Literary Society; V. V. Club; Choral 
Society; Woman's League; Sopho- 
more Historian; Vice-President Wo- 
man's League; Assistant Editor-in- 
Ciiief Monticola; Secretary Debating 
Association; Athenaeum Board; Se 
Micel Scop. 



ARTHUR MELVILLE JACOBS, A. B. 
Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Athenaeum 
Board; Class Baseball Team. 





OLIVE IRELAND HODGES, A. B. , 
Y. W. qti A.; Student Volunteer 
Band: Women's League; English 
Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 1909-10. 



NYNA FORMAN. B. S. 
Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League: Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet 1909-10; ".Junior 
Prom" Committee 1909. 





ROY OLNEY HALL, LL. M. 
Kappa Alpha; Mountain; Areopagus; 
Parthenon Literary Society; Presi- 
dent Class "09; "Summit" of "The 
Mountain" "09, '10; President Par- 
thenon Literary Society "09; Cad-t 
Major '08, '09; Winner of M. C. Lily 
Prize Saber for best drilled company 
of Cadets '08; Winner of Regents 
Gold Medal for Drill and Discipline 
'0 6; LL. B. 19 09 West Virginia Uni- 
versity. 



HARRY RUFFNER WILEY, 

B. S. C. E. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Mountain; Y. M. 
C. A.; Football 1908-09, 1909-10; 
Baseball 1906-07, 1907-08, 1908-(I9. 





LEROY HOLMER MORRIS, 

B. S. M. E. 
Phi Kappa Psi; University Track 
Team '08, '09; Captain Track Team 
'09. 



.JOHN CHRISLER EVANS, A. B. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Mountain; Eng- 
lish Club; Y. M. C. A.; Columbian; 
Inter Collegiate D;bate "08; Tax^ 
Commissioner's Prize '09; Cadet Ad- 
jutant '08 and '09; Cadet Major '09 
and '10; Military Ball Committee '08^ 
'09, '10; Judge Advocate, Court Mar- 
tial '09; Students' Assistant in Eng- 
lish '08; Students' Assistant in Math- 
ematics '09; Associate Editor Athe- 
naeum '08, '09; Editor Athenaeum, 
Fall '09. 




28 




FRANK FEEVES, A. B. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Y. M. C. A. 



MARGARET ELEANOR MOCKLEP, 

A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League; Rete- 
jos Jichancas; Wesleyan Club; Cor- 
responding Secrrtary Woman's Lea- 
gue 1909-10; Secretary Wesleyan 
Club 1908-09; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
19 09-10; Delegate to Y. W. C. A 
Conference, Mt. Lake Park, 1908. 





LUTHER SHERMAN BRITTON, 
A. B. 

Columbian Literary Society; Presi- 
dent Columbian Literary Society, 
Spring 1910. 



CHARLES MOON, B. S. C. E. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Y. :M. C. 
English Society. 

29 





NOBLE ABNBR WOLFE, B. S. M. E. 



EDGAR PEARL McCOMBS, 

B. S. C. E. 
Y. M. C. A. 





W. L. PIPES, B. S. of M. B. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Y. M. C. A. 



TREVBY NUTTER, LL. B. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Columbian Liter- 
ary Society; Wesleyan Club; Presi- 
dent College Literary Society, Fall 
'07; Athenaeum Board 'OS; Historian 
Senior Law Class '09; Counsel Com- 
mittee Moot Court Trial '09; Intel - 
Society Debating Team '10; Diploma 
in Law '09. 




30 




HOMER ARTHUR HOSKINS, B. S. 

E. E. 
Y. M. C. A.; Columbian Literary 
Society; Engineering- Society; 2nd., 
IJeutenant Cadet Corps; Treasurer 
Senior Class. 



GEORGE EDWARD RHODES, A. B. 
Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary So- 
ciety; Treasurer Class '09; Critic, 
Parthenon Society: Graduate Pea- 
body College for Teachers, Nashville, 
Tenn. 





; ROVER CLEVELAND LEMLEY, 

B. S. C. E. 
I'lii Sigma Kappa 



RODNEY MILTON STE.MPLE. B. S. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Mountain. 




31 




KARL SPENCER LASHLEY, B. S. 



JOHN LAWSETTEE MOLLISON, 

LL. B. 
Delta Tau Delta; Mountain; Sphinx: 
Athletic Board 1908-09. 





JAMES ROY ECKMAN, A. B. 
Phi Kappa Psi ; Mountain; Sphinx; 
Columbian Literary Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; West Virginia Chemical So- 
ciety; Inter-Class Council, Chairman; 
Areopagus Secretary; President Sen- 
ior Class; Monticola Board '09; Man- 
ager Class Baseball Team '09. 



ROBERT MURRAY GAWTHROP, 

B. S. C. E. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Columbian Literary 
Society; Captain Track Team. 




32 




AUSTIN COOK MERRILL, LL. B. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Theta Nu Epsilon; 
Beta Delta Beta; Sphinx: Catcher 
Baseball Team: Half-back Football 
Team: A. B. Yale. 



FREDERICK ROST KOELZ, A. B. 
Phi Kappa Psi: IMountain: Colum- 
bian Literary Society: Y. il. C. A.: 
Dramatic Club: V. V. Club; Athena- 
eum Board '07, "08; President V. V. 
Club '08, 09; Editor-in-Chief Monti- 
cola "09; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '09/10 ; 
"Junior Prom" Committee '09; Chor- 
ister Columbian Literary Society '0 8. 





A. B. WILLIS. 



WALTER WARREX POINT, Jr.. 

B. S. -M. D. 
Kappa Alpha; Sphinx; :\Iountain: Y. 
M. C. A.; Cadet Corps; V. V. Club: 
President Sophomore Class 'OS; Bus- 
iness Manager .Monlicola '09: Asst. 
Mgr. Varsity Baseball Team '09; Man- 
ager Varsity Baseball Team '10: 
Varsity Baseball Team '09; 1st Lieu- 
tenant Co. B '10: President V. V. 
Club '09; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '10: 
Varsity Track Team '07; Class Track 
Team '07, '08; Class Basketball Team 
'08, 09: Class Baseball Team '07. 
'08, '09; Distinguished Cadet '07; 
President Pan-Hellenic Baseball Lea- 
gue '09; Captain "Southpaws" '08. 




33 




JAY EDGAR BILLINGSLEY, 

B. S. C. E. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Y. M. C. A. 
Areopagus; Engineering Society 
Captain Class Baslcetball Team (3) 
Chairman "Junior Prom" Committee 
(3); Monticola Board (3); Athletic 
Board of Control (4). 



ROBERT LESTER BUCHANAN, 

B. S. 
Y. M. C. A.; Class Football Team 
(1 ) ; Class Track Team { 2 ) ; Track 
Team (3); Distinguished Cadet (2); 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory 
(3), (4). 





ERNST BELL, K. A. 



ANDREW ALPHONSO TORRANCE, 

B. S. 
Y. M. C. A. 

34 





ETHEL GRIM PETERSON, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta; Parthenon Literary 
Society; Fairmont Normal Club; Y. 
W. C. A.; Grange; English Glub; 
Beowulf Glub; Woman's League; 
Editor-ln-Ghlef of Monongalian 1909- 
1910; Secretary of Woman's League 
1909-1910; Corresponding Secretary 
Y. W. C. A. 1909-1910; Secretary 
Parthenon Literary Society, Winter 
09; Leader Inter-Society Contestants 
1909: :\Ionticola Board 1910. 



VERB PETERSON, A. B. 
Kappa Alpha; Y. M. C. A.; Grange; 
Fairmont Normal Glub; Parthenon 
Literary Society; Business Manager 
Athenaeum, 1909-1910; Vice-Presi- 
dent and Bible Study Leader Y. :M. C. 
A. '09, '10- Chaplain Grange 1910. 





ARCHIE HUPP BULLARD, B. S. 
Sigma Nu; Sphinx: W. V. U. Chemi- 
cal Society: Football "06, "07, '09. 



THOMAS SHAFFER PATTERSON. 

B. S. M. E. 
Sigma Nu; Theta Psi; Y. M. C. A.: 
Vice-President Senior Glass. 



35 





WILBUR EARL GATHER, LL. B. 
The Mountain; English Club; Cadet 
Corps; Grange; Y. M. C. A.; Parthe- 
non Literary Society; Dramatic Club; 
Inter-Society Orator; President and 
Critic Parthenon Literary Society; 
Monongalian Board; Editor-in-Chief 
Athenaeum; Athenaeum Board. 



MARY MEEK ATKESON, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta; University Grange: 
English Club; Beowulf Gedryht; Y. 
W. C. A.; Woman's League: Secre- 
tary of Music Club; Member of Mon- 
ongalian Board; Assistant Editor-in- 
Chi f of Monongalian Board; Clerk 
of English Club; Head of English 
Club 1907-1910; Editor in Chief 
Monongalian; President Pan-Hellen- 
ic; Poet of the Senior Class; Flora 
of University Grange: Associate Edi- 
tor of the "Alpha Xi Delta;" Monti- 
cola Prize Story '05. 





NELLIE GRANT 

HENDERSON, A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Parthenon Liter- 
ary Society; Woman's League; 
Secretary Y. W. C. A. 19 09-10; 
Corresponding Secretary Wo- 
man's League '09; Chorister 
Parthenon Literary Society Fall 
'09, Winter '10; Secretary Par- 
thenon Literary Society, Spring 
'08; Delegate to Y. W. C. A. 
Conference, Cincinnati, O., 'OS. 



CLARA BELLE LYTLE, A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. 
A.: English Club; Beowulf Ged- 
ryht ; \\'oman's League; Rete- 
jos .Jichancas; Parthenon Liter- 
ary Society; Corresponding Sec- 
retary Y. W. C. A. '07 and '0 8; 
Delegate to Y. W. C. A. Con- 
vention; Monticola Board 'OS 
and '09; Secretary Woman's 
League '07 and 'OS; Clerk of 
English Club;- Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet ; Beoweard of Beowulf 
Gedryht; Historian of Senior 
Class; Secretary Students' Pub- 
lishing Association; Monongal- 
ian Board: Critic of Parthenon 
Literary Society. 





HARLES WILLIAM LOUCHERY, 

A. B. 
igma Chi: Theta Nu Epsilon; Man- 
ner '09 Football Team; Pan-Hellenic 
lub; Areopagus; Mountain. 



BOYD MILFORD S:\1ITH, LL. B. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta Nu Epsilon: 
Glee and Mandolin Clubs; University 
Choral Society; Dramatic Club; Uni- 
versity String Quartet; Class Histor- 
ian (1); Manager Class Football 
Team (1); Secretary W. V. A. A. 
(2); Secretary Students' Publishing 
Assoc. (2); Assistant Manager Var- 
sity Football Team (3); Law Histor- 
ian (3); Monticola Board (3); Secre- 
tary Senior Law ( 4 ) ; President Dra- 
matic Club (4). 





GEORGE GRANT CREWSON, 

B. S. M. E. 
Y. M. C. A.; Monticola 1909; Ath- 
letic Board 1910. 



HARRY ANTHONY EATON, 

B. S. C. E. 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Mountain; Mem- 
ber University Council; Member Ath- 
letic Board of Control; A. B. 1897. 
LL. B. 1898. 




37 




LEO CARLIN, A. B. 

Beta Theta Pi; Mountain; 

English Club. 



Spliinx; 



MARY STEWART FRAVEL, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Wo- 
man's League. 





XELL STEELE, A. B. 

Kaiipa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A.; 

Woman's League; Woman's League 

Treasurer; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 

Athenaeum Board; Monongalian 

Board. 



DAVE HAEMAN KAHN, B. S. E. M. 
Theta Nu Epsilon; Mountain. 





JOSEPH COCHRAN VANCE, A. B. 
Parthenon Literary Socisty; Y. M. 
C. A.; First place Regents' prize in 
Declamation; Bryan prize in Politi- 
cal Science (2); Regents' prize in 
Composition ( 3 ) ; Declaimer, Parthe- 
non Literary Society (4). 



ETHEL ICE, A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; English Club; 
Beowulf Gedryht; Y. W. C. A.; Dele- 
gate Y. W. C- A. Conference, Gran- 
ville, Ohio; President Woman's Lea- 
gue; Executive Committee of Wo- 
man's League; Secretary of Junior 
Class; Monticola Board. 




^ 




REXA FRANCES TUTTLE, A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League; Par- 
thenon Literary Society; Secretary 
Senior Class. 



MAHALA DORCAS PRICHARD. 

A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W. C. A.; 
Woman's League; Columbian Liter- 
ary Society; Pan-Hellenic Associa- 
tion; President Y. W. C. A. (3 and 
4); Delegate to Y. W. C. A. Annual 
Conference, Mt. Lake Park, Md.; 
ilonticola Board; Junior Class His- 
torian; Junior Prom Committee; 
Athletic Board; Treasurer Tennis 
Club. 




tt- 



'MP- 
j4t 



Senior Clnss Historiu 




^Va ^ A*»>- 



^ ^'v ^ Aft: 



J?vu,^^^- 






.^^^xi-r^^.^SjsJ,. 



KING DANIEL l-PART 1 



PROLOGUE. 



i\Ior<4ant(>\\ n. Court of Kinii" Daniel I. Enter Gen- 
eral liarhe in niilitar\- dress, lie announces his late 
\ ictories and bids the kinj;- j)repare to receive the captives 
Vi'ho are being- led hither. 

ACT I. 
Scene i. 

Room in Science llall. King's head(|uarters. King- 
seated on throne. Gentlemen of the Court in attendance. 
Enter General I'.arbe followed by crowd of prisoners of 
war. All kneel before the king and swear allegiance. 
Scene 2. 

Campus. Flourish of flruins. Enter, from opposite 
sides, two armies in motley dress. Capt. Ryan's army 
under the ""( Jrnuge anrl I 'hick" meets tl^e opposing host. 
The}- light. Flag of truce sent v.^). Injured are ■ carried 
ofif of the held. Struggle renr 
Lieut. I-lall's host flees iKi',->ued 

ACT n. 
Scene i. 

CiA-mnasiun-i. 



Without the 



'd. Retreat sounded. 
V Ryan's force. 



Xight, Lord Point's 



forces l)eseiging the stronghold, 'i'he beseigcd resort to 
the use of hc.^e for defense. Xothing daunted the at- 
tacking force continues the seige. S(n)n ?n entrance is 
forced and the strongltold i:lundcred. 'i'he l)eseiged 
make their escape. 

Scene 2. 

Xight, Street near W Oman's lijl. ICnter two men in 
disguise who station themsehes as guards. Enter two 
others in painter's clothes carrying bucket of Sherman. 
Williams ready mixed guaranteed black jjaint. Th.e 
decoration of Woman's llall legins. I!ell heard within. 
Sentinels so\ind an alarm. Workmen secrete them- 
selves and ^\ait for results. Hell rings again longer and 
louder, then ceases suddenly. .Xo further sounds. Sen- 
tinels decide that the distur1)ance is due to an unre- 
lial)le alarm-clock within, so orders men ])ack to work. 
Xo fur^er disturbance. A\'ork done, painters retire with 
empt>"^ucket. 

Scene 3. 
Alonongaliela River. Report of guns. Fort "11" 
has ojKMied lire uj^on The '"Orange and Ulack." who fires 
in return. Fight lasts until sundown when the latter 



41 



comes out victorious with the loss of but one man, two 
hats and a shoe. 

Scene 4. 
/Cight. Chi iDoard a l)oat on the Monongahela near 
Star Cilv. Report of gun heard from the bank. Search- 
Hght reveals the form of a man. Boats pull into shore. 
Rescue "JNIickie." Sounds of music within. 

ACT III. 

Scene i. 

Ladies' Parlor. Night. Temporary stage erected. 
Enter crowd of sj^ectators. Players follow. Applause. 
Play presented. Exeunt players. Applause. Re-enter 
players in citizens attire. Rattle of dishes is heard with- 
out. Enter serxaius licaring loaded trays. Feasting fol- 
lows. Reveling cuntinucs until late hour. 
Scene 2. 

Document Room, Library. Table covered with form- 
er editions of the Monticola, Saturday evening Post, 
Life and Ladies llome Journal, Editor Koelz and sev- 
eral wan looking assistants are seated -at table. Enter 
Crewson bearing huge bundle of jokes and roasts. All 
retire meeting Louchery puffing and red in the face. He 
is bringing an immense basket filled with organization 
data which he hurriedly dumps upon the table and 
retires. 

Scene 3. 

Armory brilliantly lighted and draped with "Orange 
and lilack" intermingled with "Gold and Blue." Enter 
Lords and Ivadies in evening dress. Dancing begins. 
Twelve P. ]\L dancing interrupted by refreshments. 
Dancing continues. Two A. AL dancing still continues. 
Three A. M. Home \\'altz. Exeunt All. 



Scene 4. 

AVharf. Gay crowd moving along the bank. jMo 
pursuing. No attacks in ambush. Embarking takes 
place peacefully and cjuietlv. 

Scene 5. 

Document Room, Library. Enter Ivoelz bearing 
under his arm a small book bound in "Black and 
Orange." 1-le soliloquizes on the "emptiness of emp- 
tinesses "Enter Pidge, Loucherey, Dorcas, the two 
Ethels. Plelen. Eikman, Billingslea, Griffin. Clara, Smith, 
.-Vllender, Crewson with bundles of Mother Goose 
Rhymes, Conundrums, Prof. A\'rite U 
miscellaneous parts of the LTnpublished 
weeping. Material cremated, 
ashes in urns. 



Puzzles and 
1 liook." General 
All retire with the sacred 



ACT IV. 

Scene i. 

Cam])us. Two seniors appear. Others in gray caps 
pass and salute. 

Scene 2. 

Ladies' Parlor, Enter Ladies and attendants carry- 
ing boxes of uneedas, jars of peanut, ])ickles, sardines, 
cheese and apples. A feast is spread. Noise in hall. 
Enter Sir ]!ob with one dozen dills. Eeast continues. 
Enter messenger boy with telegram from "Mickie". 
Feasting discontinues with the disappearance of the 
edibles. Exeunt Ladies accompanied by knights. 
Scene 3. 

Campus. Stream of pilgrims in black robes appear 
and consult the oracle. 

Scene 4. 

Another Part of Campus. Enter solemn procession 



42 



under flag- of "Orange and Black" at half mast. Work- 
men enter with tools and raise a stone to the memorv 
of "The Orange and lUack." 

Scene 5. 

Commencement Hall. King Daniel. Emperor Fred- 
erick. Kings of England and Italy, liishop Reynolds and 
General T.arbe enter in late followed by imposing pM-o- 
cession in black that kn>.el Iiefore the King. King pre- 
sents each of his faithful subjects with a document bear- 
ing his seal. Exeunt all. 



ACT V. 

Scene i. 

In front of King's Palace. King and Court sealed 
Enter Lords and Ladies for the coronation. King 
raises all to ])ositions of state in his realm: s' me are 
made kings of countries subject to his ];o\ver : some 
dukes and duchesses, princes and ])rincesses. others go 
as consuls and ambassadors to foreign courts. The Gold 
and lUue is raised. All salute. E.xeunt. 



Jvl 



fSr 



48 







.."•^r 



I' 



^;^ti^,v^-^»»^' - ?^^^^ 



>f^; 




Junior Clafi!£( 0ltimi. 

ROGER EARL WATSON President 

HERMAN DEIDLER POCOCK Vice-President 

CLARA ELIZABETH DICKASON Secretary 

FRANCIS WILLARD STEELE Treasurer 

EDWARD HILL TUCKWILLER Historian 



46 




LEDA CORDELIA ATKESON. 

••I really havn'i any." 



MARY A. ALEXANDER, 
"O, Pete." 





CLAY DILLIE A.MOS, 
"Say don't I want to see you. 




CHARLES GEORGE BAKER, 
"Ga — don the luck, anyway." 



HYRE CLYDE BRAKE, 

"Now young man!" 





HOWAKD ROBERT BARTLETT, 
"Go to thunder." 



48 




HOWARD KENTWELL BURRELL. 
"Well are you on." 



EDWARD HENRY BEARDSLEY 
"Oh, what's the use." 





OFY HEHMAX BTRXSIDE 
■By Heck." 



49 




AGNES CADY, 
Oil. I'm so sleepy. 



ARTHUR ACQUILLA BRINDLEY, 
"Pooh! Pooh!" 





CLARK CULBERTSON BURRITT, 
"Well, Well, Well." 



50 




STANLEY RHEY COX, 

'Well it's about time to slip down 

to Susan's." 



LUCY CLARE CLIFFORD, 
"What in Sam Hill." 





GEORGE HAROLD CU.M.MIXS, 
'Parlez vous fraiicais. monsieur. 



51 




HELEN MARGARET DE BERRY, 

"Life is such a bore." 



CLARA ELIZABETH DICKASON, 
'It nial<es no never mind to me. 





iMOSES STARK DONALLY, 
"Gaul — lee." 



52 




JOHN LEE GRAYSON. 
Do you really think so.' 



BOYCE RAY FITZGERALD, 
* "1 don't cai-e." 





SYDNEY LOTH FRIED.MAN, 
"Can't fool a fat." 



53 




PAULINE THEAKSTON, 
■'I have an idea." 



SAMUEL HENRY SANGER, 
"Its up to you." 





EARL WOODDELL SHEETS, 
'Don't bother me, I'm in a hurry. 



54 




GEORGE TRUMAN TWYFORD, 
"I'll be there." 



GEORGE WALTER GROW 
T have got you." 





HV SWISHER VANDERVORT. 
'Just came back from Van Vooi-hii 




ARTHUR BROWN HODGES, 

"Oh. hell, I'm busy." 



GEOEGE HUTCHINSON GUNNOB, 
"By good old Andrew." 





RICHARD JAY GOULD, 
"Oh, Cut it." 



56 




GLEXX HUNTER, 

Yes, I am a judge of feminine 

beautj'." 





ROBERT ARBUCKLE HAXDLEY 
"Me, too." 




NANCY PURLEY MORGAN, 

"That's one on me." 



LORY FRANCIS ICE, 
"I'm a quiet fellow." 





CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH, 
"Look's that way to me." 



58 




JAMES THO:\rAS MORRIS, 
"Trot along, trot along." 



EDWARD CURTIS OLDHAM, 
"Oh, nothing." 





HERMAN DEIDLER POCOCK, 
'Oh. Beck." 




MAJORIE BONNER PATTERSON, 
"I don't like that." 



ROBERT SIDNEY REED, 
"Mirabile Dictu." 





PEARL LOUISE REINER, 
"Oh piffle, N. B. A. sub." 



60 




JOHN LOWRIE ROBINSON. 
"Can't make me mad." 



DAVID BRIGHT REGER. 
"I'm not scared." 





LONNIE WATTEKSON RYAN. 
"Not on votir lite." 




GENEVIEVE STEALEY, 
"Oh, bugs!" 



JAMES HARRISON RIDDLE, 
"Cat's ankle." 





GOLDIE SHEETS, 
"What next." 



62 



^ 




EDWARD HILL TUCKWILLER, 
■'Who are you." 



WILLARD FRANCIS STEELE, 
"Just wait, you'll see." 





HARRY COOPER STlLTlXc; 
"Be quiet, or I'll clew you." 



63 




CLAUDE SPRAY TETRICK, 
"K'splash." 



ROGER EARL WATSON, 
"See what I've done." 





ADAM F. KEYSER, 
"Help, help, help." 



64 



^ 




HRF.RX MERVIX WEISTLING. 

"W'OH is niP." 



RALPH THOMAS THAYER, 
"Iz that so." 





STELLA REBECCA WILSON. 
"You dear child." 



65 




SAM BIERN, 
'No, indeed, sah. 



EMILY JOSEPHINE WILMOUTH, 
'May the lightning strilve me pink." 





THOMAS R. McMINN, 
"Oh, pshaw." 



66 



^-^s# 



3umor Class Bistorg. 



^-% 

^6^ 



^^tf('T now behooves me, since a record of tlie deeds of 
l^^lj the truly great should be preserved for the bene- 
^ fit of future generations, to chronicle the history 
of the Class of 191 i. 

In the fall of 1907 the pious members and other- 
wise of the now famous Junior Class crept out from 
between the hills or rolled down from the mountain tops 
of ^\'est A'irginia and hied them to Morgantown. "For", 
said they, "we must have wisdom and much learning". 

And when the gray-haired leaders of the voung be- 
held this goodly company of promising country bump- 
kins, they opened their eyes in wonder and murmured. 
"Look! who are here." It is needless to add that their 
amazement has been continually gTowing as thev more 
fully appreciate the diligence, determination and intel- 
ligence of the members of this great class. Each one 
of these noble snake-hunters either stole or bought a 
book of num]:)er, and went in unto JohnuA" and immed- 
iately won his heart and good grace. Likewise, in other 
classes the Freshmen took the lead and were justly re- 
warded. 

And when Tommy was satisfied that our credits 
were not counterfeit we organized our class and elected 
as leader Mr. ?>. Lee Hutchinson, the greatest football 
warrior since Samson. Under his leadership we met 
with success everywhere. On the gridiron the v^opho- 
mores (j naked in terror, and the Preps j^rayed for mercy 
when the Freshmen ai)peared. In basket ball we were 



invincible. As a matter of fact no team capable f)f af- 
fording us amusement could be found in the University. 

Once when a reckless Soph suggested a boat-ride, a 
vision of the Freshmen arose in the eyes of each, and 
they said; "Let it not be"'. But the bolder ones would 
have it so. According!} they met with destruction at 
the hands of the Class of '11. 

"The wages of sin is death". 

We assembled again in September, 1908. and chose 
Mr. M. C. Stulting, President. Under the leadership of 
this famous masher our Sophomore year was a rej^eti- 
tion of the victories of the Freshmen year. 

And when we had annihilated all our ojjponents. we 
again took up our books, for it was most necessary to 
receive the commendation of our instructors in order to 
continue as members of the Class of 191 1. Our strength 
of purpose now stood us in good stead, for none failed 
to connect, although one or two grew weary in well-do- 
ing and slipped back to the hills. 

And now we are in our Junior year with a presi- 
dent no less illustrious than his predecessors. Mr. Earl 
Watson. This year has been and will continue to be 
one filled with duties and responsibilities. Although I 
am no prophet, vet I can easily foresee that there are 
to come aljout many things which shall in the distant 
future awaken memories of the Class of 191 1. to its 
honor. 

HISTORLXX. 



€\\ 



^^-^ A Fantasy. 

fT was midnight by the liands of the old clock on 
Martin Hall. A pale moonlight fell over every- 
thing, half revealing the stately 1)uildings round 
,^ about. Down Falling Run, the shadows deep- 

ened, hiding the secrets of the night. Far oft' 
a gleam of misty silver marked the course of the Alonon- 
gahela. 

Tonight the old clock -was very lonely. Ife had 
lived many years and his \-italit^• was slowlv failing, 
rlis hands moved painfully with rheumatic jerks and 
twinges, and his face was sadlv marked bv time and 
ill-usage. In his youth he had been the proud monarch 
of the campus with clean, smiling face, and hands mov- 
ing so merrily at the passage of time. Then men look- 
ed at him with respect. His was the voice which ruled 
class room and hall. After a glance at his face the tardy 
student would scurry to work and even the in'esident 
would hurry ou his way. thumping his cane briskly 
around the circle. 

Xow all was changed. The throng passed by with- 
out a glance "^^'e"ve got to hurry", one would sav. 
"the bell rang l^efore we left Pete's class." ".\w that 
clock isn't right. You can't tell which are its hands and 
which is the overflow of Sophomore spirits anvwav." 

The old clock stared into the moonlight. Science 
Hall and \\'oodburn were stolidlv sleeping. Perhaps 
theirs was the better lot. They had no feeling, no deli- 
cate nerves like a clock. Only kee]i their roofs from 
leaking and the vines out of their windows and they 
were happy. 



c (i^uaiClian of t\\c Campus. 

ntasv. ! Suddenh- the old clock felt ;i -■ 



Suddeid}- the old clock fell a soft toucli, and peer- 
ing down he saw a little sprite in cap and gown merrily 
clinging to one of his hands. "J am the spirit of un- 
linished recitations," it chanted. It was you who saved 
me from the sarchasm of Truscott, the fatherly surprise 
of Armstrong, and utter annihilation at the hands of 
Jack. Through you ha\e 1 come to the realization of my 
hopes." Just then another sprite came around the tower, 
walking slowly and rul)bing his eyes. "I am the spirit 
of tardiness," he said Aawning. "'S'ou're a pretty good 
old chap, you are, to take all the IjJame when a fellow's 
late to class." 

Then there came the sound of muftled drums, and a 
gallant ]dialanx of sprites on ponies came galloping in. 
Some rode with a l)old, determined air; others kejit 
their seats with difficulty. As the old clock Idinked in 
amazement, a grim shadowy figure a''])eared. which con- 
tinuall}- i)laced rows of bayc^nets in their wav marked 
■'\-erhs," "translation." or "construction." and they fell 
b}' the way in spite of frantic maneu\-ering. 

As the noise of the struggle died away, a whole 
crowd of s ;)rites came fluttering about. Some sat down 
on a ledge of the tower, pulled books and notes from 
their pockets and ])ored o\er them oblivious to their 
surroundings. Others wildly tore their hair and glared 
at their books, now and then emitting a heartrendering 
groan. Near l:)y a group of girls were making fudge on 
a chafing dish with a German grammar suspended by a 
string before them. From a dark corner came murmurs 
of "amo, amas, amat." Other s])rites dashed around 
with buckets of paint and green caps, making them- 



71 



selves generally obnoxious, until seized upon and sup- 
pressed by others with Greek pins on their coats. Still 
others pulled their hats over their eyes, crossed their 
knees comfortably and with a bored expression, smoked 
cigarettes. 

Just then there was a great commotion. "I appeal 
from the decision of the court,"" screamed a frenzied 
sprite, banging" his fist on the tower and running his 
fingers through his hair. "1 protest, your honor, that it 

is contrary to the statute of limitations "" Instantly 

he was pulled down and other sprites hopped wildlv 
around screaming at the top of their voices. 

The old clock looking around with a bored expres- 
sion noticed one figure which took no part in the melee, 
but stood in dignified aloofness. He could not gues« 
who it was, until peering closer, he saw a gold headed 
cane and a shining silk hat protruding from under his 
arm. 

Several times he held up his hand for silence. 



"Gentlemen — and ladies,"" he said, nodding toward the 
dark corner, "It gives me great pleasure to witness 
your outburst of youthful spirits, A — hem. It is my 
pleasant duty to announce that the old clock which has 
witnessed so many students of West Virginia University 
quickened into intellectual life is to be elevated to a 
still higher position on the new tower of Woodburn Hall 
to watch over future generations." Hurrah for Prexy 
and tlie old clock,"' yelled the sprites. 

In the midst of the clamor the town clock in the 
distance struck one. The figure of Prexy began slowly 
to fade into the rising mist until only a bland expres- 
sion remained. The sprites gathered up their books, 
urged their ponies into motion and scrambled down the 
ivy. The old clock, suddenly realizing that his hands 
had sto]:>ped short, started them again with many rheu- 
matic twings, and went happily to sleep. Soon only 
the moon was left to watch over the campus. 




72 




-f 






>s- // 



■^ 









•^. 



^*:^f^^•:?r:; 





A i 

4^\ ( 



-*&^. 



'^^^m 




FRESHMAM 



SOPHOMORE 



HIS MAJOR STUDIES. 



74 




If \\iVw 



JUNIOR 




SENIOR 

DURING HIS COLLEGE CAREER. 



75 




76 




(BUittv^. 

GEORGE MORRIS OSBORX President 

CECIL O.MAR POST \ iLe-President 

I3DITH SCOTT SMITH Secretarv 

.MIFFLIN .AL\RSH WATKINS Treasurer 

LEONARD JULIUS BERNSTEIN Historian 

EDGAR BOYLE SPEER Cheer-Leader 

77 



€laii lAoU. 



Asa William Adkins 
Irene Marie Andris 
Jackson Van Buren Blair 
Jennie Boughner 
Leonard Julius Bernstein 
Lucy A. Beltzhoover 
Walter Bruce Bradley 
Arthur Acquilla Brindley 
Edgar Duvall Brornley 
Corwin Sage Burns 
Alma Pearl Compton 
Everette Ray Cooper 
Ernest Daniel Conaway 
Walter G. Crichton 
Thomas Wilmer Crawford 
Eugene Bverley Evans 
Wirt Garry Faust 
Howard Franklin Fleisnman 
Milton Dewitt Fisher 
Charles Duffy Floyd 
Sidney Loth Friedman 
Walter Wesley Gaskins 
Esther Jean Gilniore 
Van Wagener Gilsen 
Homer Davis Groves 
Roscoe Pariott Posten 
Charles Calvin Ryan 
Earl Woodell Sheets 
Leona May Smith 
Edgar Boyle Speer 
Harry Leslie Stilphen 
B. T. Van Gilder 
Homer Allen Lepps Walkup 
Charles Bruce Wilson 
Rhea Watson Warden 
Fred E. Vandale 



Mary M. Holroyd 
Mabel Clara Hodges 
Margaret Bradfield Hopwood 
William Brightwell Jordan 
Harry Alexander Kear 
John James Kennedy 
May Boughner King 
Jose de Almedia Kirk 
Helen Riggan Knowlton 
Allen Bennett Lambdin 
Esley S. Lively 
Charles Melvin Lough 
William Cleveland Lough 
Kemble T. Manning 
Cullen Guile Martin 
Samuel John Morris 
Logan McDonald 
Thomas Roach McMinn 
Earle Glancey McVey 
George Morris Osbcrn 
Beulah Frank Pickenpaugh 
Thomas Clyde Pitzer 
Clark Francis Poole 
Cecil Omar Post 
Melvin Herman Reinheimer 
Frank Vandersk'ce Sander 
Edith Scott Smith 
Susan Louise Smith 
Claude Carl Spiker 
Harriett E. Ste<;le 
Marion Ethel Tapp 
George Bowers Viewig 
Harry Grove Wheat 
Lewis Leitch Wilson 
Gladys Mary Waters 
Mifflin Marsh Watkins 



78 



I 



•opijomore Clasisi ^isitorp. 






To the Chief Scribe upon Athens, Judah, a Chronicle 
of the Sophs. 

I. Who can utter the might}' acts of the Sopho- 
mores? Who can shew forth all their praise? 

II. Or who can speak of their wonderful achieve- 
ments? AMio can recount their glories? 

III. For their coming to Athens was the appearance 
of a great light which brake forth ; and lo its daily rising 
was marked with rejoicing. 

IV. For it shewed the path to the simple and bright- 
ened the highway of the wise. 

V. Yea, e^'en the wanderers of the hosts of heaven 
were enticed by it, and behold, the comets came to draw 
of the magic light. 

VI. Great were the achievements of the Sophs in 
physical contests. 

\'U. In those days there was no basket ball in 
Athens, for the game incurred the loss of manv shekels. 

VIII. But the Sophs in their great wisdom, thought 
it not meet that the game should be lost to the sons of 
men. 

IX. And behold they engaged in it and excelled 
therein, and their heads were crowned with the laurels 
of victory. 

X. And also in other manly sports which strength- 
en and renew the spirit of man, were they transcendent ; 
even in football, and baseball, and active olymphics. 

XI. And lo : it happened that the Sophs met the 
Freshmen on the field of battle. 



XII. And the Sophs said: Let us break the Fresh- 
men bands asunder. 

XI II. P)Ut Lueder had it not so. and he gave the 
hands unto the Freshmen and brought victory unto 
them. 

XR'. For Lueder had consulted together with them 
with one consent and they were confederate against the 
Sophs. 

X\'. For like as a father pitieth his children so did 
Lueder pitv the I'reshmen for he knew the l)uild of the 
Sophs. 

X\'I. In those da^'s the minds of the Sophs were 
fraught with wisdom, and among their records were 
found manv thoughts. 

XA'll. ^>a, even the words of their mouths were 
like to precious pearls. 

X\^I]I. And those who read their works were 
amazed and those who heard their sayings were filled 
with wondei . 

XIX. For the words of the writer shewed knowl- 
edge and the words of the ])rophet carried truth to the 
heart of man. 

XX. The tongue of man cannot tell the mighty 
acts of the Sophs nor can it recount their achievements. 

Z\XI. Yea, the day comcth and the day goeth but 
the glory of the Sophs abideth forever. 

The Chief Scribe. 



80 



€laii 0tiktr^. 

WAYNE COX President 

JAMES CORNWALL ALLEN Vice-President 

JOHN RIBLETT KEMPER Secretary 

CHARLES EDWARD HODGES Treasurer 

RAYMOND EARL CLARK Historian 



€iai^ EoU. 



Court Edgar Amos 

Sebie Bailey 

Virginia May Baker 

Walter S. Bambrick 

Jackson Van Buren Blair, Jr. 

Ray Maxwell Babbitt 

Elizabeth Cady 

David Lament Cardin 

Raymond Earl Clark 

Wayne Cox 

Joseph Sherman Craig 

Arthur Jerome Dailey 

Anna Beulah C. Davis 

Gail Davis 

Robert Vance Duncan 

Fanny Eagan 

Cecil Thomas Enlow 

Charles Roy Poltz 

Paul Jenkins Frazler 

H. Gail Garlow 

Eustus Thomas Goff 

Sidney Emmons Graham 

G. B. Grimes 

Homer Willard Grimm 

Sadie Fay Gus;man 

Frank Hall 

Jerome Venoir Hall 



Claude Dewis Hamilton 
Grover Cleveland Hamilton 
Nellie May Herring 
Charles Edward Hodges 
John Howard Holt, Jr. 
Virginia M. Schley 
Neva Augusta Scott 
Charles Elonzo Sloan 
Louise Stealey 
Harry S. Sydenstricker 
John Paul Vandervort 
Edith Cretchen Warrick 
Edgar Williams 
Lawrence Grant Hoover 
Ollie Foster Hoover 
Stephen Paul Hosldns 
June Carey Houston 
William French Hunt 
01i^er Paul Jclliffe 
Roy Levi Jones 
John Riblett Kemper 
Albert John Kern 
H. H. Kerr 
Daniel Kirson 
J. Bertharand Levy 
Frank B. Lewellyn 
Mary G. Madera 
Truman Morris Martin 
Ida Ruth iMaxwell 



.lohn Dorilas May 
Nelle Margaret McConnel 
Howard Justus McGinnis 
Vaun McMinn 
Charles Elmer Miller, Jr. 
Alexander Miller 
William E. Muldoon 
Kussell Homer Paden 
Alvis Heber Peters 
Fielen E. Purinton 
Nicholas Hance Famsey 
Bessie Jane Feed 
H. C. Riggs 
Harold T. Rogers 
Charles S. Robinson 
John Donald Ryan 
Pearl Scott 
Ivan V. D. Shunk 
Fred Manning Smith 
Anna Cans Sturgiss 
Harrison Foy Tucker 
Thurman Elroy Vass 
George Bonnie Wheeler 
Alberta Woodford 
John Benjamin Wyatt 
John Y. York, Jr. 
Charles William Arnold 
Jane Clyde Hopwood 
Dennis Selkirk Mclntyre 



Howard Edward Weiss 
Ray Elbert Baker 
John Glenn Boughner 
Otto Dale Elson 
Richard Roeder Feller 
Robert Arbuckle Handley 
Marl Kcenan 
Frederick Earl Mealy 
James Thomas Morriss 
George E. Taylor 
James Cornwell Allen 
Edward James Baugher 
William Joseph Brennan 
Francis F. Cooper 
John David Courtney 
Thomas Hale Erwin 
Neal Minter Heflin 
Harry Oliver Humes 
Pearl Randolph Kiger 
1. L. Miller 

Denver Collins McCreery 
Ro))ert Ralph Rotuno 
T. C. Shriver 
Dean Cook-e Skinner 
Ivan R. Spears 
Carl H. Sydenstricker 
L. E. Sydenstricker 
C. F. juracy 



82 




W\)t iHasicot of tte ILm ©epartmeut. 



member of the Law Department for sev- 



Bob was 
eral years. 

He was as regular in liis attendance U])()n tlie lec- 
tures as Professor Wille_\-. himself, for they were in- 
separable. He occupied a place on the ]datf(iini. it was 
said that he had become so familiar with the law that 
he did not always pay close attention, but would be 
times lapse into a nap. Xevertheless he alwavs a])]je:.r- 
ed to respect the dignity of the occasion r.nd to 1 e :n 



large measure responsi1)!e for it. (3n one occasion the 
rVofessor was called outside the lecture room for a 
moment, and the boys began to have a ""rough house." 
I!ob rose to the occasion, advanced to the front of the 
platform and began to command the peace in a \ er\ em- 
phatic ^•oice. but as soon as the Professor ap])eared he 
glanced at the door, retired to his ])lace and gracefuUv 
surrendered his authoritw 

He was "'one of the bovs :" and there was a l)ond 



«3 



of fellowship between them that was recognized on both 
sides. Occasionally he would get up during a lecture 
and take a stroll down through the audience, between 
the rows of chairs, the boys all giving him a love pat 
as he passed, and when he had made the rounds come 
back to his seat carrying the compliments of the boys 
with a pride that was manifest in every feature. 

So he was a figure in all the class pictures. No pic- 
ture was complete till Bob was in the group.. No set- 
ting was ready for a picture until the inquiry. "Where's 
Bob?" was answered. So his likeness has gone all over 
the state and his name is as familiar to "one of the boys" 
as any member of a class. 

I'.ob was the pink of a perfect dog. All that goes to 
make up an ideal dog, Bob inherited in a marked de- 
gree. In character, intelligence, and physical appear- 
ance he was all, and more, than a dog is expected to be. 

It would be difficult to suggest anything that might 
add to his physique to make him a perfect dog. He was 
a very picture with soft snowy white hair adorned with 
pronounced spots of black and tan artistically distribut- 
ed ; a graceful form not too large or too small ; a most 
expressive face and manner that bespoke intelligence of 
a rare degree, while every part of him, and every pose 
was expressive of animation, — a thing of life and a thing 
of beauty. 

Everybody was Bob's friend. It could not be other- 
wise. There was nothing vicious about him. He was 
of a sensitive nature, refined in his tastes, polite to every- 
body, responsive to every attention, considerate of every- 
body's comfort, intelligently observing everything that 
was passing about him, with a genuine appreciation of 
all that was said or done, and as affectionate as a girl. 



Nobody could look into^ Bob's face and watch its 
expression and believe that he was only a dog — within 
the common meaning of that word. 

During the current year Bob met an untimely death 
in the prime of life. He had been strangely absent from 
lectures for several days, so as to excite general inquiry 
among the boys, ^^'hat followed was reported in the 
Athenaeum of that date, which we herewith reproduce: 
A TRIBUTE TO BOB. 

Prof. 'Willey Pays a Tribute to His Best Friend. 

( Caught on the wing by a stenographer of the law 
school. ) 

At the close of his lecture to the law class on Mon- 
day, Prof. AA'illey said: 

"I'efore dismissing the class I want to take a mom- 
ent or two to refer to a long time member of the law de- 
partment who has recently retired. I should have re- 
fered to it before this but I could not trust myself. I 
can no longer loe silent and honor his memory as it de- 
serves. 

You all knew him, and I think }-ou all loved him. 
He has met with the law class here regularly for the last 
four years. He is known, and his name is familiar to 
the hundreds who have come in and gone out over the 
state. His face is familiar in all of the class pictures 
of that time. He was my best friend. 

"Bob has gone to heaven! 

"You say he was but a dog. But he was more than 
a dog. He was a noble character. There never was a 
better friend in the world — a truer, more loving friend 
in this world than Bob. He would have died for me. 

"For four years he was at my side almost every 
moment in the day except when I was absent from Mor- 



84 



gantown. He was the first person to greet me in the 
morning and the last to kiss me good-night — too p(.)lite 
to kiss my face, he stood up and gave my ear a lo^'ing 
lick and went wagging off to bed. His morning greet- 
ing was not that of the ordinary dog, but as courtly and 
warm and graceful as any seen in a drawing room — and 
more sincere. He knew that I was his friend and that 
he was my friend ; and that tie of friendship was as sure- 
ly \vritten in his soul as any words ever written in a 
book. 

"Yes, Bob was more than a dog. He was more in- 
telligent than some men — more s}-mpathetic. more ap- 
preciative, more responsive, more companionable in 
many ways. He was always interested in everything I 
did — observed it closely and intelligently, and showed 
his satisfaction witii the result. 

"He knew the English language as no other dog- 
ever did. I could talk to him with the same freedom that 
T would to a person. He looked me intentiv in the eve 
till he understood me perfectly If he were lying r)n the 
rug in the i)arIor and the con\-ersati()n turned on him he 
would raise his head and listen till he was satisfied. 1 
was sitting on the pavement in the warm summer e\en- 
ing and ]'>ob was begging me to take a walk with him. 
He persisted with much barking and tugging, while 1 
pushed him away saying it was too warm to walk. 
Presently I said, with a good deal of emphasis. '1 can"t 
go, Bob; I have no coat." He immediately turned about, 
went in the house, and ])resently, came trotting down 
stairs with mv coat in his mouth. Then I surrendered, 
and we walked. 

"Who that knew Bob did not recognize that he was 
more than a dog? Did anybr)dy ever see a more intelli- 
gent face in anv animal, man or beast? Did e\er an\- 



l)od_\- ever see see a thing of life, a more jerfecl, a more 
beautiful spcciuien of animal in all his parts? 

"And Bob was raised a genlleman. lie i)elonged to 
a distinguished famil}- of dogs in I'.allimorc — the most 
aristocratic family, it is said, in the state of .\lar\-land. 
And he was raised by one whom I esteem the most of a 
lady of all the l)eautiful ladies of that city. Why should 
he not have Ijeen a gentleman? ^'ou will I)ear me wit- 
ness that you have never seen IJol) guilt}- of an}- act of 
impoliteness that would oft'end the most fastidious in 
this present uv indeed any compau}- in the world. 

"I Io\ed that dog. because he was worthy of love. 
.\nd the more I compare hin-i with men. the more \ lo\-e 
and revere the niemory of Bob. And the man who gave 
ISob poison will go to a worse place than l!ob has gone. 
1 hope and l)elieve 1 will meet i'.ob somewhere in the 
great beyond; but I do not want to meet the n-ian whrt 
murdered him — we could not live in the same ])lace. 

"The other night B.ob was not in mv studv curled 
up at my feet as he usually was. I noticed that as an 
imusual thing. Al)out lo o'clock 1 heard him clamber- 
ing up the stairwav that leads to m\- studv. falling down 
and getting up by turn>. I thought some one had given 
him something to carr}- u]:) to me. ;is was fre(|uentlv 
done, and that he was haxing trouble with it. But I 
will never forget the ])athetic look he ga\e me as he en- 
tered the door and fell at m\ feet, lie was sick and had 
C(/me for help. He at once had all the helj) that one 
friend could gi\e another in an e.xtreiuity. i finally took 
hin-\ to the i)arlor, tiu-ned uj) the tire, and said, "l^ie here 
on the rug. Bob.' He lay down, turned up his eyes at 
i-i-ie and never renioved that jdeading look till suddenly 
he rose to his feet, staggered a few siei)s. lay dowri on 
his side, and with a little sluulder that beaiuifid crealiu-e 



85 



passed to some other clime. With my hand on his heart 
1 felt the final throb. And I said 'Good bye, Bob, I do 
not know where you have gone, but I will look for you, 
and search for you among the mysteries of the hereafter. 
It cannot be that so noble a creature is snuffed out like 
a candle.' " 




86 




87 



BURRELL KEMP LITTLEPAGE President 

KARL HARPER WEADON Vice-President 

BOYD MILFORD SMITH Secretary 

EVERETT LEON HOGGSETT Treasurer 

BANTZ WOODDELL CRADDOCK Historian 



Mtmhtxi. 



James Guy Allender. 

Van A. Barricl?man. 

Leo Carlin. 

Wilbur Earl Gather. 

B. P. Garrett. 

Marion Cha.mre Gilclirist. 

Eoy Olney Hall. 

Edward Frederick Hcrstmann. 

Adam Frederick Kisar 

V/. G. LavUle 

Austin Cook Merrill 

John Lawsettee Mollison 

Trevey Nutter. 

Boyd MiUord Smith. 

Herbert Earl Stansberry. 



Aaron Winer. 

Howard Curtis Barron. 

Frederick- Henry Brinlcman. 

M. Garibaldi Bufano. 

Hubert Garrett Crogan. 

David Arthur Cronin. 

E. F. Everhart. 

John Henry Habermehl. 

Justin Henderson. 

Roberr Simms Judge. 

JasF' r Newton Kee, Jr. 

Frank Wiicher McCullough. 

Roy Earl Parrish. 

Elliott Clyde Scott. 

Karl Harper Weadon. 



Wini\3zv^itv Court. 

DEAN CHARLES EDGAR HOGG Judge 

WAYNE KENNEDY PRITT Clerk 

BANTZ WOODDELL CRADDOCK Sheriff 




89 



r^^ Mentor i^ato Class! ^igtorp. €^ 



>N the third year of the reign of Charles E. Hogg, 

Dean of the College of Law, and in the first month 

^ thereof, and of the Satrapcy of Uriah Barnes the 

first year thereof — in those days came the choice 

men of the hill tribes, and the select men of the 

low lands. 

And when the tribesmen were assembled at the 
University, even at Morgantown, the leaders said one 
to another: Behold the class of 1907 did adopt the 
HONOR SYSTEM for their rule of conduct and it was 
good. Let us now, do even as they that our integrity 
might be above reproach and that men may know our 
high regard for the work whereunto we are called. And 
it was done. 

And the tribesmen were sorely tried by the rules of 
Satrap Uriah Barnes ; for that he did frequently admon- 
ish the tribesmen that if they did not yet have a ]jur- 
pose in life "for God's sake to get one". AA'hereas they 
knew the purpose of their coming and deserved not the 
admonition. And he did constantly preach to the tribes- 
ilien of the dignit}- of their high calling; so Uiat tlie 
tribesmen were ofl-'ended in him, and there was war be- 
tween the tribesmen and vSatrap Urian Barne.s. From 
the first month of the reign ol the satrap c\en to the 
ninth month thereof was there war. Then there was 
peace. 

And when the time was come for the second gath- 
ering of the tribesmen at the University, even at Mor- 
gantown, peace dwelt in the land and happiness and 
prosperity went as maidens, hand in hand. 

There is a feeling abroad in the Universitv that lie- 



cause the law students sometimes exercise their lungs 
in other ways than by making speeches to the "gentle- 
men of the jury" that they are a band of "ne'er-do-wells", 
lacking in dignity and without a fixed purpose in life. It 
is not the object of the writer to apologize for the Senior 
Law Class. Instead he desires to call the reader's atten- 
tion to a few facts and let him draw his' own conclusions. 

The Lresident of the L'ni\-ersity Y. ]\I. C. A. is a 
law student. ISoth presidents of the literary societies 
for the fall term and the president of one for the winter 
term were members of the Senior Law Class. The presi- 
dent of the Dramatic Club is a member of the Senior 
Law Class. The editor-in-chief of the Athenaeum and 
one 01 the associate editors of the Monongalian are 
n.icmbers of the Senior Law Class. Five of the literary 
society contestants are members ol' the c^^enior Law 
Class. One 'X'arsitv Foot-ball plaA-er and two A'"arsit1 
base-ball players are members of the Senior I^aw Class. 

I\lany of the teachers whose intellects command the 
admiration of their students, but few are there for whom 
iheir students feel a real and sincere aft'ection. Dean 
Hogg is both admired and lo\-ed by e^■erv member of 
this class. The genius of his clear mind has been our 
inspiration and made to thrill with life and human inter- 
est, subjects which might ha\e proven dr}- and tedious. 
His kindly interest and ever present sympathy in our 
work has brightened our student lives. Tho tireless in 
his own labors, he has never been too busy to hear our 
often trivial cpiestions or to help us in our difficulties. 
"HISTORIAN." 



90 



Clasis! ([Officers!. 

ALBERT JOHN KERN President 

ROBERT MOSS FRENCH Vice-President 

LEWIS A. STAKBR Secretary 

CHARLES E. MILLER Treasurer 



Clagg laoU. 



Harry William King, Jr. 

Charles William Louchery. 

Kemble T. Manning. 

L. L. McClure. 

Charles E. Miller. 

Rudolph Munk. 

G. C. Powell. 

Fisher Scaggs. 

C. R. Morgan. 

W. L. Poling. 

Thomas West. 

J. B. Wyatt. 

Edward S. Bock. 

Francis Willard Steele. 

A. P. Hudson. 

H. A. Bolin 



Guy Herman Burnside. 

A. J. Dailey. 

Carl C. Douthitt. 

C. T. Enlow. 

Boyce Ray Fitzgerald. 

S. L. Flournoy 

G. H. Gunnoe 

.r. V. Hall. 

W. H. Hensley. 

G. F. Hedges. 

H. B. Hinds. 

L. F. Ice. 

Lewis A. Staker. 

Robert Moss French. 

Albert John Kern. 



92 




93 



accordance with the iisag'e; 
tioned from time immemorial 



and customs, sane- 
it l^ecomes mv duty 



'Tc) to contribute a history of tlie junior Law Class to 
the Monticola. Trembling under the terrible res- 
ponsibilities of the task of doing justice to the 
memory of this famous organization, I take the ]ien of 
Herodotus in hand with a prayer for the sjjecial aid of 
Clio. Time would fail me to relate them and all the 
pages of this book would not contain them, were I to 
attempt to record all the memorable e\-ents in tlie life 
of this class; so I shall have to be content with the men- 
tion of but a few. 

Last September when the leaves were turning to 
purple and gold, the promptings of the s|:irits of about 
forty souls bade their possessors knock at the ])ortals of 
the College of Law of the Old Gold and iSlue for ad- 
mittance to drink at the fountains of the knowledge of 
Blackstone. Our wills having confirmed the summons, 
without a capias, we appeared, in the due course of time, 
without laches, to learn the ap])lications of the legal 
maxims, "Ignorantium leges nemine e.xcusat", "proxima 
causa, non remota, spectatur", et cetera (as Cicero would 
mouth it), and a few other things. From the hills and 
valleys, the fields and cities, from the schools of theory 



and the schools of experience, from farm, ofiice, factory, 
and mines of the grand old war-born state of AVest Vir- 
ginia and neighboring Commonwealths we came, — hear- 
ing the \()ice of tlie Mistress of the Law, we came to 
woo, and i;erchance to win her! When we all got here 
we f(jund ouisehes to lie big and little, small and large; 
eyes that were l)ro\\n, blaclc, gray, and blue; hair from 
the black and straight to the red and wa\y, the kind the 
girls ra\'e about. 

After going through the red tape of matriculation, 
I he cross cjuestions and silly answers without false pre- 
tenses, and having been "touched" for the usual fees, 
we assemlded for the first classes. "The class will please 
be in order" : it was the \oice of our beloved Dean 
Hogg, lie then began and so continueth to unfold to 
us the beauties of the common and statutory law. We 
were next introduced to Professor A\'illey, who looked 
ns o\-er with critical eve, sizing us up intuitively to be 
an exceptionally fine set of fellows. He "broke the ice" 
by telling one of his fauKius anecdotes which made the 
room ring whh laughter, and did much toward making 
ns feel at home. Then we met Professor L'riah EJarnes 
under who've able direction we soon began to wax strong 
in the peculiar branches in which he is the instructor. 



94 



He has made us familiar with every decision in criminal 
law from Adam's Hrst transgression down to the Age 
and 'I'imes uf Theodore I and ■'IJillv" I'.rvan, the siher- 
tongued orator of the Platte. "Uill'" Taft. Aldrich, Till- 
man, "Steve" Elkins. and "L'ncle Joe" Cannon. We 
noticed another instructor of pleasant manner in the 
College of Law, and upon inquiry found him to be Pro- 
fessor J. R. Trotter, of whom by closer contact in the 
winter term we grew quite fond. 

]n the course of about two weeks a meeting of the 
class was called for the purpose of electing officers. 
There were vigorous contests for each ])lace with the 
results appearing on another page of this Ijook. 

'JMie class by its individual members has distinguish- 
ed itself in nearly every phase of University life. In 
fact rhe presence of menii/ers of tlie Junior Law Cass in 
an atl'air marks it a success by conclusive presimiption. 
What would the L'ni^ ersity be without the Junior Law 
Class of 1909-10? It woiTld be as the fields without 
flowers and emblements, as a musical comedy without 
•the principals and churns. In athletics great are its 
achievements I It gave to the world the mighty footliall 
heroes. — ]\Iunk and W'oodhouse. Then there is Charley 
Louchery. the great cheer leader and "thuser." ( )n the 
baseball diamond, we ha\e "Fattv" WAatt. Charle\- Mil- 



ler. "A'oung" ]{nlow. Skaggs. liensley. and ad intinitum. 
!n the school band _\ou"ll find 1 lines. It ga\e to the 
Dramatic Club. "Puck" King and "Judge" Kern, two 
stars in the realms ni Thes])is. 

You can tell which picture is ours wiiliout reading 
the caption by looking for the most intelligent and best 
looking l.'unch herein contained. 

During the year v.-e observed two e.\tra-si)ecial holi- 
days; one to have our ])ictures taken, and the other in 
honor of the cadets on the occasion of the Military Ball. 
"That's fair enough." 

We ha\'e been diligent in ^tudy and shall therefore 
>tand before kings, as sayeth the hoi}- writ. We. of 
course. ha\e had our ups and downs. 1)ut ha\e little cause 
for c(>m])laint. The death of "Pob." Profosor Willey's 
gentlemanly dog who was an honorar\- member of the 
class cast some shadow but there has I)een much >un- 
shine. 

In the future I can see the might}- works to be ac- 
complished hv the meml)ers of this class, the jjositions 
of honor. ])roht, service, confidence, and trust they are 
to fill in the body ])()litic and the large infiuence they 
are to wield; but 1 must pause for by strict construction 
I am tresspassing on the office of the prophet. Selah. 



95 



'Opt)omorc Jlebical Class!. 



Class Officers. 



CECIL O.AIAR POST President 

HARRY LESLIE STILPHEX Vice-President 

J. S. CRAIG Secretary 

EVERETT ROY COOPER Treasurer 

GEORGE VAXE SCOTT Historian 

Class aaou. 

Arthur Aquilla Brindley. Harry Leslie Stilphen. 

Charles Calvin Ryan. J. S. Craig. 

Samuel John Morris. Everett Roy Cooper. ' 

G. B. Wheeler. Georap Vanp Scott. 
Cecil Omar Post. 



87 



Jf resiftman jHebical Clasisi 

Clasis; O^fficerg. 

CLAUDE DEWIS HAMILTON President 

TRUMAN ELROY VASS Vice-President 

HARRY COFFMAN . Secretary 

EUSTACE THOMAS GOFF Treasurer 



Clasig a^oU. 



Ray Maxwell Babbitt. 
Thomas Floyd Ernest Be 
Walter S. Bambrick. 
John Augustus Sanders. 
.James Garfield Coles. 
Truman Elroy Vass 
John George Brennan. 



R. J. StocK'hammer. 
Constantine C. Psaki. 
Paul Jenkins Frazier. 
Clarence James Prickett. 
Homer Willard Grimm. 
Alvis Peters. 



department of Commerce. 



DENNIS MARTIX WILLIS Head of Department 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING Assistant 



enrollment. 



Guy Vandervort Bailey 
Delia L. Barker 
Fred H. Burdett 
Nellie R. Cunningham 
Mary A. Chalmers 
Priscilla Cole 
Cora Comley 
Rebecca Core 

lona Blanche Deusenberry 
Mary Jettie Deusenberry 
Irl Noel Duling 
Orton Everett Duling 
Jessie Romaine Glover 
Sara R. Garlow 
Newton Haggerty 
James Lawrence Hanford 
Anna Belle Hedrich 
Robert L. Hogg 
Mrs. Cora A. Hogsett 
Texie E. Hughes 
Maude E. Irvin 
Leonard Nimrod John, Jr 
Roy Jarrett Jamison. Jr. 
Daniel C.Keighron 
Anna B. King 



Lawrence S. Lewellen 
Sullivan iNIascioli 
Frank JIadera Morgan 
Elsie M. Norm.an 
Carl Newbrough 
Bertha L. Pixler 
Grady Pearcy 
Ruby A. Rogers 
Minerva Shelby 
Bernard W. Schenerlein 
Georgia A. Semans 
Allan H. Striebich 
Scott Swisher 
Lulu L. South 
Janet A. Thomas 
Sue Utt 

Sallie Shields Wade 
Martha Waters 
Noel P. Weaver 
Homer Webb 
Jackson Charles Wells 
Bessie Pearl Winter 
Elsie L. Winter 
Hazel E. Yarger 
French Arlington Yoke 



99 







p^^'^n 


Br 










^c^ 




H 


[iil 


^m^ 




J 


r 




^ 


1 


8 






F'.'^dH^V^^ "^^BS 


1 
1 


i 


.^ 


iWp 


^^ 


. --T^- 

^ 


Xm 


k 


H^B ' ^^9 


ift 'A 


['••ff.J 


' c^ ^ 


^^u^ ^ Hfr^ 


it 


B J 


Eu^^KH 


^H '^''^'^^fl 


L^ia^^ 


W 


JL " 


t^^ J^> 


f- 


1 ' 


w^M 


1^ 


i^^S;^ 


r ■ ■''^l 


^;\^ 


; 111 




^ 


^ 


■- - . ^ \ 


'^ 


■' ' , 


^^^^ 


■' ' ■■ '•' -^ ' ■ 


^W-^ <i '^ ^c^ 








1 


B^ 


ii 




WW. 


1 


k 


%: 






^'i /I 


\i 


II 








,^^^|^H^^ 






k \ 


\ 






^^^^^ 


■*HI 


■. 


..^.v*- 


■^•'t ,^disL'-^ 


r^^^^l..~'-*^imf. 


•t^-i 


•-.^ 


iJRIBp^ 




MiwEaMg^r^ 






■Ml 


Jnai^i^l 





isi i;..\v— Miss 



liiul How— .Missc: 
.•!r(l Row— Messi- 
ah Rcw— Mcssi- 



Wells. .Misses llniiii 



Wii.le lliiylies 



.Miss .\(,riiiaii, I'n. 
Winter. Pi.xler. 
111(1 Mr. Hortsinani 



t'essur Kin^'. Miss C'uiiuiiigliiuu. 




101 



YOU YOUNG FOLKS THINK WE OLD FOLKS 
ARE FOOLS: WE OLD FOLKS KNOW YOU 
YOUNG FOLKS ARE FOOLvS— BECAUSE WEA^E 
BEEN THERE. 

DR. REYNOLDS IN CHAPEL. 



102 






^^-*««.. 



Here/"-to-'the-L^ncl-qf» L^LireL-anc)-PLne, 
VYhei'e-A\en-are«trc5vve- avncL 'Women* Divine. 

Where 'Honor^T^ath' and'Love* m^vke-^^e^(^: 

De2v\- •West -Vir^^inta -the •A\ountc\in ^ 3tc\te. 

w 




103 



TO THE CO-ED. 

Come, fill to the brim ; here's a toast to the Gown ! 
Here's to the coed with merry bine eye, and here's to the 

charmer with gray. 
And here's to the one that is backward and shy, and 

here's to the one that is gay. 
Here's to the cold. 
Here's to the scold. 
Here's to the duck and the dove, 
llere's to the slender. 
Indeed, the whole gender. 
It's the whole blessed bunch that I love! 
Drink, drink, drink, drink her down. 



'OLD GOLD AND BLUE.' 



TO "MOUNTAIN DEW!' 



And however we I'lay may we profit by our own and 
others' mistakes, always remaining loval to "Old Gold 
and Blue". 

Will you then, gentlemen, arise and join me in the 
toast and health. — 

Fill with sparkling "dew" your glasses, 
Drink to knowledge and to the true. 
Drink to love and joy and pleasure. 
All beneath "Old Gold and Blue." 

—PROF. EMORY. 



"Here's a health, my 1:)rother! 
Friendshi]^, beauty, truth, 
Love that thrills the bosom, 
Flope that beckons youth, — 
Pledge them all together, 
All that's fair and true, — 
Hands all round, my brothers, 
Here's to 'Mountain Dew' ". 



'A woman is only a woman, but a cigar is a good smoke." 
104 




105 




f unior J^rogram Committee. 



Glenn Hunter John Lowrie Robinson 

Pearl Louise Reiner Francis Willard Steele 

Helen Merwin Weistling Moses Stark Donnally 
Clara Elizabeth Dickason. 



106 



J^cosram for Junior Wnk. 



Monday Evening', ]\Ia\- i(). — Junior Smoker. 

Tuesday Afternoon and Exenini;-. .Ma}- 17. — May 
Festival. 

\\'ednesdav Aflernoiui and Evening;-, Mav 18. — Jun- 
ior Picnic at Oak I'ark. 

Thursda\- Afternoon, May n;. — Washington and 
Jefiferson I'aseball Game. 

Friday Afternoon. ]\Ia\- .o — Washington and Jeffer- 
son Baseball Game. 

Friday Evening. May 20.— JL'XIOR PROM. 

Saturday Afternoon. May 21. — Washington and 
leii'erson I'.aseball Game. 



107 



'^^i e'A) ' v-f 







.^^'f 



ry'\ 



v^ 



^V-^K 











(. 'lr>^,: ^ vr- - 



JUNIOR PICNIC. 



108 




JUNIOR SMOKER. 



109 




JUNIOR PROM. 



110 




113 




^anJIellenic Bance Committee. 

CHARLES WILLIAM LOUCHERY, President, 2 X 

FRANK WITCHER McCULLOUGH, Vice President, * K ^I' 

JAY EDGAR BILLINGSLEY Treasurer, S * E 

EDGAR BOYLE SPBE/ Secrnary, ATA 

GEORGE HUNTER HARRIS, B T n 
MIFFLIN MARSH WATKINS, <I> K S 
ARTHUR AQUIL1.A BRINDLEY, 2 N 
WALTER WARREN POINT, Jr., K A 
GROVE R CLEVELAND LEMLEY, * S K 
ROGER EARL WATSON, n K A 



114 




U5 





116 








PRESSING HIS SUIT. 





WHAT A DIFFERENCE A FEW HOURS MAKF. 

118 



f^<^V 



r 






119 




; m^,' -^^^-:^^.x- ^:.^^-^.^;^^-.^>^:.^ - 



Fouiidt'd at Jefl'ersoii College, 1852 

COLORS 

Pink and Lavender 

FLOWER 

Sweet Pea 



121 



OTiesit "Virginia ^Ipfta Chapter 



Established May 23rcl, 1890 



Fratres in Urbe 



Reverend A. M. Buchanan. 
Gilbert B. Miller. 
Joseph K. Buchanan. 



A. Ford Dickey. 
Forest W. Stemple. 



Fratres in Facilitate 



Frederick Wilson Truscott. 
William Patrick Willey. 
Lloyd Lowndes Friend. 



Madison Stathers. 
James Kussell Trotter. 



■"faties in Universitate 
1910 



Leroy Holmer Morris. 
Frederick Rost Koelz. 
Robert Murray Gawthrop. 
James Roy Eckman. 



John Clirisler Evans. 
Frank Witcher McCuUough. 
Austin Cook Merrill, 
i.odney Milton Stemple. 



Arthur Brown Hodges. 
David Bright Reger. 



Robert Sidney Reed. 



George Vane Scott. 
Clark Francis Pool. 
F. B. Lewellyn. 



Thomas Wilmer Crawford. 
John James Kennedy. 
Thomas Roach McMinn. 



George R. Jackson. 
John M. McGill. 



Charles E. Hodges. 
Roy L. Jones. 



122 



0MOO 



4#000d 



123 



aaoU of attiUe chapters 



Washington and Jefferson College. 

Bucknell UniA-ersity. 

Dickinson College. 

LaFayette College. 

Swarthmore College. 

Amherst College. 

Cornell University. 

Columbia University 

John Hopkins University. 

University of Virginia. 

West Virginia University. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Ohio State University. 



University of Indiana. 
University of Ulinois. 
Northwestern University. 
University of Wisconsin. 
University of Minnesota. 
University of Kansas. 
University of Missouri. 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 
Case School of Applied Science. 
Allegheny College. 
Gettysburg College. 
Franklin and Marshall College. 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Dartmouth College. 



Brown University. 

Syracuse University. 

Colgate University. 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. 

Washington and Lee University. 

University of Mississippi. 

University of Texas. 

Wittenberg University. 

De Pauw University. 

University of Chicago. 

University of Michigan. 

Beloit College. 

University of Iowa. 

University of Nebraska. 




PHI KAPPA PSI HOUSE 
124 



^v" 




^f)i ^igma i^appa 

Fouiuled 1873 

COLORS 

Silver and Magenta 



125 



©elta Chapter 

Established February 24, 1? 



Fratres in Urbe 



Walter H. South. 
Theopilus Sutton Boyd. 
William Mount Sivey. 
Arthur Lee Boyers. 
Prescott C. White. 
David C. Reay. 
Cassius M. Lemly. 
Edgar B. Stewart. 



Terence D. Stewart. 
David Campbell Garrison. 
James Carroll Prazer. 
Frank S. Bowman. 
Frank Batson Kunst. 
Robert W. Fisher (Eta). 
John Leps. 



Fratres in Facultate 



Russell Love Morris 
Harry Anthony Eaton 
Clement Ross Jones 
Dennis Martin Willis 



Grover Cleveland Lemley 
Harry Anthony Eaton 
Bantz Wooddell Craddock 



James H. Stewart 
John Behny Grumbein 
Benjamin Walter King 



in Universitate 

Jasper Newton Kee, Jr. 
LeVega Washington Burns 
Trevey Nutter 



Walter L. Pipes 
George Truman Twyford 

Thomas Clyde Pitzer 



Earl Pearcy 

James Harrison Riddle 



1912 



Jackson VanBuren Blair, Jr. 
Fred Earl Vandale 
Grover Foster Hedges 
Benjamin Walter King 



Harold Marr 



Edgar Duval Bromley 
Walter Gaskins 
George Bonnie Wheeler 
Van Wagener Gilson 

1913 

Claude Dewis Hamilton 



126 



99800 



]27 



EoU of ^ctibe Chapters;. 



Massachusetts Agriculture College 

Union University 

Cornell University 

West Virginia University 

Yale University 

College of the City of New York 

University of Maryland 

Columbia University 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

Pennsylvania State College 

George Washington University 

Lehigh University 



St. Lawrence University 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 
Franklin and Marshall College 
Queen's College (Canada) 
St. John's College 
Dartmouth College 
Brown University 
Swarlhmore College 
Williams College 
University of Virginia 
University of California 
University of Pennsylvania 



Alumni Clubs;. 



New York Club Boston Club 

Ubany Club Connecticut Club 

Southern Club VIorgantown Club 

Philadelphia Club 



128 



^igma Cf)i. 



Founded at Miaina I iiiveisity, Ohio, 1855 

COLORS 

Old Gold and Sky Blue 

FLOWER 

White Rose 



129 



Ma jWu Cfjapter. 



Established May 18, 1895 
Fratres in Urbe 



Howard Llewelyn Swishei' 
Joseph Henry McDermott 
Jean Val.iean Cooke 
Michael Eugene Gorman 
Boaz Baxter Cox 
Paul Hermans Martin 
McLaren Bryden 
John Arndt Yount 



C. Edmund Neil 



Alexander Gordon Tait 
John Hoffman Schissler 
John Alden Purinton 
C. Everett Casto 
L. D. Arnett 
Justin M. Kunkle 
Leonard Tobin 

Fratres .in Facilitate 

Frederick Lawrence Kortright 



Fratres in Uuiversitate 
1910 



Charles William Louchery 
Richard Jay Gould 
Carl Cassman Yount- 
William Sidney Laidley, Jr. 



Ralph Thomas Thayer 
Justin Henderson 
Koy Earl Parrish 
Burrell Kemp Littlepage 



1911 

Stanley Rhey Cox Lewis A. Staker 

1912 

Corwin Sage Burns George Morris Oshorn 



Prank R. Amos 
D. Lamont Cardin 



John Tait 
Wayne Cox 




0Q@©0 



a\ 



131 



EoU of Cfjaptersi. 



Fii'st Province 

Pennsylvania College 
Bucknell University 
Dickinson College 
LaFayette College 
Lehigh University 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Pennsylvania 

Second Province 

University of Virginia 

George Washington University 

Washington and Lee University 

TliJid Province 

West Virginia University 

University of Cint-innati 

University of Michigan 

Case School of Applied Science 

Western Reserve University 

Albion College 

Ohio State University 

Missouri University 

University of Wooster 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Dennison University 



Fourth Pro\ince 

Indiana L'^niversity 
De Pauw University 
Butler College 
Hanover College 
Purdue University 
Wabash College 

Fifth Province 

Northwestern University 
Beloit College 
Illinois Wesleyan University 
University of Wisconsin 
Uni\ersity of Minnesota 
University of North Dakota 
University of Illinois 
University of Chicago 

Sixth Province 

University of Nebraska 
State University of Iowa 
University of Kansas 
Colorado College 
University of Missouri 
Washington University 



Seventh Province 

State University of Kentucky 
Central University of Kentucky 
Vanderbilt University 



Eiglith Province 

University of California 
University of Southern California 
Leland Stanford, Jr. University 
University of Montana 
University of Utah 
University of Washington 



Ninth Province 

Syracuse University 

University of Maine 

University of Columbia 

Dartmouth College 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology. 

Cornell University 

Hobart College 



Tenth Province 

University of Mississippi 
University of Texas 
Tulane University 
University of Arkansas 

132 



^ti Sappa feigma. 

Foimrtod at I'liivt'isity of I'tiinsylvania, IS,")!* 

COLOKS 

Old Gold and Black 



^Ipta #amma Chapter. 



Established 1890 



Edward iMiller Grant 
Roy V. Hennen 
John Gilmore Ross 
David Hott, Jr. 
Harry John Zevely 
Edward Gregg Donley 
Theodore J. Arthur 



Pratres in Urbe 

Samuel Grove Chadwick, Ji 
John Leisure Hatfield 
Charles William Held 
Charles James Hogg 
Charles Stephan White 
Lewis Dunn Beall (Delta) 
T. Richard Ely (Delta) 



Charles Edgar Hogg 



Pratres in Pacultate 

Thomas Bond Foulk 



Edward Frederick Horstman 
Irving Hayne Moran 
Karl Harper Weadon 



in Vniversitate 
1910 

Donald Ross 

Benett Randolph Bias 



Glenn Hunter 

George Harold Cummins 

Phinney Porter Thomas Reiner 

Frank Phillips Best 



lohn Henry Robinson 
Harry William King, Jr. 
Edgar Reed Lang 



Mifflin Marsh Watkins 
James Jackson Turner 



Marl Keenan 



Clyde Charles Pugh 



1913 

John Howard Holt, 



is\ 



EoU of ^ctibe Cfjapterg. 



University of Pennsylvania 
Washington and Jefferson College 
Dicl<inson College 
Franklin and Marshall College 
University of Virginia 
Columbian University 
Tulane University 
University of Illinois 
Fandolph-i\Iacon College 
Richmond College 
Pennsylvania State College 
Washington and Lee University 
West ^'■irginia University 



University of IMaine 
Armour Institute of Technology 
University of Maryland 
University of Wisconsin 
/anderbilt University 
University of Alabama 
University of California 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 
lleorgia School of Technology 
Purdue University 
University of Michigan 
University of Chicago 
Northwestern University 



136 



^appa ^Iptja. 

[SOUTHERN] 
Foiiiuled at Washinjitdii and I.ee University. 186" 



Crimson and Old Gold 
FLOWKU 

Red Rose and Magnolia. 



137 



mpija Mo Cfjapter. 



Established March 10, 



189^ 



Dell Roy Richards 
William J. Siiee 
A.ltlia Warman 
James Rogers Morelar 



Aretas Wilbur Nolan 



Roy Olney Hall 
Verd Peterson 
Robert Simms Judge 



Earnest Bell 

Earle Woddell Sheets 

James Evans Dille 



Fratres in Uibe 

Leroy Taylor 
Thomas t ay Dille 
Thomas Edwai'd Hodges 

Fratres in P'acultate 

Robert Allen Armstrong 

Fratres in Universitsite 
1910 

Adam Fred-^rick Kisar 
Edward Curtis Oldham 
Walter Warren Point 



191 



Charles George Baker 
Hu Swisher Vandervort 



Asa Williams Adkins 



Verner Vadis Law 
lohn D. Courtney 
Ed. L. Kyle 



1912 

Otto Dale Elscn 
1913 

James Cornwall Allen 
Richard R. Feller 



138 




139 



aaoU of ^ttibe Cijapterg. 



Washington and Lee University 
University of Georgia 
Wofford College 
Emory College 
Randolph-Macon College 
Richmond College 
University of Kentucky 
Mercer University 
University of Virginia 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Southwestern Univ. Georgetown, 
University of Texas 
University of Tennessee 
Davidson College 
University of North Carolina 
Southwestern Univ. Greensboro, 
Vanderbilt University 
Tulane University 
Central University of Kentucky 
University of the South 
University of Alabama 
Louisiana State University 
William Jewell College 
William and Mary College 
Westminster College 



Transylvania University 

Kentucky University 
-University of IMissouri 

Johns Hopkins University 

Millsaps College 

George Washington University 

University of California 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

University of Arkansas 

Georgia School of Technology 
Tex. West Virginia University 

Hampden-Sidney College 

University of Mississippi 

Trinity College 

North Carolina A. & M. College 
Ala. Missouri School of Mines 

Bethany College 

College of Chaiieston 

Georgetown College 

Delaware College 

University of Florida 

University of Oklahoma 

Washington University 

Drury College 



140 






^1 



^^,„„. -f* 



i^^^m^'^--*^' ■^'^ ' .--x'rhJflik?:**' 



JBdta ^au Mtlta. 



Founded 18r>!) 



COI^OKS 

Purplp, White and Geld 



FLOWKIt 

Pansy 



141 



(gamma ISelta Chapter. 

Established 3Iay 24th, 1!)00 

Praties in Vrbe 

George C. Stuigiss (Delta Prime) James D. Gronninger ("06) 
Joseph Moreland (Gamma) Ross C. Shriver CO!) 

James L. Callard (Kappa) Shelby Taylor 

Frank P. Corbln COl) P. L. McKeel 

Willey S. John ('02) 

Praties in Paciiltate 

Simeon C. Smith (Beta Mu) 

Praties in Universitate 

inio 

John Lawsettee Mcllison Arthur Melville Jacobs 

Moses Starlv Donnally Edward S. Bock 

Bernard Lee Hutchison Guy Herman Burnside 

Clay Dillie Amos Carl C. Douthitt 

1912 

Joseph Krarse Grubb Edgar Boyle Speer 

Cecil Omar Post Duffey Flcyd 

1!)13 

Paul Jolliffe Hcm.er Gail Garlow 



142 




DELTA TAU DELTA HOUSE 



Southern Division 

Vanderbilt University 
University of Mississippi 
Wasliington and Lee University 
Emory College 
University of tlie Soutli 
University of Virginia 
Tulane University 
George Washington University 
University of Texas 

AVestern Division 

University of Iowa 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of Colorado 
Northwestern University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Illinois 



iaoU of ^ctibe Cljapters;. 

University of California 
University of Chicago 
Armour institute of Technology 
Baler Liniversity 
University of Missouri 
(Jniversity of Washington 

Northern Division 

Ohio University 
University of iMichigan 
Albion College 
Western Feserve 
Hillsdale College 
Indiana University 
De Panw University 
University of Indianapolis 
Ohio State University 
Wabash College 
Wooster University 
West Virginia University 
Perdue University 



Ohio Wesleyan University 
Kenyon College 
CTniversity of Cincinnati 

Kastern Division 

Allegheny College 

Washington and Jefferson College 

LaFayette College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

University of Pennsylvania 

Lehigh University 

Tufts College 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

Cornell University 

Brown University 

Dartmouth College 

Columbia University 

Wesleyan University 

University of Maine 



144 



Founded at Miaiiia Inlversity, 1839 



COLORS 

Light Shade of Blue and Pink 



FLOWER 

Pink Rose 



145 



Wt^t "Virginia peta Psii Ctjapter. 

!:s(al)lished Sept. lotli, 1!)()1) 

Fi-atres in Vibe 

Fred C. Pienniken A. W. Lorentz 

VV. H. Kendrifk C. K. Jenness 
R. C. PiMce 

Frati't's in Facnltate 

Albert Mcore Eeese W'ailman T. Barbe 

Fraties in Universitatt' 

Leo Carliii Cecrge Hunter Harris 

George William Allison Wayne Kennedy Pritt 

Herbert Earl Stansberry 

Lory Francis Ice Harry Lucas Campbell 

Lewis Lietoh Wilson John Lee Grayson 

Clark Culbertson Burritt 

1»12 

William Brightwell Jordan Harry Alexander Kear 

iloscoe Reeves Eoscoe Parriott Posten 

1913 

A. H. Peters D. C. McCreery 

H. R. Tucker J. Y. York, Jr. 



146 



60900 

OOOO^d 



147 



EoU of ^ctibe Chapters!. 



Amherst 

Bostcii 

Bowdriii 

Brov n 

Darti.:outh 

Maine 

Columbia 

Futgers 

Stevens 

Wesleyan 

Yale • 

Davidson ^ ^^^ 

Hampden-Si(iney^T% 

North Carolina 

Virginia 

Central 

Texas 

Missouri 

Oklahoma 

Washington 

Westminster 

California 

Stanford 



Colgaie 

Cornell 

St. liawrence 

Syracuse 

Toronto 

Union 

Dicl-inson 

Johns Hopkins 

Kenyon 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Vanderi)ilt 

Bethany 

Cincinnati 

;\Iiami 

Ohio University 

Ohio Sta+e 

West Vi iinia 

Belcit 

Was:''ngton State 

ChicaTo 

Illinois 

Knox 

^lichig;'n 



Western Reserve 

Wooster 

De Pauw 

Hanover 

Indiana 

Purdue 

Wabash 

Lehigh 

Pennsylvania 

Pennsvlvania State College 

Wash in '"ton & Jefferson 

Wittenleig 

Case 

Colorado 

Denver 

Kansas 

Northwestern 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Iowa State 

Iowa Wesleyan 

Nebraska 

Dennison 



148 



Founded at l?iohiiiond College, Virginia, 1901. 

COLORS 

Purple and Red 

FLOWER 

Red Eose and Violet 



149 



^amma Betn CfDltapt^t* 



Oayloi'd Dent. 
George W. Price. 
Guy Baxter Hartley. 



Harry Riiffner Wiley 

Charles Moon 

.Jay Edgar TJillincsloy 



.J. B. Wyatt 

Herman Deidl^r Porock 



Charles Bruce Wilson 
Harry Grove Wheat 
Walter Greig Crichton 



Fratre.s in Urbe. 

Alexander Deacon Bell. 
Ernest Claude Plxler. 

Ires ill Universital«. 
1910. 

Edgar Lewis Swearingen 
Frank Reeves 

1911. 

Claude Spray Tetrick 
C. E. Miller 

1912. 

Harman Haller Kerr 

E. Y. ]\lcVey 

Walter Bruce Bradley 



Enimett Conner Baker 



1913. 

J. D. Hitter 



150 



*^y 



000&60 



151 



3aoU of actibe Ctjapterg. 

Richmond College. Randolph-Macon College 

West Virginia University Georgia School of Technology 

Jefferson Medical College Delaware College 

University of Pittsburg University of Virginia 

University of Illinois University of Arkansas 

University of Colorado Lehigh University 

University of Pennsylvania Virginia Military Institute 

William and Mary College Ohio State University 
North Carolina College of Agricul Norwich University 

ture and Mechanical Arts. Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Ohio Northern University Trinity College 

Purdue University Dartmouth College 

Syracuse University George Washington University 
Washington and I^ee University 

ALUMNI CHAPTEKS 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania Norfolk, Virginia. 



152 



^isma i^u. 



Founded at Virginia >Jilitai'y Institute, 1809. 

COLORS 
Black, White and Gold 

FLOWER 

The White Rose 



153 



CSamma flttl Cliapter. 



Robert Rodman Green 
Franklin Marion Brand 



Kstablished February 124th, 1904 

Lucas 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Arliuir M. 



Thomas Shaffer Patterson 
Archie Huff Bullard 



Fratres in Vniversitate. 
1910 

Elliott Clyde Scott 



Arthur Aquilla Brindley 
George Columbus Starcher 
Harry Cooper Stulting 



B. H. Beardsley 
Wirt Gerry Faust 



John LeiTian Miller 
Robert Vance Duncan 
T.loyd Camden Gibson 



Robert Moss French 
Lonnie Watterson Ryan 
Harlan H. Reynolds 

1912. 

Logan McDonald 
Robert Clifton Grogg 

1913. 

Raymond E. Clark 
Thomas Hale Erwin 
Ploward E. Weiss 



154 




155 



University of Virginia 

University of Georgia 

University of Alabama 

Howard College 

North Georgia Agriculture College 

Washington & Lee University 

Bethany College 

Mercer University 

University of Kansas 

Emery College 

Lehigh College 

University of Missouri 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Louisiana State University 

Cornell College 

Georgia School of Technology 

I'nivfrsity of Washington 

Northwestern University 

University of Vermont 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

University of Colorado 



EoU of ^ctibc Ctaptersf. 

University of \\'iscGnsin 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Missouri Schools of M. & M. 
Washington University 
West Virginia University 
Dartmouth College 
Western Reserve University 
University of Nebrasl^a 
Washington State University 
Uni\ersity of North Carolina 
Tulane University 
DePauw University 
Alabama Polytpchni'- Insfilute 
Purdue University 
Ohio Slate Uni\ersity 
Leland Stanford University 
Lombard University 
Indiana University 
Mount Union College 
University of California 
University of Iowa 



Williams Jewell College 

Carolina College of Agriculture and 

Mechanical Arts 
Rose Polytechnical Institute 
Albion College 
LaFayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
State College of Kentucky 
University of Chicago 
Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
ITniversity of Arkansas 
University of Montana 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
University of Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State College 
Virginia Military Institute 
Oklahoma University 



156 



Sriicta ilu ipsiloiK 



I at Wcsleyaii riii\cisitj . 

COLOKS 

Green and Black 



157 



^I^eta Jlu UpsVon. 



Justin M. Kunkle 
Harry John Zevely 
Albert Ford Dickey 
Gilbert Benton Miller 



Fratrt's in Urbi". 

C. Everett Casto 
Charles A. Fowler 
Scott Biddle 
Robert Cole Price 



C. Edmund Neil 



in FiK'ultate. 

John Nathan Simpson. 



Carl Cassman Yount 
Richard Jay Gould 
John Lee Core 
Burrell Kemp littlepage 
Dave Harman Kahn 
Lewis Smith Core 
Austin Cook Merrill 
Boyd Milford Smith 
Justin Henderson 
Eoy Earl Parrish 
Walter Warren Point, Jr. 
Charles William Louchery 



Univeisitate. 

Roger Farl Watson 

Corwin Brrns 

Ralph Tliomas Thayer 

S. L. Floiirnoy 

L. L. McClure 

Lonnie Watterson Ryan 

Jacl son Van Vrren Blai 

Edward Henry Beardsey 

Clark Francis Poole 

John McGill 

Marion Campe Gilchrist 



158 






159 



iFoiiiitlert at Columbia University, 181 

COLORS 

Scarlet and Gray 

FLOWER 

Red Carnation 



160 



OTesit Virginia 3Ci Cfjapter. 



■itabiished Xoveiiiber KM 
Fratic 



IJMIS 



John Lewis Shelton 
Justin Franlv Grant 



1«»10 

Samuel John IMorris 



Asa Williams Adkins 
Cecil Omar Post 



Walter Steenrod Bai 

Eustus Golf 

T. E. Vass 

R. J. Stackliammer 

R. M. Bobbltt 

H. F. Coffman 



Fatultate. 

Albert Moore Reese 

Frederick Lawrence Kortwright 



Fi'atri's ill Universitate. 



Arthur Ecquilla Brindley 

1912 

Harry Leslie Stilphen 

1913 

Clarence Jam.es Prlckett 
J. G. ColES 
Thomas Best 
J. G. Brennan 
J. A. Sanders 



ACTIVE CHAPTERS 

Columbia University jllinois University 

Cniversity of :\laryland University of Tennessee 

^Maryland ^Medical College Tulane University 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy Atlanta College of Physicians and 

University of Alabama Surgeons 

Birmingham Medical College Baltimore College of Physicians and 

Vanderbilt I'niversity Surgeons 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy University of Alabama 

Medical College of South Carolina Louisville College of Pharmacy 

West Virginia University Northwestern Universitv 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City. 



ALUMM CHAPTERS 

Baltimore, :\Id. 
Birmingham. Ala. 



161 



Foiuuled Marcli Kith, 1910. 

Oflicers 

GLENN HUNTER Senior Archon 

JAY EDGAR BILLINGSLEY Junior Archon 

JAMES ROY ECKMAN Grammateus 

JOSEPH KRAUSE GRUBB Thesaurites 

Arclions 

James Roy Eclcinan Phi Kappa Psi 

Trevey Nutter Phi Sigma Kappa 

Glenn Hunter ^. Phi Kappa Sigma 

Claris Culhertson Burritt'! Beta Theta Pi 

Josepli Krause Grubb Delta Tau Delta 

Charl-es William Louchery Sigma Chi 

Roy Olney Hall Kappa Alpha 

Robert Moss French Sigma Nu 

Jay Edgar Billingsley Sigma Phi Epsilon 



162 



A^Q^ 



163 




i 



(I 



1G4 




165 



01 Womtn'i Jfraternitiesf. 

Ovganizetl April 2ii(l, 1906. 

Oflicei-f. 

President, Mary Meek Atkeson, Alpha Xi Delta. 
Secretary, Clara Elizabeth Dickason, Chi Omega. 
Treasurer, Margorie Bonner Patterson, Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Offiicial Delegates. 

Alpha Xi Delta. Chi Oiiieoa. 

Lillian Ballard Smith Mrs. Georgia Craig Truscott 

Leda Cordelia Atkeson Helen Blanche Vance 

Leola May Smith Clara Elizabeth Dickason 

Kappa Kappa (laniiiia. 

Margaret Buchanan 
Dorcas Mahala Pritchard 
Majorie Bonner Patterson 



m 



166 



^Ipta Xi Belta. 



Founded at Lombard Collesie, Galesbiuji, Illinois, April 17. 1S9;J, 

COLORS 

Light Blue, Dark Blue and Gold 

FLOWER 

Pink Rose 



167 



3ota Cijaptet* 

Established May 8tli, 1905. 
ratront'sses. 

Mrs. Charles Edgar Hce-^ Mrs. Thomas Clark Atkeson. 

Mrs. William Jackson Leonard 

Sorores in Urbe. 

Mrs. Carl Harrison Smith !\Tary Frances Chadwick 

Mabel .Jane Weaver Lillian Ballard Smith 

Sorores in Universitate. 
1910. 

Ethel Averil Green, A. B. Ethel Crimni Peterson 

Mary Stewart Fravel Mary Meek Atkeson. 

1911. 

Leda Cordelia Atkeson 

1912. 

Leola May Smith Edith Scott Smith 

1913. 

Nellie Mae Herring Melle ?ilargaret ]McConnell. 



168 




169 



I^oU of Cftapterg. 



Lombard College 
Iowa Wesleyan T'niveraitv 
Mt. Union College 
Bethany College 
University of South Dakota 
Wittenberg College 
Syracuse University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of West Virginia 



University of Illinois 
Tufts College 
University uf Minnesota 
University of Washington 
Kentucky State Univprsity 
University of California 
Alliance Alumnae 
Mt. Pleasant Alumnae 
Boston Alumnae 



170 



Cf)i ©mega. 

Founded at liiiveisity <>t Aikansas, April 5th, 1895. 



COLORS 

Cardinal and Straw 



FLOWER 

White Carnatioi 



371 



i 



QDtjeta Chapter. 

Eslablished June 2ml, 1905. 

Soroi-es in Ui'be. 

Mrs. John Harrington Cox Mrs. Edward Mentzer 

Mrs. Frederick Wilson Trcscott Mrs. John Behny Grumbein 

Mrs. Charles Russell Huston Mrs. James Morton Callahan. 
Mrs. Waitman Barbe 

Sorores in Uiiiversititte. 
1910. 

Helen Blanche Vance 

1911. 

Lucy Clare Cliffcrd Helen Riggan Knowlton 

Emily Josephine Wihroth Clara Elizabeth Dickason 

1912. 

Esther Jean Gilmore Edith Ellwood Coombs 

Rhea Watson Warden Mary Manning Holroyd 

1913. 

Edith Gretchen Warrick 



e 



172 




173 



i^oll of ^ctibe Ctaptersi. 



TTniversity of Arkansas 
Transylvania University 
Union University 
University of Mississippi 
Randolph-Macon Woman's Colic 
Tulane University 
University of Tennessee 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of California 
University of Kansas 



University of Nebraska 
University of Texas 
West Virginia University 
University of Michigan 
University of Colorado 
Columbia University 
Dickinson College 
Florida Woman's College 
Colby Coll-?ge 
University of Washingtcn 
Universitv of Oregon 
George Washington University 



Alumni Cfjaptersf. 



Payetteville 
Washington City 
Atlanta 
Lexington 
Oxford 
Knoxville 
Chicago 
Kansas City 



New Yo 

Texarlsana 

New OrUans 

Lynchburg 

Denver 

Milwaukee 

Des Moines 



City 



17 t 



Sappa Sappa #amma, 

Fouiultxl 1«7() 

COLOKS 

Light Blue and Dark Blue 

FLOWER 

Fleur-de-lis 



175 



\ 



Peta Mpsiilon Chapter. 

Established December 23, 1906 

Sorores in Urbe 

Mrs. Ethel Finnieum Moreland (Xi) 

Mrs. Leanna Donley Brown (Gamma Rho) 

Flora Fay Hayes 

Lucy Wilson 

Mrs. Adelaide Dovey Church (Psi) 

Mrs. Anne Jones Fowler 

Evelyn Sage Burns 

Sorores in Facilitate 

Margaret Buchanan 

Sorores in Universitate 
1910 

Nelle Steele Mahala Dorcas Prichard 

Ethel Ice Clara Belle Lytle 



a 



191] 



Nellie Dauphinee Slathers 
Agnes Cady 
Pauline Theakston 



Marjorie Bonner Patterson 
Pearl Reiner 
Genevieve Stealey 



Susan Louise Smith 



1913 

Lyda Jane Six 
Edna Arnold 

1913 

Louise Stealey 



(? 



176 




177 



laoU of ^ctibe Ctjapterg. 



Boston University 
Barnard College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell College 
Syracuse University 
University of Illinois 
Swarthmore College 
Allegheny College 
Buchtel College 
Wooster University 
Ohio State University 
University of Michigan 
Adrian College 
Hillsdale College 
Tulane University 
University of California 
University of Washington 
West Virginia University 



Indiana State University 
De Pauw University 
Butler College 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Pennsylvania 
Northwestern University 
Illinois Wesleyan 
University of Minnesota 
Iowa State University 
Missouri State University 
Nel)rasl:a State University 
Kansas State University 
Colorado State University 
Texas State University 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Montana 
Kentucky University 



178 




Ci)e ^nibersiitp Cijoral ^ocietp. 

(Louis Black, Director) 

PROGRAM FOR THE FOURTH CONCERT OF THE SEASON OF 1909- 
1910, MAY 3, 1810 

SOLOIST 

Mr. John R. Roberts, Baritone 

Old English Part — Songs: 

Ravenscroft (1613) In the Merry Spring 

Croce (1560) Cynthia Thy Song 

De Pearsall (17 59) Caput apri defero 

The Society 

Tschailvowski Pilgrims Song 

Wallace Nest Thee My Bird 

Damrosch Danny Deever 

Mr. Roberts 
Modern English: 

Elgar My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land 

Mendelssohn Fai'ewell to the Forest 

Gerricke Chorus of Homage 

The Society 

INTERMISSION 

Russian : 

Tschaikowski Light Celestial 

Cui Spring Delight 

Tschaikowski Cherubim Song No. 3 

The Society 
Mendelssohn It is Enough 

Mr. Roberts 

Ladies Chorus : 

Elgar The Snow 

Violins assisting 

Miss Margaret Home 
Mr. Howard Holt 

Raymond I Wonder Why 

Raymond Spring 

Homer Prospice 

Mr. Roberts 
Sacred: 

Zingarelli Go Not Far from Me 

Mozart Ave Varum 

Brahms Mary Magdalene 

Beethoven Hallelujah Chorus 

The Society 

(Mrs. Louis Black, Accompanist) 
180 



I 




^ T. ti. 'Jl 33 

S 



iUcmtJErs;, 



)Ocietp. 



Miss 

Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 



Sopranos 

Edna Babb 
Lulu Babb 
Cassandra Burnett 
Cliarlotte Blair 
Lucy Beltzlioover 
Anna Burk 
Catherin Beaumont 
.Jeanette Clark 
Pearl Compton 
Jessie Fitch 
M. E. Gorman 
Lillian Garrison 
Jessie Glover 
Elizabeth Gebhard 
Mary Holroyd 
Mary Hogg- 
Pearl Hodges 
Louise Haggins 
Elsie Jones 
Goldie Jones 
Marie Krak 
Rosa Ledley 
Ruth Maxwell 
Irene Madera 
Mary Mestrezat 
Ella Mattingly 
Susan Maxwell Moore 
R. H. Martin 
Adele Nicholls 
Elizabeth Quinn 
Maude Six 
Frances Stockton 



Miss Mattie Stewart 


Mr. 


Frank Morgan 


Miss Iva V. Schock 


Mr. 


John McGill 


Miss Regina Smith 


Pro 


f. A. W. Nolan 


Miss Nellie Weltner 


Mr. 


George Parker 


Miss Rhea Warden 


Mr. 


David Roberts 


Mi'ss Mary Williams 


Pro 


f. C. W. Waggoner 




IN'Ir. 


Plumer Weaver 


Altos 




Basses 


Miss E. Biersach 






Miss Mabel Constance Foster 


Mr. 


. Charles Baker 


Miss Gertrude Hays 


Mr. 


John Courtney 


Miss Audra Hercd 


Mr. 


John L. Core 


Miss Margaret Home 


Mr. 


Addison Clarke 


Miss May La Rue 


Mr. 


Phillip Davie s 


Miss Edna Leyman 


Mr. 


Earl Davis 


Miss Blanche Lazzelle 


Pro 


f. Tom Foulk 


INlrs. James Mcreland 


Mr. 


Wirt G. Faust 


Miss Pearl Eeiner 


Mr. 


Robert French 


Mrs. Grace Martin Snee 


:\ir. 


Howard Holl 


Miss Florence Smith 


:\ir. 


David T. Jones 


Mrs. Frank Trotter 


Mr. 


Harry King 


Miss Helen Vance 


Mr. 


J. B. Krak 


Tenors 


Mr. 


Samuel Morris 


Mr. 


James Moreland 


Mr. H. C. Brake 


]Mr. 


Charles Pyan 


Mr. Raymond Creel 


iMr. 


M. J. Sisler 


Mr. Eugene Evans 


Mr. 


C. H. Smith 


Mr. David H. Evans 


Mr. 


Boyd Smith 


Mr. Robert W. Evans 


Mr. 


B. W. Schenerlein 


Mr. Richard Gould 


Mr. 


A. B. Williams 


Mr. John M. Gregg 


Mr. 


Ellis Yost 


Mr. Edward Horstman 


Mr. 


Carl Yount 



a 



Mr. V. V. Law 



182 



Wit^t \Tirginia ZKnibersiitp jllinsitrelsi. 

Swisher Theatre, Fehriiary (wenfy-thinl. li>l(» 

Director Charles E. Stout 

Music lohnny Jones and Orchestra 

Manager '. . B. K. Littlepage 

CAST 

Interlocutor W. G. Marqua 

Ends King, Watkins, Core, Littlepage 

Soloists Maupin, McGill, Yount, Kinsey 

Chorus — Ryan, Smith, Horstman, Parker, Vance,' Yount, Carden, Gould, 
Armstrong. Martin, Hodges, Courtney and Adams 

SOXG PROGRAM 

Garden of Roses Maupin 

Wild Cherry Rag King 

Helen McGill 

Liza Core 

Any Old Port In a Storm Yount 

Black Salome Watkins 

Ballad Kinsey 

You'll Come Back Littlepage 

OLEO 

Monologue .' Littlepage 

Quartet Watkins. McGill. Yount, King 

Violin Solo Holt 

Acrobats :\Iartin and Armstrong 



163 




/' 



OClllTIEgf/LLUB) 



185 




Charles Henry Patterson, A. M. 
Jerome Hall Raymond, Ph. D. 
Josephine Raymond, A. M. 
Powell Benton Reynolds, D. D. 
Waitman Barbe, A. M., Litt. D. 
William Jackson Leonard 
Daniel Boardman Purinton, Ph. 



Klec'ted Honorary Members 



L. L. D. 



John Harrington Cox, A. M. 

Mrs. Pauline Wiggin Leonard, A. M. 

Frederick Wilson Truscott, Ph. D. 

Robert Allen Armstrong, A. M., L. H. D. 

James Morton Callahan, Ph. D. 

C. Edmund Neil, A. M. 

Henry Sherwood Green, A. B., LL. D. 



James Eussell Trotter, L. L. B., Ph. D. 



Simeon Conant Smith, A. M. 
Lloyd Lowndes Friend, A. B. 



Mrs. Bertha Browning Purinton, A. 
Mrs. Georgia Craig Truscott, A. B. 
Fred Colborn Flenniken, LL. B. 



hniini in Faculty 

David Dale Johnson, A. M. 
Margaret Buchanan, A. B. 

Alumni in City 

Rebecca Luella Pollock, A. B. 
Lillian Ballard Smith, A. B. 
Mrs. Maud Fulcher Callahan, A. 



i 



Alvmiiii in University 



Ethel Averil Green, A. B. 



Leo Carlin, A. B. 



Mary Meek Atkeson, (Head) 
Clara Belle Lytle, (Clerk) 
Helen Blanche Vance, (Watch) 
Edward Sidney Bock 
Wilbur Earl Gather 
John Cristler Evans 
Horace Laban White 
Susan Maxwell Moore, A. B. 



Active Members 

John Arndt Yount, A. B. 

Josephine Margaret Kunkle, 

Mrs. Ethel Crim Peterson 

Ethel Ice 

Anna Grace Cox 

Marjorie Bonner Patterson 

Olive Liland Hodges 



c 



^to peotoulf=(gebrpf)t 

Oigaiiized Febiuao 29tli, !!)()« 

MOTTO: 

Gaeth A Wyrd Swa Hio Seel 

PURPOSE: 

(a) A Knowledge of the Epics and Minor Tales of all Lands. 

(b) Practice and Skill in Oral Story-Telling. 
((•) Social Intercourse. 

MEETING PLACE 

Hrothgares Heal — Reced 

COLORS 

Fealwe — Orange and Lemon 

FLOWER 

The Daisy 

OFFICERS 

Se Foran-Sittend ETHEL ICE 

Se For-Sittend EVELYN SAGE BURXS 

Se Boc-Weard CLARA BELLE LYTLE 

Se Hord-Weard lOHX HARRINGTON COX 

Se Micel Scop HELEN BLANCHE VANCE 

Se Lytel Scop EVELYN SAGE BURNS 

Seo Cwen Waes-Hael-Folces MRS. JOHN HARRINGTON COX 

MEMBERSHIP IN THE CITY. 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG MARY MEEK ATKESON 
EVELYN SAGE BURNS ELMA PEARL COMPTON 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX ETHEL ICE 

FREDERICK ROST KOELZ CLARA BELLE LYTLE 

THOMAS ROACH McM'INN ETHEL CRIM PETERSON 

MALVIN H. REINHBIMER HELEN BLANCHE VANCE 

GLADYS MARY WATERS HELEN :\IERWIN WIESTLING 

EMILY JOSEPHINE WILMOTH 



187 



®tie mountain. 

Poxiiicled June Srd, 1904. 

THE MOUNTAINEERS. 

ROY OLNEY HALL GLENN HUNTER 

CARL COSSMAN YOUNT JOHN LAWSETTE MOLLISON 

BERNARD LEE HUTCHISON FREDERICK ROST KOELZ 

DAVID HARMAN KAHN HARRY ANTHONY EATON 

WALTER WARREN POINT, Jr. LONNIE WATTERSON RYAN 

LEO CARLIN 

THE MARSH 

JAMES ROY ECKMAN GEORGE WILLIAM ALLISON 

JOHN CRISTLER EVANS JAMES HARRISON RIDDLE 

HARRY RUFFNER WILEY EDWARD FRED HORSTMAN 

THE MODERATES. 

DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY 
CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON CHARLES EDGAR HOGG 
SIMEON CONANT SMITH RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS 

THOMAS EDWAED HODGES JUSTIN FRANK GRANT 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN JOHN BEHNY GRUMBEIN 



188 



Honorary Meiiibeis 

Charles Edgar Hogg- 
Clement Ross Jones 
Frank Roy Yoke 

1910 

John Lawsettee Mollison Charles William Louchery 

Marcus Orran Bond Leo Carlin 

James Roy Bckman Austin Cook Merrill 

Phinney Porter Thomas Reiner Justin Henderson 

Irving Hayne Moran George William Allison 

Arthur Melville Jacobs Halleck McGinp'<= Rrott 

Burrell Kemp Littlepage Walter Warren Point, Jr. 

John Thoburn Morgan Bantz .Wooddell Craddock 



190 




191 



^fje ®nitiergitp ©ramatic Club. 



%&e^ 



The college year of 1909-1910 has been marked by 1 Ednuind Neil, the Director of the Club. That this test 

many changes, but no greater step in advancement and I is worthy the name is e\-idenced bv the fact that of the 

influence has been made than that of the organization of ! forty students who first expresed a desire to l)elong only 

the AV. V. U. Dramatic Club. ■ eighteen passed the recpiirements. 

All universities of size and ;)reslige have dramatic The ])ur]iose of the Clul) is to study dramatic litera- 

clubs, and this university, e\er increasing its standard [ ture l)y i)r(>ducing ])lays, two of which will be ])ublic 

and fields of opportunity, saw the need of such an (jrgan- peri'i irmanccs during llie year. Mr. N-eil instructs the 

ization and promptly formed one. mcmlicrs in tlie techni(|ue of the drama, and in the philo- 

This club is based upon a firm foundation, and ^""P^'y "^ ■^'-'^"^ and character building. Already it is 

neither political pulls nor social infiuence give one entree. considered one of the highest honors in the university 



The membership is composed of the successful candi- 
dates who have pased the dramatic test required l)y C. 



to l)e a meml)er of tlie club. 



Oflficei's and Menihers 

C. EDMUND NEIL Director 

BOYD MILPORD SMITH President 

ARTHUR ACQUILLA BRINDLEY Vice-President 

EMILY .JOSEPHINE WILMOTH Secretary 

MIFFLIN MARSH WATKINS Treasurer 

Irene Marie Andris Fredericlc Rost Koelz 

Wilber Earl Gather Frank Lewellyn 

Charles Hodges William Laidley, .Tr. 

Pearl Hodges _ Alexander Miller 

Mary Holroyd ' Pearl Scott 

Albert Kern Nellie .Jeanetta Weltner 

Harry William King, .Jr. Gretchen Warrick 

Honoiaiy Menibeis 

SinT-cn Gonant Smith 
Grace Gardner Neil 

192 



I) 




p]stabiislie(l, Xoveiiilier 23, 1908 

COLORS 

Lalo, Bardroy, Butacole 

EMBLEM 

Cacabi 

CHUAJANI 

!!!?!!! 
-$$!$$- 

P , ' .' '. '.' /'^, 

X X X X . 

? ? ? ? . 
CALLI 

Seniors Sophomores 

Helen Blanche Vance Esther Jean Gilmore 

Clara Belle Lytle Virginia Baker 

Margaret Eleanor Mockler 

Freshmen 
Juniors Louise Stealey 

Helen Margaret DeBerry 

Emily Josephine Wilmoth Specials 

Genevieve Stealey Alice Engle 

Helen Merwin Weistling Elizabeth Gebhart 

Stella Rebecca Wilson 



i 



194 



I 




195 



m. m. ciufa 



Established Spring 1S)()« 

Officers 

Van '-PIDGB" POINT 

Vice Van "ANGIE" LOUCHERY 

Viaticum "KAISER" KOELZ 

Venerable Pedestrians 

"Kaiser" Koelz "Angie" Lcuchery 

"Brownie" Hodges "Yanli" Vance 

"Pidge" Point "Fuss-cat" Harris 

Villein Creepers 

"Hen" Hunter "Bobbie" Reiner 

"Second" Best "Ammy" Wilnioth 

"Bull" Yount "Woofle" Fry 

"Peggy" Scott "Merry" McKinney 



€ 



196 




197 




RICULTU-RE 




Sgricultural experiment Station ^taff* 

JAMES H. STEWART, A. X Director and Agriculturist 

BERT HOLMES HITE, M. S Vice Director and Chemist 

WELTON MARKS MUNSON, Ph. D Horticulturist 

WILLIAM EAPL KUMSEY, B. S. Agr Bacteriologist 

HOPACE ATWOOD, M. S. Agr Assistant Agriculturist 

PkEDEFICK EKNEST BROOKS Associate Entymologist 

FPANK BATSON KUNST, A. B Assistant Chemist 

CHARLES FDWAPD WEAKLEY, Jr Assistant Chemist 

ARTHUR LINCOLN DACY, B. So Assistant Hnri iculturist 

JAN HENDPICK BERGHUIS-KRAK Assistant Chemist 

OSCAR CHAPLES BECK, B. S Assistant Chemist 

WILLIAM J. WHITE Clerk 

MARTHA A. STEWART Librarian 

ALICE ENGLE . . ' Secretary 



I 



I 



198 



®nibersiitp (grange. 



Officers 

Master EARL WOODDELL SHEETS 

Overseer HU SWISHER VAXDERVORT 

Lecturer ARETAS WILBUR NOLAN 

Steward ERNEST BELL 

Assistant Steward .TAINIES EVANS DILLE 

Chaplain VERB PETEESON 

Treasurer THO^L\S CLARK ATKESON 

Secretary GEORGE COLUMBUS STARCHER 

Gate-Keeper VERNER VADIS LAW 

Ceres iMRS. JIYRTA NOLAN 

Pomona MARY MEEK ATKESON 

Flora ETHEL CRIM PETEFSON 

Lady Assistant Steward LEDA CORDELIA ATKESON 



199 



Jf airmont iSormal Clufa^ 

I 



PRANCES WILLARD STEELE President 

ROBERT SIDNEY REED Vice President 

ETHEL ICE Secretary 

MAHALA DORCAS PRICHARD Treasurer 

PRANK REEVES ■''eporter and Football Manager 

WALTER GASKINS Basketball Manager 



200 



r 



I 



Y. WL. C J^ 



OFFICP^RS OF Y. M. C. A. 

GLENN HUNTER President 

VERD PETERSON Vice President 

GEORGE Tn..MAN TWYFORD Secretary 

GEORGE BOWERS VIEWIG Treasurer 

CABINET 

VERD PETERSON Bible Study 

WIRT GERRY FAUST Devotional 

EDGAR BOYLE SPEBR Membership 

GEORGE BOWEnS VIEWIG Finance 

CHARLES GEORGE BAKER New Students 

FREDERICK ROST KOELZ Social 

ANDREW ALPHONSO TORRANCE Extension 

WALTER WARREN POINT, Jr Advertising 

BOYCE RAY FITZGERALD Lecture Course 

ADVISORY BOARD 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG Chairman 

OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD Treasurer 

Aretas Wilbur Nolan Howard Justus McGinnis 

Terence D. B. Stewart Glenn Hunter 

George Bowers Viewig Edward Hartman ^lunson 
Ellis Ashby Y'ost 



201 



1. m. C. ^. mark in West 
^ l^irginia Uniucrsitg ^ 



(^^'HE highest type of Christian manhood is the 
^(v'^~ meaning- and standard of the Young Men's Chris- 
^^""'^ tion Association. To permeate the h\-es nf all 
men in school with higher ideals and iKiMcr 
aspirations is the purpose of this organizatiun. 
Helpfulness expresses it hriefly Students need direction 
and motive for the highest life service, as much as they 
need technical and intellectual training. 

This year the work of the Association has expanded 
and progressed beyond the high expectations of its most 
earnest supporters. New interest has been taken in the 
work by those formerly indilTerent. Although the mem- 
bership has not advanced more than fifteen or twenty 
percent, yet the number of members actively aiding in 
developing a strong vigorous Association has been 
doubled and trebled. 

Lack of space prevents a detailed summary of activi- 
ties undertaken this year. Suffice it to say that the sum 
and substance of the Y. M. C. A. work in the University 
is that it unites in one body all Christian men of the 
school, affords them ample opportunity to do real Chris- 
tian service, and tends to elevate the moral tone of the 
lives of all students. 



I 



202 




203 



TJffung IHffntm'g Qlhrtsttan ^smtmimn, 

OFFICERS 
1909-10 

DORCAS MAHALA PRICHARD President 

GENEVIEVE STBALEY Vice President 

NELLIE GRANT HETNDERSON ~ Recording Secretary 

ETHEL GRIM PETERSON Corresponding Secretary 

HELEN MARGARET DE BERRY Treasurer 

OFFICERS 
1910-11 

HELEN MARGARET DE BERRY President 

EVA MYRTELLE FLING Vice President 

BESSIE 'reed Recording Secretary 

GLADYS MARY WATERS Corresponding Secretary 

JUNE CAREY HOUSTON Treasurer 



204 



# 




205 




PHI PSI COLLIE 



206 




207 



OFFICERS 

President HELEN MARGARET DE BERRY 

Vice President GENEVIEVE STEALEY 

Recording Secretary ETHEL CRIM PETERSON 

Ccrresponding Secretary MARGARET ELEANOR MOCKLER 

Treasurer LUCY CLARE CLIFFORD 

WOMAN'S LEAGUE BOARD 

June Carey Houston Lucy Clare Clifford 

Genevieve Stealey Helen Margaret De Berry 

Etbel Crini Peterson Ethel Ice 

Margaret Eleanor Mockler 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Faculty Members 

Mrs. Purinton Mrs. Stathers 

Mrs. Chez Mrs. Leonard 

Miss Moore 

ALUMNI 

Miss Moreland Miss Buchanan 



^ 



€ 




209 



Columbian Merarp ^onetp. 

Officers for the Fall Term, 1909 

WAYNE KENNEDY PRITT President 

GEOPGE COLUMBUS STARCHER Vice President 

ELIZABETH QUINN Eecording Secretary 

ESTER KEMPER Corresponding Secretary 

PEARL HODGES Treasurer 

WIRT GERRY FAUST Cliorister 

E. W. SPEAR Cii'ic 

OJIifers lor the Wintei- Term, 1910 

GEORGE COLUMBUS STARCHER President 

PEARL HODGES Vice President 

ESTA KEMPER Recording Secretary 

REBECCA CORE Treasurer 

WAYNE KENNEDY PEITT Marshall 

WIRT GERRY FAUST Cliorister 

Omcers f(ir the Spring Term, 1910 

LUTHEF SHERMAN BRITTON President 

ROBERT MOSS FRENCH Vice President 

NELLIE MAY HEREING Recording Secretary 

HYRE CLYDE B^AKE Corresponding Secretary 

JOHN ALEXANDER MacRAE Treasurer 

JOHN DONALD RYAN Critic 

ELIZABETH QUINN Chorister 

GEORGE COLUMBUS STARCHER Marshall 



210 




211 



J^arttjenon Hiterarp ^octetp. 

Offlceis t:)i- the Pal! Teiiu, 1909 

WILBUR EARL GATHER President 

CHARLES WILLIAM LOUCHERY Vice President 

SUSAN LOUISE SMITH Secretary 

ALEXANDER MILLER Attorney 

MAPJORIE BONNER PATTERSON Critic 

EVA MYKTELLE FLING Chorister 

HOP AGE LAB AN WHITE Marsliall 

Officers f<ir the Wiiitsr Teiiii, 1910 

JAMES GUY ALLENDER President 

SAMUEL HENRY SANGER Vice President 

PEARL SCOTT Secretary 

CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH Attorney 

GEORGE EDWARD RHODES Critic 

NELLIE GF ANT HENDERSON Clicrister 

WILBUR EARL GATHER Marshall 

CflUeis for the Spring Term, 1910 

HUBERT GARRETT GROGAN President 

CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH Vice President 

BESSIE REED Secretary 

JAMES CORNWALL ALLEN Attorney 

CLARA BELLE LYTLE Critic 

JAMES GUY ALLENDER Marshall 



m 



212 




213 



t 



Corps! of Cabets. 

CAPTAIN, HARRY ANTHONY EATON, 23rd U. S. Inf., Commandant 
ORDNANCE SERGEANT, HENRY ST. CLAIR U. S. A. Armorer 

FIELD AND STAFF 

CADET .lOHN CHRISLER EVANS Major 

.lOHN NATHAN SIMPSON Captain, Surgeon 

CADET CHARLES GEORGE BAKER 1st Lieutenant Adjutant 

CADET HARRY GROVE WHEAT 1st Lieutenant Quartermaster 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF 

CADET HARMAN HALLER KERR Sergeant Major 

CADET EUGENE LYON COLCORD Quartermaster Sergeant 

CADET HOWARD CHARLES RIGGS Ordnance Sergeant 

CADET ENOCH SMITH Chief Trumpeter 

BAND 

MR. WALTER A. MESTREZAT Cliief Musician 

CADET THOMAS CLYDE PITZER Principal Musician 

COjMPANY a. 

CADET GEORGE WALTER GROW Captain 

CADET NEAL MINTER HEFLIN 1st Lieut. 

CADET HOMER ARTHUR HOSKINS 2nd Lieut. 

CADET WILBUR EARL CATHEH ...'.'................. ist Sergeant 

COMPANY B 

CADET CLAUDE SPRAY TETRICK Captain 

CADET WALTER WARREN POINT,Jr. I'st Lieut. 

CADET JOHN LOWRIE ROBINSON ...■...■.■.'.■.■.■.■.■.■.'.'..'.'.■ 2nd Lieut. 
CADET FRANK VANDERSLICE SANDER 1st Sergeant 



i 



214 



tlfje ^ttenaeum. 



Published by tlie Students Publishing Association of West Virginia 
University 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

WILLIAM EARL GATHER, '10, Editor-in-chief (Winter & Spring Terms) 

JOHN CHRISLER EVANS, '10 Editor-in-chief (Pall Term) 

FRANCIS WILLARD STEELE, '11 Assistant Editor-in-chief 

GUY HERMAN BURNSIDB, '11 Athletic Editor 

LEDA GORDELIA ATKESON, '11 Organization Editor 

HELEN BLANGHE VANGE, '10 Personal Editor 

GENEVIEVE STEALEY, '11 Exchange Editor 

WIRT GERRY FAUST, '12 Local Editor 

VERD PETERSON, '10 Business Manager 



216 




217 



tCfje iHonongalian. 

A LITERARY MAGAZINE 

Published by tlie Stiicleiits of AVest Vii-ginia University 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

ETHEL CRIM PETERSON, '10 Editor-in-chief 

LEONARD JULIUS BERNSTEIN, '12 Assistant Editor-in-chief 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Clara Belle Lytle, '10 James Guy Allender, '10 

Marjorie Bonner Patterson, '11 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Earl Wooddell Sheets, '11 



218 




219 



Monttcola BoarCi 



ARTHUR BROWN HODGES 
Editor-in-Chief 



MARJORIE BONNER PATTERSON 

Assistant Editor 



CLAY DILLE AMOS 
Business Manager 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Committees 



Literary 

Robert Sidney Reed 
Leda Cordelia Atl^eson 
Helen Merwin Wiestling 
Howard Robert Bartlett 

Organizations 

Glenn Hunter 
Leda Cordelia Atkeson 
George Truman Twyford 
Charles George Baker 

Art 

Pearl Louise Reiner 
Herman Deidler Pocock 



Calendar 

Lucy Clare Clifford 
Glenn Hunter 
Bernard Lee Hutchinson 
Helen Margaret De Berry 

Fnn 

Helen Merwin Wiestling 
Pearl Louise Reiner 
Helen IMargaret De Berry 
Howard Robert Bartlett 

Athletics 

Bernard Lee Hutchinson 
Herman Deidler Pocock 



220 




221 



Stxidents' ^bltglTinq ^ssffcicittou. gj 



GLENN HUNTER President 

CLARA BELLE LYTLE Secretary 



222 




223 



^tfjletic poarb of Control. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN President 

DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS Secretary 

AEETAS WILBUR NOLAN Treasurer 

Anthony Wencel Chez Harry Anthony Eaten 

SrUDP^iXT MKMHEHS 
1910 

George Grant Crewson Jay Edward Billingsley 

1911 

Guy Herman Burnside James Harrison Riddle 

1912 

Roscoe Pariott Posten 



224 




225 



Vavs^itV jFootfaall %intup, 1909. 

Coach LUEDER 

Graduate Manager FOULK 

Student Manager LOUCHERY 

Cajtain HUTCHINSON 

TEAM 

Eight End Wiley 

E ight Tackle Bullard 

E ight Guard Cole 

Center Woodhouse 

Left Guard Swearingen 

Left Tackle Yount 

Left End Hutchinson 

Right Half Merrill 

Left Half Munk 

Full Back Springer 

Substitutes: Malone, Wilson, Hall, Amos, Feller, Floyd, Watkins, 
Sperling, Garden, McDonaLl. 

^coreg, ^cfjebule 1909. 

Oct. 2, W. V. 15 — Waynesburg 
Oct. 9, W. V. 0— U. of P. 12 
Oct. 16, W. V. 40 — Slippery Rock 5 
Oct. 23, W. V. 6 — Bucknell 6 
Oct. 30, W. V. 3 — Marietta 
Nov. 6, W. V. — U. of Pitt. 
Nov. 13, W. V. — Penn. State 40 
Nov. 17, W. V. 4 9— W'. V. W. C. 
Nov. 2 5, W. V. 0— W. & J. 18 



226 




d 




22!) 




^n. ^T. \\. us. "it. of Pcmt. 

In one of the hardest fought games of the sea- 
son A\'est A'irginia lost to Pennsylvania by the score 
of 12 to o. It was not until our team was worn out 
and in the last seven minutes of the second half that 
Pennsvlvania succeeded in scoring at all. 

Throughout the first half the ball see-sawed 
back and forth in the center of the field, neither team 
being al)le to gain an\' gr( mnd, and each being forced 
to punt frec|uently. When the whistle blew for the 
close of the first half the ball was on Penn's forty 
fi^-e yard line in West A'.irginia's possession. 

As this was the second game of the season for 
AA'est A'irginia the length of the halves began to tell 
on our men in the last half. The Quakers used 
many sul)stitutes throughout the game. After be- 
ing held for downs four times inside fourteen yard 
line, they finally managed to cross the goal line 
through a clever forward pass from Captain Aliller 
to Marks. 

The second touchdown for the Red and I'.lue 
came just a minute before the game closed. This 
was secured bv carrying the ball half way dnwn 
the field, IMiller making the score. The game ended. 
Score Penn. 12. W. A'. U. o. 




231 



MERRILL 




WILEY 




WOODHOUSE 




232 



COLE 









la 






i^ 


^^ . 







MONK 



'ikirlutcll us. *ill. v. 'iX. 

A (li>mal cold and incessant rain marred the 
dav of nur inrst 1)1,^- game at home. Aljout three 
o'clock the rain ceased, leaving the gridiron a sea 
of mud. Despite the threatening weather a large 
crowd turned out and were well repaid by a grand 
struggle between two almost evenly matched team^. 

Tlucknell kicked off to AN'est A'irginia. Each 
and everv man on the team played with his utmost 
spirit and vim. and finally carried the ball to Ihick- 
nelTs one yard line. There they lost the ball on 
downs. On the next play, howe\er. Cole broke 
through liucknell's line, blocked their kick and fell 
upon the ball for our only touchdo\\n. Munk kick- 
ed goal. 

West Mrginia again received the ball from the 
kick off and by consistent line jilunging and clever 
head work again carried the ball to lUicknell".^ 
twenty yard line. Here, however. Dame Fortune 
took a hand. By a great leap Bucknelbs speedy 
half, Clark, intercepted a forward pass and before 
either team fully realized what had happened wa> 
oft" on his spectular eighty yard run for a touch- 
down. O'Brien kicked goal. 

In the second half tlie two teams played each 
other to a standstill. Altho the game ended in a 
tie score and was not exactly to our liking, yet it 
was a great game, and our men deserved and re- 
ceived great credit. 



''V^-^V/^,. •■.'>. 


:>:;v,-!>-^it<'''A>^-'e-- 








w^ 







233 



SWEARENGEN 




GARDEN 




BULLARU 




234 



McDonald 




PEARCY 



TOpst lltrgtnta us. "^^ttt. 

^\"i^h odds oi two to one against her and out- 
weighed t\vent}--six pounds to the man. West \ ir- 
ginia met and i)layed their old rival Pitt, to a stand- 
still. 

'j'he superior training, skill and endurance of 
. lur light team, stood the test against the 1)attering 
attacks of the iieavy and superior Pitt team. 

Pitt kicked otT to our twenty yard line. Here 
]>racticallv began a great i)nnting duel, flunk's 
kicking always kept the ball out of the danger 
zone and Pitt after two or three attem])ts to i)ierce 
our line, would either lose the ball on downs or 
uould be forced to kick. After thirty minutes of 
gruelling play made constantly exciting by s])ec- 
tacular plays, tackles and l)ursts of speed, the half 
ended witii the ball in our jiossession on our fort_\ 
yard line. 

\A'ith renewed and increased spirit Captain 
Hutchinson lead his nervy team liack for tlie second 
half. Our men were outweighed, but were neither 
out-classed nor out-generaled, and Pitt could do 
nothing with them. Every method of attack failed 
to gain for Pitt the coveted touchdown. Even the 
putting on of almost an entirely fresh team availed 
them nothing and the game ended with the score 
o to o, which is considered practically a victory for 
the Old Gold and Blue. 




235 



SPSINGER 



■IfJ^^^l 




PootUaU \evw\— nrs-l Oov^^ 




Fo.TU\T,.,n-^^.v.Gvv 



236 




237 




238 



e^ 






BASE BALL 



mmM^mmm^m%mmmmm^mm^m^^m% 




239 



Jiasc PaU fecfjetiule 1909. 



April 16 — 

W. V. U. 
April 17 — 

W. V. U. 
April 23 — 

W. V. U. 
April 2 4 — 

W. V. U. 
May 7 — 

W. V. U. 
May 8 — 

W. V. U. 
May 11 — 

W. V. U. 
May 12 — 

W. V. U. 
May 14 — 

W. V. U. 
May 15 — 

W. V. U. 
May 19 — 

W. V. U. 
May 2 2 — 

W. V. U. 
May 2 6^ 

W. V. U. 
May 28— 

W. V. U. 
May 29 — 

W. V. U. 
May 2 9 — 

W. V. u. 
June 2 — 

W. V. F. 
June 3 — 

W. V. U. 
June 7 — 

W. V. U. 
June 8 — 

W. V. U. 
June 11 — 

W. V. U. 
June 16 — 

W. V. U. 



AT HOME 

6 Bethany College 4 

16 Bethany College 7 

1 Clarksburg, W. Vci. .... 5 

Clarksburg, W. Va. . . . 2 
4 W. & J 3 

13 W. & J 6. 

2 Cuban Stars 5 

22 W. V. W. C. 4 

4 Allegheny College 3 

9 Allegheny College 7 

1 Penn State College .... 12 

10 Univ. of Pitt 5 

13 Muskingum College ... 2 

8 Denison College 4 

10 Denison College 4 

13 Denison College 

6 Waynesburg College ... 4 

9 Waynesburg College... 2 

2 Pittsburg Collegians:' ... 1 

3 Pittsburg Collegians ... 4 

5 W. & J 1 

9 Alumni 10 



April 28 — 

W. V. U. 
April 29 — 

W. V. U. 
April 30 — 

W. V. U. 
May 1 — 

W. V. u. 
May 21— 

W. V. U. 
June 4 — 

W. & J. . 



ABROAD 

Univ. of Pennsylvania . 2 
Manhattan College .... Rain 

Princeton Rain 

7 Navy 3 

4 Univ. of Pittsburg .... 
4 W. V. U 2 



Page Jiall 1line=up 1909, 

Graduate Manager FOULK 

Student Manager SCOTT 

Captain NEBINGER 

TEAM 

First Base Kee 

Second Base Shelton 

Third Base Hutchinson 

Short Stop Nebinger 

Lett Field Vandale 

Center Field McMinn 

Right Field Wiley 

Catcher Merrill 

Pitchers Blake, Grigg 

Substitutes: Backman, Hinerman, Wilson, Point, Felker. 



240 



■%^ 



^^Jh, 



e>.. 




!5V\' 



^ 



241 



Jiase ?iaU ^tfjetiule 1910. 





AT HOME 


April 15 


& 16 — Bethany College 


April 2 2 


& 2 3— Wheeling- 


May 5— 


Marshall College Normal 


May 6 & 


7 — Westminster College 


May 11- 


—Allegheny College 


May 14- 


-Otterbein College 


May 19, 


20 & 21 — W. & J. 


May 27- 


-W. V. W. College 


May 28 . 


& 30 — Bucknell College 


June 7— 


-Hiram College 


June 10 


& 11— Ohio Northern 


June 15- 


—Alumni 



ABROAD — EASTERN TRIP 

April 2 7 — University of Penn. 

April 28 — Maryland Agri. College 

April 29 — Georgetown University 

April 30 — A. M. — St. John's College 

April 30 — P. M. — Navy 



ABROAD — WESTERN TRIP 

June 1 — Notre Dame College 
June 2 — University of Michigan 
June 3 — Otterbein College 
June 4 — Ohio Wesleyan 



242 




243 




244 




I. 



f 1 






i45 




The first gymnastic team was organized in igo6 by 
director Chez. The object was to give our boys an 
incenti\-e for advanced gymnastics, and to do extension 
work in the near l)y towns. The team has given dem- 
onstrations of all-around gymnasium work including 
parallel bars, rings, horse, horizontal bar, buck, tumbling, 
calisthenics, boxing, wrestling, and games at the Fair- 
mont fligh School, the Kingwood High School, twice at 
the Manning-ton High School, and twice at the Fairmont 
Normal School. Besides these a trip was scheduled to 
Sistersxille, Xew Afartinsville, Middlebourne, and Wheel- 
ing. Wherever the team has given exhibitions consider- 
able interest in physical training has been aroused. 

MT]IMBE1{S OP THE TEAM FOR 1909-10 

HERMAN D. POCOCK Captain 



George W. Crow 
George E. Taylor 
Charles M. Lough 



Prank V. Sander 
Cullen G. Martin 
Johnson L. Graysoni 



246 




247 



aHandidates for ®ratk ®^am. 

Manager RICHARD J. GOULD 

Captain LEE H. MORRIS 

Allen B. Lambdin Charles Baker ^ 

Charlie C. Ryan Richard R. Feller ' ^ 

R. L. Buchanan Howard McGinnis 

Prank Reeves J. R. Eckman 

H. A. L. Walkup Edgar P. McCombs 

Carl Yoiint Ernest D. Conaway 
Arthur L. Fry 



248 






249 



^tuiientg Stoartet JfootbaU M. U. 1909 



Rudolph Munk 

A. H. Bullard 
Lee Cole 
Carl Yount 

B. Lee Hutchinson 
A. C. Merrill 

Chas. Loughery, Manage) 



L. S. Bachman 
A. K. Shelton 



A. C. Merrill 
L. L. Wilson 
Mr. Grigg 
Mr. Blake 
J. N. Kee, Jr. 
L. F. Backman 
A. K. Shelton 



TKACK — 1909 



L. L. Wilson 

D. L. Garden 
C. W. Springer 
H. R. Wiley 

E. L. Swearingen 

Monogram 

W. H. Spencer 
W. H. Starbuck 



BASEBALL — 1909 



B. L. Hutchinson 
Fred Vandale 
Thomas R. McMinn 
H. B. Wiley 
W. W. Point, Jr. 
Mr. Hinerman 
Richard Nebinger 



250 






m^u 



'He MfVfV t-RoM HOAKE. 




WOMA/VS .VVAY 



251 




SEPTEMBER. 

Mon. re — Members (if the tacult}' laden with suit 
cases, boxes, bundles and ^reen l)a!;s. hurriedly assemble 
at L'nixersity after the summer vacation. 

Tues. 21 — A few 'og liack for "rusfiiny season." 
Daisy t'richard meets trains and mistakes a "domestic" 
for a new student and chases her into the alley door of 
a restaurant. 

Wed 22 — \V\ii \acuum around Science Hall, caused 
by absence of Professor Hodges. 

Thurs. .?3 — Classes assemble for assignments. 
"Rushers" throng the campus. 



alendar 



i^'ri. 24 — 'IMie \a\\\ .Scln h .1 applaud-- a dissertation by 
1). Randolph llias of Mingo County. He instructs the 
Dean upon a nice ])oint of law. 

Sat. 25 — Freshmen write to mamma. gi\ing thrilling- 
account of first impressions. 

Sun. 26 — Ever_vbody hu>\ handing in church letters. 

Mon. 2~ — Prof. P.lack tells Choral Society to "yell 
like well, simply screech." Thev do. 

Tues. 2't^ — Mr. Graves calls on "^liss Ringer" to 
translate, then blushes a beautiful rose ])ink at her un- 
responsiveness. 

Wed. 21; — Students visit Fair Grounds to see Gertie 
Ma_\-, she of the sylph like "figger" at 419 lbs. 

Thurs. 30 — Two co-eds bet on the races. One wins 
all-ee time-ee. Other lo>es. lias to walk home. 

OCTOBER. 

Fri. I — Reggie and a few friends give dance at 
Philips Hall. 



^53 



Sat. 2 — Foot-ball game with AVanesburg. Y. M. C. 
A. keg party in the gym. 

Sun. 3 — Good resolutions broken. Everybody 
starts to study. 

Mon. 4 — Dance committee and Philips scrapping. 

Tues. 5 — Large crowd at Chapel, as usual. Jack 
liare still holding down his old seat. 

Wed 6 — Wednesday night girls awfully lonesome. 
Old cases graduated. No new ones formed. 

Thur. 7 — Miss C — receives telegram. Oh, no it 
wasn't bad news from home. 

Fri. 8 — Dance at Pangle's. 

Sat. 9 — Penn 12 — AA'. V. U. o. 

Sun. 10 — llrite and fare. 

Mon. II — Sophs paint word "Hennery" on Woman's 
Hall once more. Joke so old nobody mentions it. 

Tues. 12 — After taking the oath of allegiance and 
signing their names seven times, the members of the 
faculty draw their first month's salary. 

Wed 13— Mr. Cram leaves town. Takes french 
leave or rather, leaves French. 

Thur. 14 — Swing disappears from Woman's Hall 
porch. Light put up once more. 

Fri. 15 — Mr. Hunter visits Pittsburg via Connells- 
ville. 

Sat. 16 — Slippery Rock Normal 5 — W. V. U. 40. 
Freshies get gay. Big scrap on athletic field. 

Sun. 17 — Duncan and Cox appear at Sunday School 
with black eyes and broken noses. 

Mon. 18 — Sophs post bills. Language shocks every- 
body on campus but the Freshies — they can't read. 

Tues. 19 — Nights frosty. Moving pictures become 
popular with strollers and loafers. 



AA'ed. 20 — First Monticola Board meeting. A date 
of great moment in college history. ' 

Thur. 21 — -"Bobby" Blake in town. Calls on the 
only girl his size in town. 

Fri. 22 — President's reception. ]>ig crush. 

Sat. 23 — Bucknell 6 — AA\ A\ U. 6. Crowd enjoys 
new l)leachers. Teams enjoy fine swimming. 

Sun. 24 — AA'oodhouse lost in South Park. Fails to 
turn up after Bucknell game. 

]\Ion. 25 — Dr. Deahl dismisses his 11:30 class on 
time ! ! mirable dictu ! 

Tues. 26 — Faculty take-ofl^ by AA'oman's League. 
Girls have great fun. 

AA'ed. 2^ — Profs, all sore. A day of reckoning!! 

J'hur. 28— English Club. Sadie's Parlour 11:30 P. 
M. 

Fri. 29 — Continuation of English Club 12:30 A. M. 
Room II, third floor, AA^iman's Hall. 7 .\. M. nine girls 
late to breakfast. 

Sat. 30 — Marietta o — AA\ V. IJ. 3. Carl Yount lost 
in Parkersburg. Many loyal alumni at game. 

Sun. 31— Clyde Scott's baby visits the PTall. Monti- 
cola calendar narrowly escapes being eaten up. 

NOVEMBER. 

Mon. I — Dean Hogg arranges law library. Roy 
Hall stands on his head in order to turn on lights. 

Tues. 2 — Dr. Truscott forgets his handerchief. 

AA'ed. 3— Dr. Deahl to H." L. AVhite : "Now we'll 
hear from you Mr. P>lack. 

Thur. 4 — Miss Moore fires our honorable Editor-in- 
chief from in front of AA^iman's Hall for smoking a 
Philips Special Stogie. 



254 



Fri. 5 — Team has l)ad i)ractice. Ted shows off his 
fine vocabular}-. 

Sat. 6— U. of P. o— AA'. \'. U. o. Armory Dance. 
Teams go to see "Jkey and Aljey." 

Sun. 7 — Xo dinner ordered for training table. Com- 
missar)- absent-minded, but he was "so busy." 

■ Mon. 8 — Sammy lirown : Are the marks on a 
goose's bill real teeth? 

Bright Student: Xo. they're false. 

Tues. 9 — r.rownie Ijreaks u]) the furniture in the 
Geology room. 

A\'ed. 10 — Speer takes a nap in HistorvClass. 

Thur. IT — Prof. Armstrong gets oil joke in class — 
annual alTair. 

Fri. 12 — Aliss Moore warns girls of the hvpnotist 
and the .\rcade as wicked places of allurement. 

Sat. 13 — Penn State 38 — A\'. \'. U. o. A pink tea 
party with State as hosts. 

Sun. 14 — "I'rex" Merrill goes to church. CambM-ia 
Glee Club in town. 

Abjn. 15 — Prof. Prown: To what class oi verter- 
brates does man belong? 

Class : Snakes. 

Tnes. 16 — ]\Ionk answers a question in the law 
school ! ! 

A\'ed. 17 — Puckhannon o — "\\". A*. U. 49. First snow 
of the year. Game something of a frost. Large num- 
1)er of loyal "rooters" for Puckhannon. 

Thur. 18 — "Flip" W'atkin's ankle gets well suddenly. 

Fri. 19 — T. X*. E. initiation. Pe these curious crea- 
tures escaped lunatics? X'o. the T. X". E. treasury is 
being replenished. 

Sat. 20 — Pand Concert. 



Sun. 21 — Students write louchng letters home. 

-Mon. 22 — Geology students gamble on the green. 
(den liunter ( Pres. of A'. M. C. .\.) lost fifteen cents. 

Tues. 2T, — "lirownie" gi\es the Monticola Poard a 
masterl}- "cussing out." "S'ou ought to hear what he 
said to us- 

Wed. 24 — K. K. G. Rece])tion. X'isitors commence 
to arriye. 

Thur. 25— A\'. & J. TO— W". \". U. 5. "Xough said. 
"Another year is coming." Sad crowd. I'>eta Dance. 
Armory Dance. 

Fri. 26 — T. X. E. Dance. Might as well dance as 
weeu. 

Sat. 27 — A'isitors depart. Festiyities oyer. 

Sun. 2S — Eyer)-I'ody tries to make u]) slee]j. 

Mon. 29 — T'>lue Ab)nda}- with a vengeance. Students 
settle down to "grind" for exams. Five men climb the 
Mountain. They "scaled" it before the Choral Society. 

Tues. 30 — AA'oodburn TIall students late to classes. 
Loop the loo]) around the building to liack door. 

DECEMBER. 

Wed. I — P'rofs. try to scare Freshies about exams. 
Miss Moore inter\iews the young ladies who ha\e been 
doing societ}'. 

Thur. 2 — ]\Iiss Fay acts as mail carrier for i)resuming 
student. 

Fri. 3 — Students Dance at Phili|>'s Hall. Duly four 
couples fell down. Was the floor slick or — ? ? 

Sat. 4 — Christmas Sale at Armory. Tea 1)ooth yery 
1 opular, also the Senior Tree. Everybody broke. 

Sun. 5 — "Tack" Sperling. AA'oodhouse. McDonald 
antl "Kid" I'earcy leave for the west to seek their for- 
tunes. 



255 



Mon.6 — Choral Concert. 

Tiies. 7 — Last Chapel service. All students turn 
out and walk over with their professors. 

Wed. 8 — Second trial for Dramatic Club. Simeon 
enthusiastic as usual. 

Thur. 9 — Everybody working hard. Calendar Com- 
mittee cramming too. 

Fri. 10 — First 'ice of the season. Students stop 
cramming and go for a skate. 

Sat. II — Pan-Hellenic Dance Boyd Smith and 
Harr}^ King in "Fairyland." 

Sun. 12 — Too busy to go to church. 

Mon. 13 — Proxy's office popular. Students try to 
excuse all absences. 

Tues. 14 — Last day of recitations. Alas! the day 
of reckoning is almost here. 

Wed. 15 — Lewis Core, Joe Grubb, Rodney Stemple, 
Charley Louchery and Lee Hutchinson stay up all night 
to study Geology. (R. S. & L. C. won, score 500 to 200). 

Thur. 16 — Prof. Brown discovers that Charley 
I^ouchery copied the geological survey of Harrison 
County. 

Fri. 17 — Smallpox scare. Morgantown threatened 
to be quarantined. Students rush out of town. 

WINTER TERM. 

JANUARY. 

Tues. 4 — New students compliment the many fine 
views about the campus in its present condition. 

Wed 5 — Old students down-hearted. Santa Claus 
didn't bring us a new boardwalk around the end of 
Woodburn Hall. AVhat have we done? 



Thur. 6— Teddy Bock is back. Girls dee-lighted. 

Fri. 7 — It is a long while until examinations so we 
can all loaf a little. 

Sat. 8— Y. AV. C. A.— Y. M. C. A. Reception. Pid- 
gie "shines in the "Reveries of a Bachelor." Great 
beauty show. 

Sun. 9 — Emily goes to church, first time this year — 
gets religion and goes to the Sabraton Mission, plays the 
organ and acts as first assistant. AA> are so proud of 
Emily. 

Mon. 10 — Farewell to the rats! Turban caps arrive 
by the carload and all the girls appear with stylish 
coifl^ures. 

Tues. II — Dr. Deahl forgets to meet his 11:30 class. 
Will wonders never cease! 

AA'ed. 12 — Slippery weather. We skate to school 
and slide back. 

Thur. 13 — * K "-I' gives a sledding party to Cheat. 
Brownie cuts his hand on a corkscrew. Now, how did 
that ever happen? 

Fri. 14 — Mass meeting in Commencement Hall to 
hear report from Rochester Con\'ention. 

Sat. 15 — Matinee dance. We didn't want the hall 
Friday night anyway. Let the youngsters have it. 

vSun. 16 — "Bob" is dead. The student body sympa- 
thizes with Professor Willey and the Law Class in their 
loss. 

Mon. 17 — The chairman of the Committee on Classi- 
fication and Grades, ably assisted by the President of 
the Y. M. C. A., the Captain of the football team and 
a few of the near-great, build a boardwalk around Wood- 
burn Hall. 



256 



Tues. i8 — The lull before the storm. All quiet in 
college circles. 

Wed. 19 — Junior Class Meeting. Under currents 
run agroinid. 

Thnr. 20 — IMizzard stopped Lyman Howe's progress 
to the Xorth Pole. 

Fri. 21 — Lee Hutchinson makes his weekh' trip to 
Fairmont. Lee has become a philanthropist and is try- 
ing to promote the happiness of the Race. 

Sat. 22 — Capt. Eaton gives Armory dance to Fhi 
Psi's — nine couples present. 

Sun. 23 — Everybody attends church that the}" mav 
conscientioush' be frivolous the next week. 

Mon. 24 — Rival ^Military I'.all announced to be given 
at Woman's Hall. Thereafter men have great difficulty 
in securing partners. 

Tues. 25 — AL)nticola Hoard meeting. The editor 
tells us how worthless and generalh* good for nothing 
we are. 

AA'ed. 26 — Kappa Psi Bancpiet. Dr. Simj^son nar- 
rowly escapes being carved up. 

Thur. 2/ — Glenn Hunter so excited about the ]\Iili- 
tary Kail that he ftirgot to attend the Turn-verein dance. 

Fri. 2S — Dance at Phillips Hall. Large crowd. 
Everybody practicing up ior the ^Military. 

Sat. 29 — Y. 'SI. C. A. Bible Supper. .Address by 
Clayton S. Cooper. 

Sun. 30 — IMiss Aloore spends the day "calling" the 
girls for making out dance programs. 

yion. 31 — Big Fight in Geology Class! ! Our noble 
editor-in-chief attempts to assist young- lady to remove 
coat. Mr. Grogg objects. They come to blows. For- 
tunately nobody injured. 



FEBRUARY. 

Tues. I— Among the out-of-town visitors for this 
week we are especially glad to welcome Mr. Lee Flutch- 
inson. 

AA'ed. 2 — Mo\'ing Da}- for - ^'^ Thev prepare for 
^ isitors. 

Thur. 3 — ?\Iatinee dance. - ^ and * ^ Theatre Par- 
ties. "The Time, the FMace. and the Girl" — for every- 
bod}. 

Fri. 4 — Afternoon — * ''^ ^' and -^ 'J" -^. Open Hou.se. 
Evening — The P-iggest Alilitarv Ball e\er 1 

Sat. 5 — 6:30 A. AL — Dance at - ^ House. 2:00 P. 
r\L — Student Dance. Exening — Everybody all in. 

Sun. 6— REMORSE. 

Mon. 7 — Profs all express hope that no one has let 
his studies interfere with his social duties ! 

Tues. 8 — Choral Society Concert. Miss Christine 
Miller. 

A\'ed. 9 — Aliss Wilmoth "Hunks" in Sociology. 

Thur. 10 — "Jonah Day" for Calendar Committee. 
A\"hat will the Editor say; 

Fri. 11 — Student Dance — a few left-o\er \isitors. 

Sat. 12 — Air. Ih'itton gives Air. Allender a black eye. 

Sun. 13 — Bad day. W. H. cases hold down the 
parlor. 

Mon. 14 — Cupid is the limit. Postman has no 
trouble in carrying his load. Too cold for even the 
English s])arro\vs to flirt. 

Tues. 15 — Dr. Deahl reads account of . A'alentine 
parties in the morning paper. Interviews the "social 
lights" in his classes. 

AA'ed. 16 — Air. Starcher refuses to accept some chest- 
nuts, stating that he has plenty in "Simeons" class. 



257 



Thur. 17 — 11:30 P. M. Everybody sleeping peace- 
fully in their little beds except Helen Wiestling who 
with a few friends was having a business meeting in 
her room. Oh no, it was no feast ! 

Fri. 18 — Committee goes to Moving Picture Shows 
to look for news — failed. 

Sat. 19— Y. M. C. A. Stag Party. BIG DOIN'S IN 
THE GYM. 

Sun. 20 — See February 13. 

Mon. 21 — Woman's League and Y. W. C. A. Re- 
ception. George Washington's Birthday Dance. 

Tues. 22 — Who made a noise like a cherry tree? 
AVas it Fred Koelz? Oh no, he isn't being initiated,, 
he's just going to a party. 

W^ed. 23 — A'linstrel Show. Who has the money? 
Give it to the faculty. 

Thur. 24 — Cadet Band Concert enjoyed by a large 
crowd. 

Fri. 25 — Education students have a much needed 
rest. 

Sat. 26 — Student Dance. 

Sun. 27 — "Dr. Buck" finds a number of letters left 
by Miss Vance in a h_ymnal in a fit of religious abstrac- 
tion, and, playing the role of Cupid, he sends the "Billy- 
doos" speeding on their way. AVhat would we do with- 
out Dr. Buck? 

Mon. 28 — Mr. Hunter returns from Charle.-ton. 
How did Connelsville get along without him? 

MARCH. 

Tues. I — Anthony Fiala lectured on the North Pole. 

AA'ed. 2 — Prexy calls the Law School down for 

smoking in classes. Mr. Flowrnev (after Prex takes 



his departure) — "\A'ho in was that called me down?" 

Thur. 3 — First try-out for base-b^ll. Spring's com- 
ing. 

Fri. 4 — y. Y's. initiate. All the initiates wear out 
shoe leather except Miss A\'ilmoth who rides the street 
car. 

Sat. 5 — Armory Dance, 7 couples. Phillips Hall 
Dance, 10 couples. Miss Moore addresses Pan-Hellenic. 

Mon. 14 — Student to Prof. Trotter — "Plow many 
sections will there be in Torts?" 

Prof. Trotter — "Two sections. I will teach one and 
Prof. Barnes the other." 

Student — "Then there will be one in 'Torts' and one 
in "Torture.' " 

Tues. 15 — Junior I'rom. Committee meets. Plans 
for the best Prom. e\'er. 

AA'ed. 16 — Dr. Deahl teaches Miss Wilmoth to use 
a pointer. 

Thur. 17 — Mr. Sccitt, when called on in E(|uity, 
endeavoring to read from an open book in the row 
ahead, is interrupted by J'rof. Willey. "Perhaps you 
could do better with a long distance spy glass." 

Fri. 18 — AA'hat is this awful noise!? Mr. Finney 
has arrived with five trunks full of ties and other ac- 
cessories. 

Sat. 19 — "Smiles" and "Dick" start "cheating" for 
this Spring. 

Sun. 20 — Everybody goes to church to pray for 
protection against the wrath to come. 

Mon. 21 — Jus Henderson lost in the AA'hite House. 
Never did find Room 132. 

Tues. 22 — A run on the drug stores. All the coca 
colas sold out. 



258 



Tues. 18 — 'I'he lull l)efore the storm. All quiet in 
college circles. 

Wed. ig — Junior Class Aleetinj;-. Under currents 
run aground. 

Thur. 20 — I'.lizzard stopi)ed Lyman Howe's progress 
to the North Pole. 

Fri. 21 — Lee Mutchinson makes his \veekl\- trip to 
Fairmont. Lee has l^ecome a philanthropist and is try- 
ing- to promote the happiness of the Race. 

Sat. 22 — Capt. Eaton gives Armory dance to I'hi 
Psi's — nine couples present. 

Sun. 23 — Everybody attends church that Xhex may 
conscientiously be frivolous the next week. 

Mon. 24 — Ri\al ^Military I'.all announced to be gi\"en 
at Woman's Hall. Thereafter men have great difficulty 
in securing ])artners. 

Tues. 25 — Alonticola Poard meeting. The editor 
tells us how worthless and generally good for nothing 
we are. 

A\'ed. 26 — Kappa Psi Banquet. Dr. Simpsoii nar- 
rowly escapes being carved up. 

Thur. 2"/ — Glenn Hunter so excited about the ]\lili- 
tarv ISall that he forgot to attend the Turn-verein dance. 

Fri. 28 — Dance at Phillips Fdall. Large crowd. 
Everybody i:)racticing u]) for the ^Military. 

Sat. 29 — Y. M. C. A. Pible Sup])er. Address bv 
Clayton S. Cooper. 

Sun. 30 — IMiss Moore spends the day "calling" the 
girls for making out dance programs. 

APjn. 31 — Rig Fight in Geology Class! ! Our noble 
editor-in-chief attempts to assist young- lady to remove 
coat. Mr. Grogg objects. They come to blows. For- 
tunatelv n(~ibodv iniured. 



FEBRUARY. 

Tues. I — Among the out-of-town \isitors for this 
week we are especially glad to welcome Mr. Lee Hutch- 
inson. 

Wed. 2 — Mo\ing Day for - -^'s. They prepare for 
visitors. 

Thur. 3 — Matinee dance. - -'^ and * ■'* 'I'heatre Par- 
ties. "The Time, the I'lace. and the Girl" — for every- 
body. 

[•"ri. 4 — Afternoon — *'' '^' "■' and -^ ''' -^. ( )i)en House. 
Evening — The r>iggcst Militar)' lUill e\er ! 

Sat. 5 — 6:30 A. ^L — Dance at - -"^ House. 2:00 P. 
aL — Student Dance. E\ening — EveryI)ody all in. 

Sun. 6— REMORSE. 

Mon. 7 — Profs all ex])ress hope that no one has let 
his studies interfere with his social duties I 

'ITies. 8 — Choral Society Concert. Miss Christine 
Miller. 

Wed. 9 — ]\Iiss \\'ilmoth "flunks" in Sociology. 

Thur. 10 — "Jonah P)ay" for Calendar Committee. 
A\"hat will the Editor say; 

Fri. II — Student Dance — a few left-over visitors. 

Sat. 12 — ^Ir. P>ritton gives Mr. Allender a black eve. 

Sun. T3 — Pad dav. W. PI. cases hold down the 
parlor. 

Mon. 14 — Cu]Md is the limit. Postman has no 
trouble in carrying his load. Too cold for even the 
English sparrows to flirt. 

Tues. 15 — Dr. Deahl reads account of X'alentine 
parties in the morning paper. Interviews the "social 
lights" in his classes. 

'A'ed. 16 — Mr. Starcher refuses to accept some chest- 
nuts, stating that he has plenty in "Simeons" class. 



257 



Thnr. 17 — 11:30 P. M. Everybody sleeping peace- 
fully in their little beds except Helen Wiestling who 
with a few friends was having a business meeting in 
her room. Oh no, it was no feast ! 

Fri. 18 — Committee goes to A-Ioving Picture Shows 
to look for news — failed. 

Sat. 19— Y. M. C. A. Stag Party. P.IG DOIN'S IN 
THE GYM. 

Sun. 20 — See February 13. 

Mon. 21 — Woman's League and Y. W. C. A. Re- 
ception. George Washington's Birthday Dance. 

Tues. 22 — Who made a noise like a cherry tree? 
Was it Fred Koelz? Oh no, he isn't being initiated, 
he's just going to a party. 

Wed. 23 — Minstrel Show. Who has the money? 
Give it to the faculty. 

Thur. 24 — Cadet Band Concert enjoj'ed by a large 
crowd. 

Fri. 25 — Education students have a much needed 
rest. 

Sat. 26 — Student Dance. 

Sun. 27 — "Dr. Buck" finds a number of letters left 
by Miss Vance in a hymnal in a fit of religious abstrac- 
tion, and, playing the role of Cupid, he sends the "Billy- 
cloos" speeding on their way. What would we do with- 
out Dr. Buck? 

Mon. 28 — Mr. Hunter returns from Charleston. 
How did Connelsville get along without him? 

MARCH. 

Tues. r — Anthony Fiala lectured on the North Pole. 

^^^ed. 2 — Prexy calls the Law School down for 

smoking in classes. Mr. Flowrney (after Prex takes 



his departure) — "Who in was that called me down?" 

Thur. 3 — First try-out for base-b^ll. Spring's com- 
ing. 

Fri. 4 — V. Y's. initiate. All the initiates wear out 
shoe leather except Miss A\'ilmoth who rides the street 
car. 

Sat. 5 — Armory Dance, 7 couples. Phillips Hall 
Dance, 10 couples. Miss Moore addresses Pan-Hellenic. 

Mon. 14 — Student to Prof. Trotter — "How many 
sections will there be in Torts?" 

Prof. Trotter — "Two sections. I will teach one and 
Prof. Barnes the other." 

Student — "Then there will be one in 'Torts' and one 
in "Torture.' " 

Tues. 15 — Junior Prom. Committee meets. Plans 
for the best Prom. ever. 

A\'ed. 16 — Dr. Deahl teaches Miss AA'ilmoth to use 
a pointer. 

Thur. 17 — Mr. Scott, when called on in Equity, 
endeavoring to read from an open book in the row 
ahead, is interrupted by Prof. Willey. "Perhaps \o\\ 
could do better with a long distance spy glass." 

Fri. 18 — What is this awful noise!? Mr. Finney 
has arrived with five trunks full of ties and other ac- 
cessories. 

Sat. 19 — "Smiles" and "Dick" start "cheating" for 
this Spring. 

Sun. 20 — Everybody goes to church to pray for 
protection against the wrath to come. 

Mon. 21 — Jus Henderson lost in the White J-^ouse. 
Never did find Room 132. 

Tues. 22 — A run on the drug stores. All the coca 
colas sold out. 



258 



Tluir. 24 — 
EXAMS. XUF CED. 

Fri. 25 — .\ grand rush for Imme to enjov the long 
( ?) vacation. 

Tues. i\[ar. 29 — Wild rush for a farewell course to 
Dr. Reynolds. 

Wed. 30 — fial arrives. His many former lady loves 
lejoice. 

Thur. 31 — An awful blight has fallen u])(>n the 
school. The Sports are discouraged and the French 
classes are unable to distinguish between French and 
a Boston accent. 

APRIL. 

Fri. I — The man at Imme in "The Man from Home." 
Sat. 2 — Mountain Club initiates. Messrs. Stemple. 



Powik. Louchery. serenade \\"oman"s Hall girls. Wild 
ap])lanse. 

Sun. 3 — Xew Easter bounets — and it rained I ! 

Mon. 4 — Easter Dance. 

Tues. 5 — Rhea and Hob start un the downward 
course — they visit the Moving Pictures for the first time. 

Wed. () — A. — "Say, Jack, I had a good trip on water 
today." 

J.— "How's that?" 

.A. — "Took a sale with Trotter." 

Thur. 7 — Miss Moore entertains English Club. 
Under classmen lulled to sleep by the strains of the 
French Song. 

Fri. 8 — Dramatic Club presents "One of the Eight." 

Sat. 9 — First game of the season. All the old stars 
back. 




259 



n 




1= 



260 



tepi)cn J^enton €Mn$. 



ITEPHEN BENTOX ELKIXS was hr.rn in Perry 
County, Ohio, Septemlier 2()th. 1S41. A few- 
years later he moved to Missouri where he re- 
ceived his early education in the common schools. 
He graduated from the University of Missouri 
in the class of i860. In 1864 he was admitted to the l)ar, 
and in the same year, he went to New Mexico to ])ractice 
law. While in New Mexico he took an active part in 
the i)ublic afifairs of that Territory, and was its represent- 
ative in the Forty-third and Forty-fourth CongTesses. 

After leaving Congress he came to \\>st Virginia 
and entered into business as a coal and railroad operator. 
I\Ir. Elkins ranks as one of the most successful business 
men of the country. He has had much to do in the 
industrial development of West A'irginia, — opening up 
vast fields of coal, enriching and bettering conditions all 
over the state, and incidentally making a fortune for 
himself. 

Mr. Elkins has d(^ne, and is now doing a greater 
work as a statesman. He was aiijiointed v^ecretarv of 



the War Department in 1891, and served until the end 
of President Harrison's term of ofifice. In 18(^4 he was 
elected to the United States Senate !:>}■ the unanimous 
vote of the Republican Legislature. He was re-elected 
in 1907 for a second term which expires in 1913. Mr. 
Elkins is chairman of the Senate Committee on Inter- 
state Commerce. As chairman of this committee he 
has had much to do with railroad rate legislation, and 
his name is connected with all measures that have to do 
with tlie l^etterment of railway transportation. Recent- 
ly he has added to his fame by causing to be appointed 
a commission to investigate the causes of the high cost 
of living. Coming at the time it did, this measure has 
caught the public attention to a remarkable degree. 
And the public is now eagerly awaiting the outcome of 
the investigation. Mr. Elkins justly deserves the praise 
and honor the nation gives him. and West \"irginia is 
indeed ])roud to ha\e such a man to represent her in 
the United States Senate. 



261 



i^atfjan |iaj> ^cott 

(^^^•: ATHAN BAY SCOTT is politically on 
■•^y/llliil '""^^^ prominent men in \\'est Virginia at the 



present day. And he has attained his position 
"T^ through honor and merit. When he was quite 

a young man he served several years in the 
Union army. When he left the armv lie settled in 
Wheeling. West Virginia. There he became interested 
in a number of business concerns and made himself 

universally respected. In 1880 he became President of ^ 

the Second Branch of the City Council. Two years ^i 

later he was elected to the West Virginia State Senate 
and continued in that office until 1890. He is a member 
of the National Republican Committee and also of the 
Executive Committee of that body. He w^as appointed 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue in 1897 by President 
McKinley and held that office for two years. He has 
been United States Senator since 1899 and during that 
time has done much for his state. Among other things 
in which he takes a prominent part, he is a member of 

the Rivers and Harbors Committee and has secured . * 

large appropriations for W'est Virginia. 



(I 



262 




263 



i^eabes; from tf)e IBiarp of a MoMt. 



Jan. 29th — Unusual excitement in the Hall. The 
girls are all going around with long slips of paper and 
getting other girls to make marks on them. They call 
them programs. Don't know what those are, don't care, 
either. Found a delicious piece of cheese in a waste- 
basket on the third floor. Those girls up there are all 
right, they always have something good to eat. 

Fel). 3rd — This morning at breakfast time ran into 
tJie dining room and hid under the sideboard to get 
away from the cat. Miss Moore was talking as usual. 
Heard her remark that the real Military would not be 
a bit nicer than ours, (jathered from the con\'ersation 
that there is to be a party here tomorrow night. Guess 
I'll stay up to see it, there may be something I could eat. 

Feb. 4th — Morning — Everybody very much excited. 
Girls say they don't know their lessons. Guess its to 
be a pretty big party. Didn't sleep very well last night, 
must have eaten too much dill pickle. 

Noon — Took a tour through the rooms this morning 
while the girls were all out. Some tpieer looking cos- 
tumes hanging around. Counted fourteen black things 
that look like men's coats, — funny dresses to wear to a 
party, T think. Five or six shiny black hats, too. Took 
a nap in one of them — Didn't sleep very well, tliough, 
as it was rather hard. 

Night — Well, the part3^'s over and they didn't have 
a thing I liked except the cake — I did get a little piece 
of that. About nine o'clock, I got under the radiator 
in the back parlor and sat down to see the fun. The 
rooms were all decorated with red, white and blue things 
and looked so nice I scarcely knew where I was. When 
thev came in each person got a little thing tied with 



ribbon and with a picture of a girl on the outside. 

The people that had on low necked dresses got ones 
tied with blue ribbon and those that wore coats got pink 
ones, I guess they were to represent boys. I thought 
the girl they called Miss Seven was the "belle of the 
ball." She wore a beautiful red dress. I'll bet her 
escort was proud of her. Miss Moore and Miss Home 
were very handsome in their lace robes. 

There were a lot of women to sit around and see 
that the people behaved themselves — and really Mrs. 
Vanderbilt had an awfully hard time, for some of those 
girls and boys acted scandalously. 

All at once there was an awful noise. It sounded 
as though the electric iron had fallen on the floor. Then 
the music started u|) and they all commenced to march 
around. AfteHthat, at intervals all evenings they skipped 
around the parlors. They stopped only to change part- 
ners. Sometimes two men would go after the, same girl, 
then the}' would have an awful time trving to decide 
which should hop with her. 

About tv/elve o'clock — perhaps it was two, I don't 
remember — some colored waiters I never saw 1)efore 
brought in the refreshments. There was pretty ice 
cream with cherries on top and very good cake with little 
flags sticking in it. I know the cake was good for I 
found some in the kitchen. They had candy, too. After 
they were all through eating they had what they called 
the Virginia reel — I don't know about the "Virginia" 
but they certainly reeled. 

They skipped around some more after that and a 
lot of things happened that I could tell about but really 
Fni so sleepy I'll have to go to bed. 



264 



Casiesi! ! ! 



Why are college cases like dog hair? 

Because they are bound to occur. 

College Cases: Peculiar college phenomena must 
strongly illustrating the peculiar affinity between a 
\acu()us, \apid. vainglorious, variegated, viscid, virides- 
tent. voluble near-man nonentity, and an idle. im])etuous. 
irres]>onsible. impressionable, inane, insipid indi\idual 
called a co-ed. The result is an indistinguishable blur 
moving slowly along through unfreciuented streets in the 
twilight; sometimes at lunch time it takes a peculiar 
sandwich efl'ect when the component ])arts stand face 
to face, on the ic_\- ]javement in front of Woman's hTall, 
unconscious of rain or chilling wind. Thus they stand 
for an hour or scj until the_\- are ])ried apart unfeelingly 
hv the cook with racuous dinner bell and a case knife. 



Alarriage : A very rare and unfortunate ending of a 
college case. 

Popular .Amusement Comjuiny : An organization 
composed of students who ha\e cases, 'i'hey verv un- 
selrtshl} furnish amusement and entertainment, either 
tragic or comic, for the Unixersit}' and the town gener- 
ally and gossi]) for the Hid Maid's Society in ])articular. 

The Evolution of a College Case. 

1. Case 

2. Xear Case 

3. Clear Case 

4. Smear Case 

Crash **!!!* MJ^cc?! 

5. Peer Case 
Finis. 



26i 




266 




267 



What is the difference between Prof. Poyne and 
Prof. Cram ? 

(3ne was discharged, the other went off accidentally. 

(Prep in EngHsh ) — "King Agrippa was the quarter- 
back on the Carlisle Indians." 

Dr. Armstrong- — 'AA'hat unnatural phenomenon oc- 
curred at the Battle of P>ethoren?" 

Student — "Paralysis of the Solar System." 

"Sammy" Brown — "Mr. Watkins, what do icebergs 
come from?" 

Marsh — "From cold weather." 

Prof. Brown was explaining some of the customs 
of the ancient people. One was that they ground up 
the bones of their ancestors and made a tea from them 
which they used for medicine. When he was through 
explaining, one of the students asked, "Professor, is 
that anything like the boneset tea we have nowadays?" 

Prof. Patterson (reading theme) — "I started down 
the hill at a pleasant gate (gait)" — "Well, I wonder 
what pretty girl lived there." 

Prof. Nolen — "Pll venture to assert that there is 
not a man in this class who has ever done anything 
to prevent the destruction of our forests." 

Wirt Faust — "I — er — Fve shot woodpeckers." 

Lee — "Why have you got that bandage on your 
hand?" 

Brownie — "I cut it trying to open a bottle. That's 
what I get for not having my corkpuller." 

Student — "Professor, what time will we get through 
the examination tomorrow?" 

Prof. — "I don't know whether you will get through 
at all or not." 



Dr. Callahan's latest conumdrum — "AWiy is the 
English people like a crop of potatoes?", 
"Because the best part is underground." 

Prof. 15rown — "Onlv one man escaped in the explo- 
sion of Martinique. Where was he at the time?" 
Class — "In prison." 

Nell McConnell who used to Ernestly Con-a-way 
at her books is proceeding more lively now. 

Miss Fling (In Zoology)— "Dr. Deahl— Oh, I beg 
your pardon, I mean Dr. Reese." 

Dr. Reese — "I don't object to being ideahlized." 

Prof. Trotter (In Agency) — "If I plant trees and 
raise peaches in one year — " 

Fats A\'yatt — "Hold on Prof, you can't do that." 

Lee (Talking to Fairmont over the telephone) — 
"How nice and dark it is. I can see the moon, can you?" 

Miss Core was giving a report on County Govern- 
ment. 

Dr. Callahan — "Do they use tin ])lates at the poor- 
house?" 

"Becky" — "\Vell, I don't just remember. It has 
been a good while since I was there." 

George Osborne (talking about marriages) — "And 
the girl was more in love with my dog than with me." 

Susan Smith — "As she couldn't get you she took the 
next best thing — your dog." 

Then hastily apologizing, she added, "You know, 
I always saj^ what I think." 

Clara was talking about a north pole dance. 

"I wonder what they would serve for refreshments," 
slie said. 

Alice — "Cookies, I suppose." 



268 



^omc W. "V. Wi. Jfaboriteg anti 
tfjeir Specialties. 

Glenn Hunter — "Ada." 

Anna Long — ■AN'mildn't you like to have me tor a 

sweetheart ?" 

■■ r.rownie" Hodges — "lilow the smoke away." 

Girls of Woman's Hall — "Call around anv old time." 

Clare Clifford — "Gone but not forgotten." 

Marsh W'atkins — "I've always been a good old s|:ort."' 

Virginia iSaker — "Home, sweet home." 

Miss Home — "Annie Laurie." 

Charles P)aker — "I'm a military man." 

Helen \'ance — "( )h, where is my wandering boy 

tonight?" 

Clarke Poole— "Girls ! Girls! Girls!" 

"Emmv" Harris — "Cuddle uj) a little closer, lovey 

mine." 

Lee Hutchinson — "I wonder who's kissing her now." 
Wirt Faust — "I want someone to call me dearie." 



209 



^ Mttiomtv for Jfre£if)men. 



Armory, numerous waist places where arms are 
put around. 

Campus, ground lying at an angle of from 45 to 
90 degrees. 

Censor, (Lat. census, sense; and or, without; with- 
out sense, or, without sense of humor) the fellow who 
took all the humor out of this book. 

Chapel, a gymnasium. 

Chapel Service, (deriv. from chapel, a gymnasium; 
ser., very ; and vice ; a very gymnastic vice, or a verv 
vicious gymnasium) a thing to be avoided. Note ab- 
sence of faculty. 

Commencement Hall, (synonym brewery) a punch- 
ing bag and a pipe organ ; a place to cc^nmence or brew 
trouble. 

Committee on Classification and Grades, a group of 
mirthless and restless lost souls under the impression 
that they must be ceaselessly busy with trivialities. 
Everybody else wonders why they were created. 

Committee on Student's Aid, young and impecun- 
ious members of the faculty who have formed an alliance 
in order to borrow money from the students. 

Committee on Ways and Means, a pleasant social 
group of inoffensive gentlemen, who have nothing to 
do but wonder why they were created. 

Freshman, a very green lobster, under size and has 
to be thrown overboard. 

Fife Cottage, the place where Gabriel will blow his 
fife or bugle first. 

Gymnasium, a punching bag under a church or a 
]:)ipe organ. Thus both are benefited. 



Junior, nothing but lobster. A variety said by 
chorus girls and co-eds to be very succulent. 

Library, a large room with alcoves and two easy 
chairs in each, occupied by a young man and a co-ed. 

Martin Hall, a $3,000.00 flight of steps and $300.00 
building. 

Music School, a factory over head. 

Political Enconomy, some chalk-marks on a black- 
board ; a place to sleep. 

(The) Preachers Association, an organized body of 
the clergy engaged to teach in the University but finding 
much sa\ing of souls to do through the state: Arch- 
l)ishoi). Nolan ; iiishops. Purinton, Reynolds and Hodges; 
plain preachers. Cox and Armstrong; beginners (guilty 
only of first offence). Chitwood, Patterson, and Callahan. 

Psychology, (gr. psuo, to breathe forth; choler, 
anger, and Gee, an expression of rage) a place to swear. 

Rhetoric, (gr. R-r-r, grind; and thor, a stove) the 
demnition grind; also a millstone to hang around the 
necks of freshmen before they are thrown overboard 

Science Hall, where psychology and political ecm- 
'..my are taught. 

Senior, a full-grown lobster, as large as they get. 

Sophomore, a very soft lobster, gets very red when 
roasted. Aluch prized by girls at the K. M. dances. 

Woodburn Hall, a large summer pavilion built in 
manv stvles of architecture and of all known materials. 
Repairs on the building always begin when the snow 
flies. Thus the teaching is accompanied by a kind of 
An\-il Chorus of hammers, saws and dynamite. Inside, 
a unique and wonderful combination. In the basement 



270 



they saw oft' your lej^' and in the attic vou liear the 
screech and between there are many who are ])leadins4-. 
In otlier cells of tlii> ])uildin^' there are inan\- who are 
being- vivisected. The word is deri\ed from wood, de- 
noting intention or obligation, and burn; ouglit to burn. 
• Woman's Hall, otherwise known as tlie hennerv. 
formerly beanery. Aristotle says. "Alan is a bird with- 
out feathers." Woman is a bird with feathers, hence 
hen : hens peck : hens peck at beans. A \-ery attractive 
building with the second story uindows near the ground. 
Peans are often taken in by that way. 




^-^^ 



271 














The SeasOKS "^VvOv^s 'QtUs, 
272 



TheW.V.U. 
Ladies Home 
Journal 



JUNE, 1910 



273 



tKfjat iaemintisf jHe. 



MarslT — "AX'hat becomes of all the pins that fall to 
the ground?" 

Clyde — "1 suppose they rust and fall to pieces." 

Marsh — "Well, I just thought they might turn into 
terrapins." 

Dr. Chitwood — "\\'hen Lord Darnley had David 
Rizzio killed, what did Mary Queen of Scots do?" 

Curt Amos — "She blew him up." 

Dr. Armstrong — "Miss Stone, what does 'ground- 
lings" mean?" 

Louise — "Commentators." 

JNIiller (translating French) — "Behold me, half past 
eight." 

Fellow Student — "Well, I always knew Miller had 
wdieels in his head but I never knew you could tell time 
by him." 

Dr. Truscott (meeting Dr. Chitwood on University 
Driveway) — "Say, Chitwood, wouldn't it save time if 
you took a room in this part of town?" 

Curt Amos (in Llistory) — "The Radicals and the 
Purintons were two new relisious sects." 



Prof. A\'illey (in Xegotiable Paper)— "Mr. Bock, 
suppose your horse is stolen and you buy it innocently, 
what's vour title?" 

Mr. Bock (cautiously) — ".\ horse is not a negotiable 
instrument." 

First Student — "Why do ].)eop]e have golden wed- 
dings?" 

Second Student — "To show to the world what their 
powers of endurance have been." 

Dr. Callahan — "We shall again postpone our test 
until Mondav." 

Aliss Prichard — "Oh, professor, I'll die if we don't 
get it over soon." 

Dr. Callahan — "That's another reason for postpon- 
ing it." 

The following advertisement was seen in the 
Athenaeum : 

"For Sale — One engagement ring almost new. See 
Ike ]\Ioran." 



274 



Possibilities of Somen's 
Oulubs. 



^^F^ ILXT women's clubs can make themselves felt 
lily can l;e exempliJied in this Unixersity. Fc 

stance an organization of women f(ir philan- 
thiopic ])uriMises could rule out all duties that 
interfere with social affairs exce|j)t for two 
L\enings each week; Sunday not included. A woman's 
1 est dull might set aside the time from one to three P. 
Al. for rest hours during which door Ijells and telephones 
siiould not l.e rung nor the city clock he allowed to 
strike. \ ery helj fnl indeed would he a Suret}' Club 
requiring all Tiiale students to adopt some title or in- 
--ignia to indicate their state with reference to matri- 
mon}-. In other schools the Student's llumane Clui) 
has been instrumental in abolishing those abominal)le 
"8 o'clocks" therel)y doing away a very disturbing ele- 
ment in a student's life — an early rising bell, and those 
hast}- non-F'letcherized breakfasts. To assure Librarv 
patrons greater freedom of s;)eech and especially to 
prevent j^rixate conferences from being interfered with a 
T. A. L. K. Club should be organized. Undoubtedly 
there is a jilace in \\". \'. V . for Women's clubs. 



^ OToman'si ^aU Cpisote. 



Kitty leaned on the window sill and gazed in ecstasy 
at the moon. "Engaged," she mumured rapturously. 
"Engaged !'" 

How she grieved for unhappy maidens who knew 
nothing of the unutterable bliss of being engaged ! 

A faint sigh was wafted to her from the adjoining- 
room. It floated past her out into the moonlight like a 
lost soul wandering in eternity. "Poor Mary" mumured 
Kitty. No wonder she sighed. A senior and not en- 
gaged. How sad! How unspeakably sad. It was sad- 
der than Anglo-Saxon. It was sadder than English Ten. 
It was sadder than anything. She could have wept for 
her. 

The delicate odor of spear mint chewing-gum was 
wafted to her from the street. The ice man was telling 
the cook good night. 

How disgusting! How dared the cook to be in love ! 
How dared the ice man! How dared anybody except 
her and — 

The sonorous peal of the ten-thirty bell reverberated 
through the silent corridors in AVoman's Hall. 

Reluctantly she turned from the window. She took 
ofif her Mary Garden braid and absently put up her front 
hair in curl papers. Dreamily she unscrewed the top of 
her cold-cream jar. How paltry it all seemed! Marv 



Garden braids, and curl papers and cold-cream. How 
paltry ! 

She closed her eyes to shut out the sordid scene, 
and stood in fancy on Sunnyside bridge with Him. It 
was moonlight. He (of the Dramatic Club) clasped in 
his hand a severed tress of her golden hair. 

"Promise me," she whispered, "that you will never 
part with that lock of hair." 

He pressed the golden tress to his heart. "Never," 
he cried. "Torture could not drag from me this treas- 
ured token." 

"How lo\'ely! How poetical!" she murmured. 

"You call me poetical," he answered, in his musical 
voice, "but aou are F'oetry." 

Iiow delicious! How perfectly lovely! Oh, that 
>he could always stand on Sunnyside bridge and listen 
to such elo(|uence. 

She opened her eyes with a sigh. Her dust-covered 
Greek grammar stared at her reproachfully from her 
desk. vShe turned the unfamiliar pages of her English 
History with a feeling of disgust. What did Greek 
Grammar have to do with love? A\'hat did English 
History have to do with it? Love was like Geology. 
It made you want to look out of the window and dream 
— and dream. 



276 



m^^ 





CD "^ 

(V 







Q 



^ 




miiat #tlier OSitJs ^^11 HoUg 



AVhen you are having a feast, pin trays and comb 
and brush trays make excellent plates in default of others. 

If you want to make your room comfortable and 
enticing to other girls, ha\-e plenty of trunks with good 
soft trunk covers for them to sit on. Girls do not like 
chairs when they can get trunks. 

At spreads some [jeople have trouble getting the 
olives out of the bottles. In this case, hatpins are an 
excellent substitute for forks. Shoehorns do very well 
for knives and spoons. 

It might be of interest to ])rospective brides to know 
that very good ironholders can be made from colored 
wrapping twine knit into solid holders with scalloped 
borders. These are useful as well as ornamental. 



By careful cutting up-to-date waists may be made 
from the trains of superannuated Military Ball dresses. 

When your best embroidered sliirtwaist Ijegins to 
iiave holes in it as the result of careless washerwomen, 
if you are a clever girl, you can work them as eyelets 
in the pattern. 

A good way to get money to go home on is to have 
an auction and sell all the things you won't need at 
home. While there you can get a new supply. 

A \-erv good way to make pin money is, if you had 
English lo to Simeon, to sell those themes to the suffer- 
ers under Pat. This has been carried out very well 
by various persons, who will testify to its success. 



278 



#ooti iHannersf anb (ioob Jf orm. 



JPp ^usian itlaxtuell itloore. 



Is it proper for a boy and girl to stand on the front Xdt if you are upper classmen l^ecause tlie Dean 

steps and talk before meal time? probalily expects you to set an exam])le for the younger 

EMMY. I girls. 

Xot before breakfast but it is perfectly correct be- | ^^ it the correct thing to throw orange skins and 

fore dinner and supper if they do not talk more than apple cores into the waste paper baskets? 

twenty minutes after the bell has rung. THIRD FLOOR. 

Should 1 allow a young man to smoke in my pres- Xot at all. 1 think I ha\e exjjressed my o])inion 

ence? several times before in this column. 

CLARA D. 1 ha\e a date with two men for the same dance. 

P>y no means. Fire-engines are more useful than What shall I do about it? 

ornamental. XEA'A. 

How shall 1 announce the engagement oi my room- It certainly shows very great carelessness on your 

mate? ' part to get yourself intc^ such a scrai)e. I shoidd advise 

EMILY. j } ou to stay at home. 

You might have the Dean of A\'omen announce it at I wore a short-sleeved dress to dinner the other day 

table or perhaps Prexy would consent to announce it and got called down for it. Isn't it all right? 

in Cha:iel. ALICE. 

The other day I was criticized for walking with Xo. You should take _\our short sleeved dresses 

two lioys at one time. Isn't it perfectly proper? liome and have long sleeves ])ut in them. Besides, short 

]VlARY :\lc. slee\es are out of style. 

It is not. especially if the boys are taller than your- Should I allow a young gentleman to help me across 

self. streets or up the steps? 

Is it proper for a crowd of girls to eat tangerines ESTHER, 

at midnight? Xot unless vou are over sixtv. 
HELEN. 

279 




280 




281 



g)})e Wears; a CJjallense in ||er ^aix. 

She wears a challenge in her hair, 

A (hini;lini;- sprig of mistletoe; 
Sonic ciiy ciMitrivance holds it there. 

And v\ill not let it go. 

Below, the (juestioning brows are arched. 
And daring eyes with darkling depths; 

Where one by sandy desert parched 
Might drink and rest. 

The scarlet-vibrant bow is bent. 

The while a dazzling look beguiles; 

The arrow from the bow is spent — 
She smiles. 

A^et who would dare his ardor vent. 

And to that challenge make reply? 
Alas, 1 know it is not meant 

For such as L 

A'Vell know I that my goddess cares 
Rut little how mv armours fare ; 

Yet must 1 worshi]) while she wears 
A challenge in her hair. 



282 



A Di 



FIRST PRIZE STORY BY 
DAVID BRIGHT REGER 




OMINGO SUAREZ lay in his hammock and 
smoked. His brother Miynel hiy in another 
hammock nearln- and smoked. 'Jdiev were 
«\i/^ sheltered from the hot Cuban sun bv a roof 

"^^V-^ of palm-leaf thatch which was built on a 
framework of poles directly in front of Do- 
mingo's house. The house itself, which liad no floor 
and only one room, was also covered with thatch. Its 
walls were made of the thin stems of the royal palm 
which Domingo had picked up when thev fell from the 
trees. They were cool and they were cheap and Do- 
mingo desired nothing better. In a little shed near the 
house their wives were cooking \enison and talking. .As 
fast as tiie meat was cooked. the\' hung it to the rafters 
far above the reach of the children and dogs by which 
they were surrounded. The children were not hungry, 
l)Ut the dogs were half starved and would ha\e m^de 
short work of the \'enison if the\' could ha\e reached it. 
Domingo and Miguel were of ])ure v^])anish blood. 
Their wives were black. There had been no Sijanish 
girls in the region where they lived and so. following 
the philosophy of their race, they had married black 
women and were content. Their father had li\ed in 
the clearing beneath the palms. A\'hen Miguel had 
grown to be a man he had built a new house at the other 
end of the clearing while Domingo lived in the house 
that his father had left him. There was a clearing of a 
few acres around the houses. A part of it was given up 
to the cultivation of yams and plantain and maize. The 
remainder was enclosed by a high fence of palmetto 



pole> and was used for a corral. Domingo and Miguel 
did not own the land ujjon which they lived. It belonged 
to a ricli S]janiard in v^antiago who allowed them to live 
on it free of rent. 

in the morning of this particular day Miguel had 
mounted his horse and, taking his gun and his hounds, 
had gone hunting and had brought home a deer. This 
meat, together with ]jlanlain and yams from the clearing, 
would feed their wives and children for manv davs; so 
there was nothing to do except live and eat. 

It was nearly three o'clock and the sun was at its 
hottest, when the}' were dsturbed l)v the api)earance of 
two horsemen who rode into the clearing at a brisk trot. 
They soon reached the house where both families were 
collected. 

"Good e\-ening!"" they called loudly. 

Domingo sprang from h\> hammock. 

"Good evening. Manuel Morro!" he exclaimed and 
rushed out to the two men. 

Aliguel followed him. Manuel Abjrro, a light color- 
ed mulatto of a])out lift}- years age. dismounted and 
shook hands with them warmly. The other man wh() 
\vas a well dressed S])aniard also dismounted. Manuel 
introduced him briefly. "This is Senor Hernandez of 
?\ue vitas," he said. 

Domingo took their panting horses and led them 
into the corral, while Miguel brought out two home-made 
chairs with seat> of deer-skin and invited them to sit 
down. 



283 



"Dolores, Fatima, coffee!" he yelled loudly to the 
two women in the shed. 

By this time Domingo had returned from the corral 
and had climbed back into his hammock. In a few 
moments one of the women came with four cups of black 
coffee, one of which she gave to each of the men. The 
visitors accepted their coff'ee gratefully and drank it with 
relish. 

Manuel Morro was well known to the Suarez broth- 
ers. He owned a plantation down on the coast five 
leagues away and was a man of importance in the thinly 
inhabited coast country. The man whom he had intro- 
duced as Hernandez was a stranger. AVhen Morro had 
finished his coffee he took off' his hat and took from its 
crown some cigars which he offered to the other men. 
He lighted his own and puffed in silence for a moment. 

"Doriiingo," said he, "we are here on important busi- 
ness and must hurry. We have a plan by which we 
shall make ourselves rich, but we need the help of some 
good men or it will fail. I have known you and Miguel 
a long time and can trust you. If you will help us a 
few weeks we will pay you more money than you ever 
saw before. The work will be dangerous but, if you 
will help us, you will have money enough to live in 
Santiago and smoke the finest Havana cigars the rest 
of your lives." 

Domingo's eyes glistened. "Mother of God!" he 
muttered in a low voice. "We will do anything for 
money. Danger is nothing. We have fought in the 
revolutions since we were boys and are not afraid. 
What is it you want? Is there to be another war?" 

"No," said Morro, "Listen to me and I will tell you. 
Senor Hernandez has a big ranch at Nuevitas and needs 



a lot of cattle. He has sold all his fat steers and musi: 
either get some more in the island or go to Venezuela 
for them. He told me all this when I was in Santiago 
a few days ago and I at once thought of a grand plan 
for all of us to get rich. We will live in Paradise the 
rest of our lives." 

"In the name of the Twelve Apostles," broke in 
Miguel sourly, "tell us what you mean. We cannot get 
lich unless we know what is to be done." 

"I am telling you as fast as I can" said Morro. "As 
I said, Senor Hernandez wants cattle and wants us to 
get them for him. He does not care where they come 
from, l:)ut he must have them. Now you know that 
there are hundreds of fine cattle on the Miraflores Ranch 
which those rascals, the Americans, own over at the 
mouth of the Toredo River. These men are villians. 
All Americans are villians and thieves and it will serve 
them right to drive off their cattle. Since the last revo- 
lution they have stolen our government and have kicked 
us out of the rich offices where our people used to live 
in ease when we had a Cuban president. The Miraflores 
Ranch is only four leagues from here and there is a 
trail to it that few men except you and Miguel know. 
A week from now the Americans will be celebrating their 
great national holiday, the Fourth of July. It will be 
a grand chance to drive off their cattle while they eat. 
I have been to the ranch and know their plans. The 
chief told me that all the men are to be gathered around 
the Casa Grande, where he lives, and are to see an Amer- 
ican base-ball game. There will be none to watch the 
cattle, which are feeding several miles from the Casa 
Grande. \A'ith a dozen good men we can ride into the 
plantation at daylight of the fourth and before night we 



284 



can drive them all here to yotir house where we will 
camp for the night. The next da}' we will take them to 
P'nerto Redondo where 1 live. (Jn the third dav we will 
load them on steamers which Senor Hernandez will get 
from ^"antiagii and he will then have no trouble to take 
them to Xue\itas where he wants them. The Ameri- 
cans will ne\'er catch us. TheN' ha\'e no cuhans on their 
ranch. The fools hired (lallei^'os and Jamaicans and 
they have no one to show them the trails. If thev tried 
to follow us they vcould i^et lost and. besides that, we 
could kill them if they should hnd our trail." 

Until this time Hernandez had said nothing. He 
now spoke. 

"Suarez, if you and your brother will find a dozen 
men and hel;) dri\e those cattle to Puerto Redondo. I 
will y'i\-e _\"ou two thousand pesos each, ^'ou can trust 
me. I have the money and. if \-ou do not get it, there 
will be enough of you to cut mv throat. What do vou 
say?" 

"That is a lot of money." said Domingo. "I think 
we will do it." 

"Do it I" said Miguel. "Of course we will do it. 
Curses on the Americans! They are clearing out the 
jungle and dri\ing all the deer to the mountains and 
soon we will ha\e to work if we do not do something. 
!t will be a grand re\'enge." 

The plan of Hernandez, though daring, was feasible. 
The Miraflores Ranch, which lay at the mouth of the 
'J'oredo River on the north coast, was isolated by many 
miles of jungle from anv other exensive plantation. Its 
only way of communication v.ith the outer world was 
bv means of the occasional freight steamers that the 
owners chartered to bring in su])plies. it was entirely 



unprotected by the Rural (iuards There were no roads 
leading awa}- from it. exce])t a few obscure trails that 
only the men (^i the jungle, like Domingo and Miguel, 
knew. It would be an eas_\ matter to drive the cattle 
awa}', and the chances were few that the Americans 
would ever find them. It was the rain}' season and the 
fierce tr)rrents which fell e\erv e\"ening wotdd destrcn- 
all signs of the trail of the cattle. 

Hernandez and Morro spent the night at Palmyra, 
where the ^'uarez brothers li\ed. and completed the de- 
tails of the raid. In the morning Domingo and Miguel 
scoured the trails for a radius of fifteen miles and by 
evening had gathered in a dozen of the most dare-de\il 
cutthroats that a hundred years of war had been able to 
i roduce. The next day. long before dawn. Hernandez 
started to the railroad, which touched the north coast 
ten miles west of Puerto Redondo, and that night he 
reached Santiago. It took him another day to charter 
four small steamers to go to Puerto Redondo. He had 
])lenty of money and ofi^ered a large cash sum for the 
use of the vessels for a week, which the owners were 
(|uick to acce]jt. The steamers were coaled and ])ro- 
visioned in a great hurry by stevedores and sailors and. 
in a short time, had cleared from Santiago with the 
declared jjurjiose of carr\ing cargoes of fruit from the 
north coast to Xew York. Two days later they anchor- 
ed in Puerto Redondo which, though verv small, had 
deep water. Morro had a narrow ])ier jutting out from 
ihe shore, where he had often loaded his own cattle 
into coasting steamers when he wanted to ship them 
to the Santiago market. 

The night of the third of July Domingo Suarez and 
his ruffians sle])t bv a s])ring on the edge of the Mira- 



flores Ranch. In the morning" thev rode quietly around 
the four hundred cattle which the Americans had im- 
ported from Venezuela a few weeks before, and by ten 
o'clock had them plodding along the trail which led to 
the Palmyra houses. As Manuel Morro had foreseen 
the unsuspecting Americans had allowed all their Galle- 
gos and Jamaicans to gather the day before for the 
holiday event, so that it was an easy matter to drive 
away the catttle. Their grazing ground was not in 
sight of the manager's house, and it was too far away 
for the cries of the Cubans to be heard as they rounded 
up the cattle. 

By four o'clock Domingo and his men had driven 
the cattle into tlie Palmyra corral, where they had hard- 
ly secured them before the tropical storm, which Morro 
relied upon to conceal the signs of their passing, had 
come up from the south-east across the great desolate 
jungle-wastes and was deluging the island. 

The next morning the cattle were driven to Puerto 
Redondo, where they were turned into a field of Guinea 
grass on Morro's ranch and allowed to rest and eat. At 
ten o'clock that night a scout, whom Domingo had left 
to see what would be done at Miraflores, rode into 
Puerto Redondo and reported that the theft was not yet 
known at the ranch. 

In the morning the cattle were separated into small 
herds and driven upon the steamers that, by turns, were 
tied up at the pier. Some of the steers made frantic 
efforts to escape when they were driven to the narrow 
gangway, but the Cubans surrounded them and goaded 



them on until, in despair, they w'ere forced upon the 
steamer. 

AA'hen the last load was driven on board and all was 
ready to cast loose from the pier. Hernandez yelled to 
the deck-hands to haul in the gangway and started to go 
on board. In a moment he was seized roughly by Do- 
mingo vSuarez and thrown upon his back. He attempted 
to release himself and might have succeeded, if Miguel, 
who was also on the pier, had not drawn his machete 
and swung it threateningly above Hernandez's head. 

"You dog of a Spaniard !" growled Domingo, "you 
thcTUght vou would sail oft' with your stolen cattle and 
leave us without any pay. AA'here are our four thousand 
pesos? If vou haven't them we will cut your throat and 
feed your carcass to the sharks." 

Hernandez raised himself part way up and took from 
liis pocket a heavy wallet, from which he counted the 
money in hundreds and fifties, and divided it between 
the two brothers. They threw down their weapons and 
helped him to rise. 

"Senor Hernandez" said Domingo as he gave him a 
parting hand shake, "we are not angry because you tried 
to get away, but we remembered those Havana cigars." 



Author's Note: — This story describes the possible 
fate of four hundred cattle which, in the summer of 1907, 
were stolen from an American ranch, on the north coast 
of Cuba, and of which only a few were ever recovered 
bv the owners. 



286 



nil 



II 



ri 



Pin 



:by 



^^-MI^ vduni,;- man ])ulled IVdiTi hi> imcket the frosl- 
" itten rose which a few minutes Ijefnre he had 
caug'lit in passing- from where it danijled in the 
cre\ice of an old liriok walL lie frowned ]jee\ish- 
then laughed a little as he counted the petals. 
There were ele\en whole ones and a twelfth which had 
heen ])inched through at the middle. 

"Eleven-thirty." he said aloud. "I'.erla is be.^-inning 
to choose rather late hours for her a])pointments. 1 fear 
her re]nitation will suffer." Ami he tried to lau^^h a,^ain. 

The dusk thickened as he stood in the centre of his 
room holding;- the mutiltated flower, and the wind swept 
hy outside the windows with a rising- cadence of cor> 
l)laint. There was nothing soft or languorous in the 
November twilight. It rose from the ground with 
soml)re insistence and crejit in at the o- en windows, a 
sullen t1ood. bearing the death-blight of the summer. 

The summer was dead, and buried with it was the 
pleasant follies of the past. Kindiv hands beckoned in'n 
untrodden paths — Her sacred i)resence called him " * *. 

The young man roused himself from the beginnings 
of a re\erie. walked to a window, and tossed the rose 
carelessly outside. The fretful wind refused it. and a 
gust that billowed the embroidered curtains and set all 
the shades flap].)ing laid the rejected oft'ering at his feet. 

"\'ery well," said the }'oung man. and threw the 
rose on a study table that stood at hand. He hesitated 
a moment, then left the room to return with a tumbler 
of water which he poured into a saffron-tinted bowl and 
dro )i)ed the rose on its surface. 



j "^'ou"re the last." he said to the flower with decision. 

■ "I'll keep \-ou to remind me of that." 

It was nearly six hours later when the young man 
threw awav book and cigarette. sna])ped off' the lights., 
and snatching up his caj) as he passed through an ante- 
room, hastened down stairs and into the street. He 
turned down a side street and met the wind where it 
issued with a shriek from a bleak alley; he shuddered 
with the hrst chill of winter and raised the collar of his 
overcoat about his neck. He was hastening l)y the near- 
est way to a certain corner a,t which he had often waited 
in former davs — those days that already seemed a ])art 

I of the jiast. 

] .\t the corner he saw a \-oung woman standing. 

With a bluff" protest the wind fronted him before he 
could cross the street and whi; ];)ed a corner of his over- 
coat around a broken ])aling of the fence against which 

] he was forced by its violence. He jerked his coat free 

impatientlx- and crossed the street with haste. 

ISeneath the v. bite glare of an arc light the girl was 
waiting. The bright lips and midnight hair glowed in 
the radiance, while the paleness of her face made foil for 
the diamond glitter of her l)lack e}es. 

"It is time," she said, with a Latin gesture, and 
before the young man could sjseak. "I wait for you 
halfa hour." 

She paused for his answer. He made none. Init 

j a'v'oided her cacs and allowed his own to wander oxer 

the fair lines of her graceful body, disclosed b}' the wind 
that fluttered her skirts. 
287 



The girl was young, but early matured, as are those 
whose blod is heated by the ardent sun of Italy. She 
might have served as a model for a diminutive Venus, 
but her eyes held nothing of the tender loveliness of 
that divinity. - 

So' thought the young man as he diligently sought 
to avoid them by looking first at her billowing skirt, 
then at her coat-sweater brilliant in the colors of his 
college, and so up to the black fur toque which crowned 
her inky hair. Through the toque from side to side was 
thrust a single long and vicious-looking hat]Mn, which 
he had never seen her wear before. The head of the pin 
was fashioned in the shape of a dagger handle, tastefully 
wrought in gold. This, in conjunction with its abnormal 
length, served to convert the ornament into little less 
than a stilletto. In the filigree work of the hilt a group 
of little brilliants sparkled. The young man wondered 
which one of the fellows had given her this. There had 
been a time when he would have felt jealousy, but that 
time was past. 

She caught his eyes and held them. "I come to ask 
you why you lie to me." 

"What do you mean?" The young man shifted 
his position. 

The girl drew from a pocket of her coat-sweater a 
ragged piece torn from the columns of a newspaper, and 
holding it so as to catch the rays from the arc light, 
read very slowly : 

"The engagement of Charles Loomis Osborne, 1063 
North Fifteenth Street, and Miss Clara Woodford, 875 
Maple Avenue, has been announced. The wedding will 
take place in June, following commencement week at 
the state university, where Mr. Osborne is now in his 
senior vear." 



"\'\'here did you get that?" 

"From one a your home papers I find in 3'our room 
when I go to see you and you not there." 

"Well?" 

"Why you tell me you not marry nobody else? 
Why you tell me you marry me?" 

Osborne wrenched loose his eyes and again looked 
at the hatpin. There was a fascination in the brilliants 
almost e(|ual to the fascination of her eyes. 

"I thought you knew I was not in earnest about 
that, l!erta. But if \nu reallv believed me 1 am very 
sorr}'." 

"Yes, I believe it. I thought you — love me." 

Osborne winced. "It's too bad, lierta — but if you 
trv VDU will soon forget. As for that," he continued 
flippantly, "many a fellow in this old school would be 
glad to own you for mistress of his heart." 

"It is not de lieart dey give. It is only — " 

"For instance." Dsborne concluded, "the one who 
gave you that hatpin." 

"Dis!" she exclaimed, in a sudden fit of animation. 
"Dis pin?" and she jerked the ornament from her tocpie, 
which fell at her feet. "Xo fella give me dis. My 
father bring it ^vith him frc^m Italia. You see de shiny 
stones? Dey are real diamonds. Listen! I tell you 
hoAv he get it. My father steal it from a lady." She 
laughed. "Dis lady was ugly. She not lova husband. 
She jealous of preety girls. One night dey both in 
cab — he die of heart," her voice sank to a sharp whisper, 
"but doctor say dey one little hole in his throat * * * *. 
My father work for dis lady — in de garden. One day 
he dig up a little box. Inside — dis p\n !" 

Unnoticed her t()(|ue had rolled before the wind to 
Ihe edge of a long bridge. Tifis bridge stretched across 



288 



a dee]) ra\ine which cut (iff tme ^ectinn nf tlie town finm 
another. Across the hridL^e the dark nni\ersity lniilding> 
loomed behind the tnssin^ hous^hs nf manv trees. 

I!uth fnlldwed the mUini^- tu(|ue and Osborne jncked 
it np. His ai^itatinn was visible, lie started to speak 
but waited till a Idud and wailini.^- .^nst of wind should 
sul)side. ilerta"s cacs ^\■ere ai^ain seekiuL;' his. He felt 
them on him but handed her the toc|ue without looking 
up. She stood holding it in one hand and the glittering 
hatpin in the other while the shrieking wind hurried a 
grey mist up from the river and spread it o\'er the sk}-. 
quenching the rirst stars one by one. 

"You rememlx'r dis bridge?" 

Osbortie laughed uneasily. "I shall not soon forget 
it." 

■'You remember — down below — where you spread 
your overcoat for me?" 

"Yes." 

"How long ago was dat?" 

"Six months." 

"You ha\e decide never to go dere again?" 

"Yes." Os1:)orne was staring hard at the hatpin in 
a desperate attem]3t to avoid the relentless eyes of his 
questioner. 



"You will go with me deie — now?" 

The wind ceased to moan and the night waited 
breathless and still. 

"You will go with me dere — now." It was no long- 
er a (juestion. 

Osborne made a final struggle to esca])e here eyes. 
His gaze swept the vicinity liopelessly. The sudden 
unnatural calm made all objects apparitions of dismay. 
The roots of two giant oaks on the slope of the ravine 
seemed to writhe with torture in the shadow. The 
trunks stood stiff' and motionless with horror. 

"Look at me **"*** Cornel" 

He took her arm without a Isackward glance and 
walked down the slope to where the shadow of the 
bridge loomed black. 

When some children, ])laying under the bridge next 
day. found the bod}- they ran screaming to their mother. 
A crowd collected, the corpse was identified, and carried 
to the young man's rooms. Refore its removal the 
coroner came and examined Osborne's body. His face 
wore the l)lank expression of a sleepwalker. There was 
one little hole in the throat. 




?H9 





290 



OLLIE FOSTER HOOVER 




ni|)any-sture 
f an unusual 
warm .\i)ril 



^^^ HE vacant house op])()sitt' the t 
^fj, at I'ine Fork had been the scene 

acti\-it_v during- the afterniKin of 

day. 'I'lie hustle was due to the drscmeiy 

of tJTe Keaton's cow. dead at the foot of a 
2 preci]Mce and to the sui^g'estion of Airs. Kinzer. 

the wife of the new superintendent uf the lum- 
ber cam]), that something- ])e dune for the unfortunate 
famil}-. for the Keatons were ];oor and there were all 
those children. .\ow, when the shadows were loni^" the 
result of the work could be seen in clean swejit floors. 
rude ta])]es coxered with white cloths, a row of cakes, 
and. in a back room, a number of freezers, some milk, 
egys. and other essentials for the makin;^- of ice cream. 

When .Mrs. Searc_\- had obserx'ed from her white- 
washed collate o\ er the way that the menial tasks were 
done and the women t^one. she came with a 1 asket of 
sweet williams and \iolets and IjCi^an to decorate the 
tables. As she moved about in arranging the sweet 
spring- flowers, she carried herself with much dignity 
though there was no one to 1 e im])ressed. She alwavs 
walked with the haughty assurance made possible by a 
tine idi\sii|ue and a distinguished bearing, e\en though 
she were merel}- passing through one of the alley's tcj 
get a jiail of buttermilk from a woman that k'ept a cow. 
\\'as not her husband head inspector of the luml)er camp? 
^\'as not she the mother of twehe year old Cdenna. the 
prettiest, brightest child to be found in a dozen camps? 
Did she not have one of the few five room cottages? 



Did she not Iia\e a ])iano — the only one in the camp till 
recently — on which she ])layed? 

At this hour of the day tiie camp was unusually 
(;uiet. The noisy mill was >till, the com])anv store was 
closed, and the tired men and their families were at 
su])per. Odors of coffee, fried potatoes, and onions 
Boated out from the cottages. As Mrs. Searcy worked 
she looked fretpientl}- through the back door at the i)lain 
brown cottage on the slo])e where Mrs. Kinzer, the new- 
comer, lived. I\Irs. Searcy had made her hr>t call the 
day before. Xow. she could look through the ])l;!in 
exterior and see tiiose rooms made beautiful bv the 
lavish e.\])enditure of money and the exercise of good 
taste. She could see again ihe beautiful co|(jring of the 
rugs and drajjcries. the elegeant simplicit\- of the fm-ni- 
lure such as no one had ever seen in I'ine Fork before. 
She could feel again thesuri)rise at having been recei\-ed 
by a gracious young v, oman. who had the unmistakable 
suggestion of the city's luxury and culture in her clothes 
and bearing. 

.Ml (lay .Mrs. Searcy had felt disturbed. Friendli- 
ness and hostility towards this beautiful stranger, who 
had come to claim preeminence in Pine Fork, alternated 
in her miml. She was uncertain as to her attitude to- 
wards .Mrs. Kinzer. but she was intensely interested. 
She had looked into a true mirror. She knew that 
though she j ut on her ]M-ettiest dress and carried herself 
with greater dignit\' than e\er before — if i)ossible — she 



291 



was thrown into the shadow and, accordingly, she was 
dissatisfied. 

Just as she was finishing her work, ]Mrs. AA'ilHs, 
Mrs. Searcy's next door neighbor, entered the room. 
She held in one hand a large white cake, and with the 
other she grasped the front gore of a clumsy black skirt 
to keep it from under her feet. She had ascended the 
steps with difficulty for she was very stout, and she 
panted and wheezed as she crossed the floor and set the 
cake among the others. Two little girls, Glenna Searcy 
and Junia \A'ilIis raced in after her. 

"Mamma," cried Glenna throwing back her long- 
brown braids, "Just see that beautiful cake! The others 
make no show at all beside it !" 

Mrs. Searcy automatically commented on the beauty 
of the cake, wondering at the same time if it were prob- 
able that any of Mrs. Kinzer's heavy dark hair were 
false. There were so many braids ! Studied indiflfer- 
ence to the merit of the cake was stamped on Mrs. 
Willis's plain honest face. She began to count a pile of 
saucers, but quit to talk. 

"Law, Mrs. Searcy there certainly wuz some hard 
work done in these rooms this evenin'. They wuz a 
plumb sight. You know them Collines lived here last 
and there wuz tobacco spit and spider webs everywhere. 
Mrs. Grabill and Jimmy Brown carried them heavy 
tables from clear over to the Club House. But pore 
Mr. Keaton's a mighty good man and deserves it all. 
And wuzn't it nice of Mis Kinzer to make us think of 
doin' this? She's one sweet woman!" Mrs AA^illis 
finished with fervent enthusiasm. Mrs. Searcy had been 
accustomed to hearing that unpolished speech of Mrs. 
Willis for several months. For the first time it grated 
on her. She had been hearing again in memorv the 



soft liquid tones of Mrs. Kinzer's refined conversation. 

"Airs. Kinzer's cake won't be any nicer than ma's," 
piped Junia. 

"AA'ell, that cake orter be good. Its got the whites 
of eighteen eggs in it and eggs are thirty-five cents a 
dozen," conceded Mrs. A\^illis. 

"Oh Mrs. AA-'illis" cried Glenna, throwing her arms 
around the big woman, "Do tell me what's in that cake 
besides eggs and flour and sugar, please! 1 won't tell 
anybody." Glenna was aglow with curiousity and ex- 
citement. Her brown eyes were shining. 

"Law, child, nobodv but me and the Almighty 
knows what's in that cake, and shan't till tonight. I 
drawed the curtains up and locked the door diefore I 
made it. Juneljug shan't ha^'e a single guess at it, for 
if she'd happen to hit it, people'd say she'd peeped. And 
m_v ole man shan't guess either. But I tell you, gentle- 
men, that cake ain't going to be easy to guess. The 
harder they are to guess the more money they bring 
and T always make them hard. I made one over at 
Beaver and put a slipper of one of Junebug's dolls in it, 
and it never wuz guessed. The guesses amounted away 
up." Mrs. A\"illis began again to count saucers. 

"I'm going to guess at this cake and win it too. 
You see if I don't ! Come on, Junia. there's Mr. Fleming- 
come to open the store door. AA'e can get that ribbon 
now." Glenna ran ofl:', her braids flying. The slower 
Junia followed. 

"Them children are just like young colts, always 
loping around," said Mrs. AA'illis, turning around from 
Vv'atching the little girls. "Mrs. Searcy, you mustn't 
work here anv longer. A'ou'll tire yourself out and 
bring on one of them faintin' spells. You go home and 



292 



rest, dearie, and I'll cut these cakes. They ain't much 
more to do." 

Mrs. Searcy had always been proud and exclusive, 
but for several months she had shown Airs. Willis a 
I'riendliness that had amazed the other women of the 
camp. They were becoming used to the intimacy now. 
When Airs. Willis had moved into Pine Fork. Airs. 
Searcy had made no effort to get acquainted, but for a 
long time pursued her old way of visiting none and 
receiving graciously only a few of her husband's friends. 
She preferred to spend her time in reading the late 
books to associating with the wi\'es of the common 
laborers. But one day she was frightened by a dizzy, 
stifled feeling and by a severe pain at her heart. She 
sank to the iloor unconscious. A\'hen she again opened 
her large dark eyes, she found Airs. AA'illis bending over 
her with infinite kindness and solicitude in her dark 
Indian face. Airs. Willis could not find enough to do 
to be commensurate with her willingness to be of help 
in that critical time. In that hour a sudden full-grown 
friendship sprang up, ready, like the genie of Alladin's 
lamp to manifest itself at any time. 

Airs. AA illis with emphatic candor spread the news 
f'ver the cam]j tliat she had been "raised" a servant girl. 
Airs. Searcy did not heed. It was obvious that Airs. 
AA'illis's face was homely, her clothes coarse, her manner 
rough, her cottage almost bare of furniture ; Airs. Searcv 
Avas apparently blind to exerything but Airs. AA'illis's 
open, kindly nature. Confidence advanced apace. Be- 
fore the friendship was a week old. Airs. Searcy had 
entrusted a secret that she had never confided even to 
her husband. Airs. AA'illis told her chronic troul:)le. the 
unfaithfulness of her husband, and even related how 
she had hunted out and soundlv beaten a woman who 



had been receiving the money she and junia needed for 
food and clothing. Tlie friendshijj liatl done both good. 
Hach with sunflower susceptiblity had turned her better 
brighter side to the warmth of svm])athv she found in 
the other. 

But on this evening, when the memory of her call at 
the house on the slope was still fresh. Airs. Searcy could 
not keej) down her first feeling of contempt for her friend. 
The word, "servant" came to her mind again and again 
as fittingly descriptive. And when the cakes were cut 
and everything done, and they walked to their cottages 
together. Airs. Searcy was annoyingly aware of the 
errors of speech, the awkard carrage. the homelv clothes 
of the other, and was glad that there was no chance of 
Airs. Kinzcr's recognizing or e\en obser\ing them in 
the dusk that covered the camp. 

That night the kerosene lamps shown on a medley 
crowd in the house opposite the store. In the back room 
hurr}ing, chattering women turned freezers, dished out 
ice cream, washed and dried dishes. Young girls stepped 
I riskly about waiting on the tables. Sawvers. stackers, 
filers, millwrights and inspectors assembled there intent 
on making merry, for this ice cream sup])er was a rare 
event in Pine Fork. The fumes of v.hiskey mingled 
with the smoke of tobacco. The much-observed Airs. 
Kinzer was there, talking in her tender rising inflection 
to anyone who happened to be near. Airs. AA'illis was at 
work among the women in tlic back room. Airs. Searcv 
lingered near Airs. Kinzer. 

The company store was thronged with men of many 
nationalities. Laborers, widely differing in complexion, 
formed long chattering lines against the counters, wait- 
ing for the hurried salesmen to tender them the desired 
commodities in return for the desired "script" tliev pre- 



293 



sented. At half-past nine young Fleming put out the 
remaining loafers, locked the door, and hurried to the 
scene opposite. He was met by Mrs. Willis who had 
finished her work in the back room. Her new white 
shirtwaist made her face seem darker, her teether brown- 
er, but her eyes were shining with good nature. That 
she possessed the feminine art of persuasion was ap- 
parent, for in a few minutes Fleming was standing in 
the midst of the crowd, holding up a large white cake. 

"Ladies and gentlemen," he began. The laughing 
and talking continued. Someone shouted "silence !" 
The uproar subsided as one face after another turned to 
the young man, and finally ended with a "AA'ouldn't that 
jar you?" and a giggle from a young girl over in a 
corner, who was talking with a young man. 

"Ladies and gentlemen, I have in my hand a cake. 
There is some article in it known only to Mrs. AA'ilHs. 
Whoever guesses what this article is gets the cake. The 
guesses are five cents. Now let's have some guesses." 

"I guess a fish hook," said the book-keeper. Every- 
one laughed, Mrs. Willis as heartily as any, for she was 
an inveterate angler. 

"All right," said Fleming after he had put down the 
cake and had taken out his note book and pencil. "Any- 
one else have a guess?" 

"A nickel," "a bean," "a penny," "a grain of corn," 
the guesses came fast. The excited men crowded close. 
There was much confusion in recording guesses and 
making change. 

"A doll's apron," cried Glenna Searcy, holding high 
her nickel, while her face expressed intense interest. 

"A ring," "a thimble," "a thread," "a bit of wood," 
"a button," "a grain of cofifee," were shouted by others. 

"A tov bank," said Glenna. 



"A bead," "a potatoe," "a nutmeg," still the guesses 
came in scores. 

"A glass," said Glenna her voice hardly audible in 
the tumult. 

Fleming moved towards the girl. "What kind of 
a glass?" 

"A tumbler," she said excitedly. 

Mrs. A'Villis had stood watching the contest with 
interest. Her big- form shook with laughter as she 
noted the eagerness of the den and the mock desperation 
of some on seeing in Fleming's smiling- face that they 
had not guessed correctly. Fleming went to her, l)ut 
returned in a few minutes and said : 

"The cake has not yet been won. Mrs. Willis has 
suggested that, if there are no more guesses, the cake 
be raffled ofl:'." 

Then the confusion began again, but in a few min- 
utes the crowd began to disperse. The book-keejier 
had secured the cake by a lucky draw. 

As Mrs. Searcy started home with sober, disappoint- 
ed Glenna, she saw Mrs. A\"illis's face light up with 
satisfaction at some remark of Mrs. Kinzer in passing. 
She heard Mrs. AA'illis say: 

"Yes, Fm glad I made it. I guess it brought half 
the money made. Come to see me. Mis Kinzer. You 
haven't got anything to do. Looks like you could run 
down 'most any time. Come Junebug, lets go home. 
Fm nearly dyin' for a pinch of snuff." 

A moment later, Mrs. Searcy heard a young man 
call out from a cloud of tobacco to the book-keeper, who 
was' some distance away. 

"Heigh there! Morton. AA'hat was in that cake?" 

"A glass," came the startling answer from a mouth 



294 



stufted with cake. "Come over tomorrow. Ham. and 
we'll eat cake." 

The next morninL^" Airs. \\ illis was up early. She 
I)ut on an old felt hat of her husband's and went out to 
feed her chickens. 'J'he brii^ht sunshine promised a 
beautiful Sabbath, a day on which small parties of young- 
people would go off to other lumber camps on hand cars, 
and railroad ])icycles. Airs. \\'illis's honest face still 
wore the look of deep satisfaction it had worn the night 
l)efore. as she planned that she, Mrs. Searcy, and the 
two little girls would go in the afternon to hunt moun- 
tain-tea berries in the Riffe woods. Hut her e.\i)ression 
changed to proportionately great irritation when she 
found that the hogs had destroyed a nest of eggs just 
lead}' to hatch. 

■'] could just cr}!" she said, supposing Junia or 
someone was present to hear. "'This is the fourth hen 
tJiat's been broken up by them dirty hogs. The com];any 
ought to fence uj) these houses but the}"ll never do it. 
If the hogs ud come in our houses and li\-e they wouldn't 
care. Li\in' in a lumber camp ain't what it's cracked up 
to be. ()h. Airs. Searcy, just see what the hogs done. 
1 could just cry!" 

Mrs. Searcv had just got up. She had heard Mrs. 
Willis and h.ad come out. though her hair was tousled 
and there were p-uffy ridges under her eyes. Dissatis- 
faction with herself, indignation because she thought 
(ilenria had lieen mistreated, and uncertainty as to whom 
to blame had caused an almost sleepless night. Xow 
she came to a];ph- a carefully ])lanned test. 

"I sle])t hardl\- a wink last night." she began, look- 
ing at Airs. AN'illis. 

"Win. dearie?" The \exation ga\e place to kindly 
concern. 



Two deep wrinkles came !)etween Airs. Searcy's 
brows. She began mechanicall}- to pull out a l:)asting 
from the sleeve of her kimona as she said : 

"I thought you. would know al)out it. C.lenna was 
certainly cheated out of the cake last night, for she 
guessed exactl}- what was in it. The cliild cried herself 
nearly to death last night oxer the way Air. Fleming 
treated her. 1 don't understand it. for he's always 
seemed so fond of her. that I've sometimes thought he 
was in love with her. I'm certainly gi'ing to see him 
to-day and give him a good going over. He's acted 
mean about it." Airs. Searcy said these test words 
daringly. A glance at Airs, ^^'illis"s face, so free from 
trace of guilt, had almost convinced her that Fleming 
leallv was the guiltv one. l'>esides her friendshi]) for 
this bulky, uncultured Airs. Willis was now so incon- 
secpiential, that she was indifferent to the effect of her 
words. I'iUt she was almost frightened at the change 
that Cc'me in Airs. Willis. 

"Madam!" said Airs. Willis, "I made that cake. I 
put that glass in that cake. I decided it had not been 
guessed. Air. Fleming didn't have nothin' to do with it 
more than takin' the guesses. If you've got a quarrel 
to pick, go ahead. Aly back's broad and 1 can stand it I'' 
These were the words of outraged honesty, and assailed 
honor. There was anger, but no consciousness of guilt 
in the stern visage that confronted Airs. Searcy. 

Airs. Searcv trembled with anger, but she forced 
herself to say politely: "1 beg your i)ardon. Airs. \\'illis. 
T did not know it was your doings. I thought it was 
Air. Fleming's fault. Still, that doesn't change the mat- 
ter. Cdenna was cheated out of the cake." 

"Glenna guessed a tumbler! What wuz in it wuz 
a little glass belongin' to junia's toy water set. and it 



295 



had a gold ring around the top," panted Mrs. W'ilHs. 

Mrs. Searcy's eyes were becoming blacker and wild- 
er. A tinge of red was appearing in her dark face. She 
was very angry, but she lowered her voice on seeing 
Mrs. Kinzer in a pretty morning dress cross the veranda 
of the house on the slope. She responded with quiet 
dignity. 

"Glenna had that in mind, Mrs. A\^illis. She had 
heard you talk about your guess-cakes and she noticed 
you always put in something of Junia's. She was pretty 
smart about it. She guessed the cake all right." 

"She didn't guess it, or she'd a said just what it 
wuz," said Mrs. A\"illis, who was beginning to see the 
matter in a different light in spite of herself. The 
thought that in her desire to have her cake bring in 
more mone}-, she had been dishonest, did not improve 
her temper. She could never admit she was wrong, now. 
"She didn't say nothin' about it being a toy tumbler," 
added Mrs. AA'illis defensively. 

Mrs. Kinzer had left the verandah, Mrs. Searcy 
laughed scornfully. "The guessers would hardly be ex- 
pected to tell the exact size, color and smell of what 
they guessed. How absurd ! However, one could hard- 
ly expect any more of servant girls. I wish I'd never 
heard of the old ice cream supper ! I am sure I don't 
believe in guess-cakes and raffling things off. Mv 
church — " 

"Your church, oh, dear me!" putting her hand o\er 
her moutli as if to hide her merriment. "Your church! 
My church don't belie\e in opium habits neither." 

Mrs. AA'illis knew the weight of the blow she gave 
in thus alluding to Mrs. Searcy's secret. She knew that 
Mrs. Searcy was a victim of the carelessness of a physi- 
cian, slie knevv' that Mrs. Searcy had tried persistently 



to break the chains that bound her. Mrs. Willis in her 
anger forgot that she had once listened sympathetically 
to Mrs. Searcy's painful confession. She now chose to 
see only bad in the woman before her. Mrs. Searcy 
was deeply offended ; she turned and without uttering 
another word, walked into her cottage. 

Mrs. AVillis finished feeding her chickens and went 
into her kitchen. Her yellowish eyes were hard and 
her face was set in stern lines as she did her morning- 
work. She did not listen to Junia's childish talk, and 
the little girl went out to play. Mrs. AA'illis watched 
shar]:»ly while Glenna left the house and went down to 
the river bank, where Junia and some other little girls 
were playing. "She didn't guess it," she muttered. She 
saw Glenna pull her rush hat down over her face, which 
was red and swollen with weeping. She saw Junia smile 
and greet Glenna, she saw Glenna turn her head and 
make no response to any of the greetings. 

"Junia, come here." Mrs. AA'illis's voice rang out 
sharply. Tlie child came reluctantly. 

"Did Glenna speak to you?" 

Junia would not answer. 

"Junia, Mrs. Searcy has told Glenna not to speak to 
you," said Mrs. AVillis leaping to a wrong conclusion 
through a misinterpretation of Glenna's action. "You've 
spoke to her and done your part. Don't }-()U speak first 
next time." 

The little girls had been inseparable playmates. 
Junia began to sob. "I've not done anything to Glenna." 

"I know you haint. It's her ma's fault. Glenna's 
a sweet child," said Mrs. AA^illis with a momentary soft- 
ening- of her face. 

That afternoon. Mrs. Searcy drew a rocker out on 
her porch and sat in regal state reading a novel. She 



296 



lield her head vevy iTi.^ii. She looked little more th.an 
t\venty-h\e in lier blue dress. ]\Irs. Willis watched. 
.\fter a while. Airs. Searcy laid aside her hdnk and went 
\vith (ilenna td the house on the slojje. Mrs. Willis's 
face grew harder. She was \'ery lonely and much 
troul)led. hat she wuuld not admit it. "She'll tr_\- to yet 
in with .\lr>. Kinzer. now." thought Mrs. Willie. "I 
just ho])e Airs. Kinzer'll hnd out about the opium habit, 
but Kate Willis will be the last one to tell it." 

When Mr>. Willis was feeding her chickens that 
exening. a w indow was pushed up and Mrs. Searcy said 
in icy tones. 

"I wanted to tell }-ou. Mrs. Willis, that it wasn't 
the loss of the cake 1 cared for. There's cake that's 
setting around in this house now. that ne\-er will be 
eaten, for we don't care anything about cake." This 
approach had called for all the courage Mrs. Searcy 
could summon, for she had begun to fear the big woman. 
She had worried for fear the stor_\- would go about over 
the cam]) tliat she (piarrelled over the loss of tlie cake, 
and ])ride had conquered fear. "Jt was the way that 
Glenna was treated that angered me," she added. 

"Mrs. Searcy. I can see }'ou are wantin' to cpiarrel 
some more, but I'm too much of a ladv to cpiarrel with 
}ou. I can't e\er forget the way you'\e called me a 
cheat. I've lived in ten camys, I've lived in Tennessee. 
r\e lived in Xorth Carolina. I've lived in \'irginia, but 
I never wuz called a cheat until I came to Pine Fork. 
West X'irginia. and then it wuz b\- a woman named 
Aland Searcy. I'll always lo\'e (ilenna. but I hain't no 
more use inr vou. I wish I might never see you again." 

"I don't want you to love Glenna," snap])ed Airs. 
Searcv. as she jnit the window down. 

In the succeeding da}-s. Airs. Willis watched the 



ne.xt house \vith sly and constant \iligance. Observa- 
tion, interrogation, deduction, and analysis unduK exer- 
cised themselves inside her big skull. If a window blind 
were raised or lowered, she noted the change. If Airs. 
Searc}' sat on her p(U"ch at an unusual hoiu". Airs. \\ illis 
sought a moli\e. If Airs. Searc_\- lingered in con\ersa- 
tion with an\- woman of the camp. Airs. Willis found a 
reason. Airs. Willis's world was a little world and it 
was upside down. .\ll her kindh' tendencies v\-ere for 
the time dormant, and her heart was full of bitterness. 
She had liked Airs. Searcv and the (piarrel had made an 
aching \(iid. Few intimate friendshij-s die without ])ain. 

For many davs the cpiarrel was the ])rincii)al sid)- 
ject for gossijj. Airs. Willis discussed it with all the 
women. One da}- Airs. Grabell. tlie woman that lived 
across the alley, came to see Airs. Willis. 

■■The\' say that Airs. Searcy's sorry she said any- 
thing and wants to make up." she ventured. 

"Oh yes I I can tell a difference in her. She's not 
gettin" in with Airs. Kinzer as fast as she wanted to. 
She'd make u]) all right InU she's made her bed and 
she'll have to la\- on it." 

"Don't you think you orter make u]) and forget it?'' 

Mrs. Willis answered in an offended tone. "Xo 
ma'am. I don't. I might sometime forgive her, but I 
can't e\"er forget the way she's acted. I don't know 
that I could forgive her. for my heart's hard. I used 
to be a good woman. l)Ut when George got to doin' 
wrong, mv heart got bad. I guess I could get back, 
Init I've never done it. Mrs. Searcy 'II have it to answer 
to her God the way she's acted. I'm done with her." 

The other woman was silent awhile, but the subject 
was too interesting to be dropi)ed. "Airs. Searcy went 
to the ball at I^anther last night, didn't she?" 



297 



Mrs. Willis laughed heartily. "A dog would have 
been tickled at what I saw last night," she said getting 
up. "She forgot to pull down the blind before she dress- 
ed, and it was this — ,'" motioning as if powdering, "and 
this — " turning and twisting her big body as though 
seeing her reflection in a long glass, "and this — " work- 
ing her fingers among imaginary combs and puffs of 
hair. "I vow it beat all ! Old Jersey ud had to laugh," 
and Mrs. Willis sat down laughing heartily and wiping 
from the corners of her mouth some snuff that had 
escaped during her performance. 

When Mrs. Searcy's anger cooled, she sincerely 
regretted the cpiarrel, though she still thought Glenna 
had been mistreated. She wished the good will but not 
the intimacy renewed. Although there were no more 
words, not even a "Good Morning" or "H-ow do you do?" 
any accidental meeting with Mrs. Willis was very dis- 
agreeable, and living so near, encounters could not be 
avoided. And knowing Mrs. Willis's volubility and un- 
derestimating her sense of honor, she feared that her 
secret would be circulated through the camp and — 
horrible thought! — perhaps reach Mrs. Kinzer's ears. 
Mrs. Kinzer's opinion was now a matter of great con- 
sequence to Mrs. Searcy. To Mrs. AVillis's great jeal- 
ousy she went frequently to the house on the slope. 
Brought in contact with the attractive purity and refine- 
ment of Mrs. Kinzer, she desired more strongly than 
ever to break her chains, but she could not. She was 
always received kindly by Mrs. Kinzer, but to her great 
vexation was not accepted as an intimate friend. Mrs. 
Kinzer did not invite confidence and so the quarrel was 
never mentioned. However, Mrs. Kinzer heard about 
it through her servant and believed herself a remote 
cause in that she had suggested the ice cream supper. 



One day Mrs. Kinzer was sitting on her verandah, 
looking listlessly over the little white cottages, which 
to one of the buzzards sailing senerely in the blue sky 
must have had the appearance of eggs nestled in hay. 
The camp was a hive of industry. The continuous whir 
of machinery was borne out from the huge band mill up 
the river. Men were loading cars from the acres of 
neatly stacked planks. A train of heavy logs came 
rumbling out of the forest. There were occasional blasts 
on the hill opposite, where some foreigners were making 
a new log road. Mrs. Kinzer was more alien to the 
place than Avere the foreigners. 

She had not come to Pine Fork to work; she had 
not even come for the sake of breathing the mountain 
air fragrant with the breath of pines. She was there 
because her husband was one of the lumber company's 
best sujjerintendents and she was a Ruth. She knew 
that she was the subject of two very diverse opinions, 
for the faces of the women of the camp plainly said, 
"Luckv Mrs. Kinzer!" while the letters of her friends 
had "Poor Grace !" written between the lines. She was 
comfortable but lonely. Her interests were in the minds 
and hearts of the people of her class. Pine Fork was her 
Siberia. She longed for something to break the mo- 
ncjtony. 

Mrs. Kinzer had tried to read and had tried to paint, 
but had failed to become interested. Now she sat lazily 
enjoying the warmth of the sunshine. The sight of Mrs. 
AVillis starting ofT to the riA-er with fishing tackle re- 
called the quarrel. She had l)een in the camp long 
enough to know that antipathies, jealousies and quarrels 
were rampant among the women. Mrs. Kinzer felt 
pained. AV'ere these women not good enough to have 
the priceless boon of friendship? Would the breach 



298 



between Airs. Searcv and Mrs. Willis never he closed? 
Suddenly a hold thoui^ht Hashed into yonnL;" Airs. Kin- 
zer's mind. Was the ];lan too daring? 

The ne.\t day Airs. Kinzer was sitting in her cciol 
dimly lighted parlor. She uas unusually h-eautiful in a 
thin white dress. Her eyes were soft and luminous, 
her clieeks were a \ivid jiink, as she talked to the woman 
sitting straight and dignified on the sofa, and to the 
hulkv form in the big chair. Slie was apparenth- calm, 
but in reality \-ery ner\-ous. She had succeeded by a 
harmless stratagem in bringing tlie cpiondam friends to- 
gether, and was determined to carry her scheme to a 
successful end. Airs. Searcy responded to her tactful 
remarks with monosyllables and nervous laughter: Airs. 
A\'illis sat silent as if she were at her favorite pastime. 

As Airs. Kinzer talked. Airs. Searcy relaxed more 
and more. Airs. Kinzer became more at ease. She did 
not betray l)y word or look that she knew of the (|uarrel, 
she even left the two together while she gave some 
order to the servant. Her tact was exquisite. Her 
\oice with its tender rising inflection and soft liquid 
tones made an eloquent appeal for ]:ieace. She dre\\- 
them together .over i)hotographs of her friends, she 



showed them her ]jaintings. Ho|)e rose high. She con- 
fidentlv exjjected to see the two women lea\'e the house 
together \vith animosity ([uelled. Her silvery laughter 
was unrestrained, when Airs. Searcy became \ery respon- 
sive and even Airs. Willis was ])liant. 

.\ sup])er-bell tinkled. Airs. Kinzer, chatting gaily 
led the way into the dining room. Suddenly Airs. 
SearcN' screamed, and the next moment was lying pale 
and unconscious on the foor. 

When, after a long time she ojjened her eyes, she 
found Airs. Willis working to restore her. just as on 
that other occasion months before. I'ut this time — in 
s]Mte of an evident good intention — there was a look on 
that big s(|uare face and a repungance in the touch that 
caused Airs. Searcv to turn her head and groan. She 
iiad seen such an ex])ression when Airs. Willis li?d 
lu'ndled the cold wriggling earth-worms, and she knew 
that the touch was no more loving. Airs. Kinzer saw- 
it all and understood. All the vivid color left her 
cheeks. In stuml)ling around in the dark, she had ])ut 
her hands on the old corpse of a friendship — a friendship 
that could not live a^'ain. 




299 





300 





301 



i 



<^/!^^ F this Book meets with your approval it will be 
yojX? due in no small measure to the many excellent 
^^ drawings it contains. The editor wishes to ex- 
press his thanks to Mr. Tom Moore, Miss Pearl 
L.ouise Reiner, Mr. Fred R. Koelz, Mr. George 
]*>. Vieweg, and Miss Mary Alexander, the artists who 
have contri1)uted so large a share to the worth of this 
\olume. 



I 






y 



302 




303 




304 



<^m EMTir>- 




305 




306 



Fairmont Mining Hutchinson 



Machinery Co. 

FAIRMONT, W. VA. 




"LITTLE DEVIL" BOX CAR LOADER. 

It is difficult to even tackle and throw for a loss. The " Lit 
tie Devil " tackles Coal and throws for a gain of ten yards 



Fairmont Rotary Box Car Loaders 
for all sizes of Coal. 

CCMPLETECOAL MINING EQUIPMENTS. 



Coal Co. 



Fairmont^ West l/a. 



OPERATING THE FOLLOWING MINES: 

Hutchinson at Bryon, W. Va. 
Erie at Erie Mines, W. Va. 
Willard at Reynoldsville, W. Va 
Lindon at Mason City, W. Va. 
Kirkwood, at Bridgeport, Ohio. 



Shipments by Rail, Lake and Tide Water. 

Offices, 

PHILADELPHIA, CLEVELAND and 

DETROIT, MICH. 




tE:i)e ^niteli Wlooltn JJliUsi Co. 

Wed Virginia's Greatest Tailors. 

4J>1 O NC 



ALL SUITS 

ALL OVERCOATS 

Made to Order. Made to Fit. 



\LL WEST 



PRINCIPAL CITIES 




mm m 




Q^ 




Thoroughly modern 


instructions by specialists is 


given 


in the following subjects : 


Agriculture 


French Language 




Military Science 


Anatomy 


French Literature 




Mineralogy 


Astronomy 


Geology 




Mining Engineering 


Bacteriology 


German Language 




Music 


Bibical Literature 


German Literature 




Pathology 


Botany 


Grefk Language 




Philosophy 


Civil Engineering 


Greek Literature 




Physical Training 


Chemistry 


History 




Physics 


Commercial Branches 


Horticulture 




Physical Geography 


Dairying 


Italian Language 




Physiology 


Economics 


Italian Literature 




Political Science 


Education 


Latin Language 




Rhetoric 


Electrical Engineering 


Latin Literature 




Spanish Language 


English Language 


Law- 




Spanish Literature 


Elocution 


Mathematics 




Sociology 


Entomology 


Manual Training 




Sunday School Mds 


Fine Arts 


;\leclianical Engineering 


Veterinary Science 


Foresiry 


Medicine 




Zoology 



9^ 



If you are interested in any regular or special course, Collegiate, Professional, Technical, 
Preparatory, the state will be glad to serve you. Nearly thirteen hundred students enrolled this 
year. Summer school of six weeks from June 21 to July 31. 

Catalogue Sent free upon request and questions answered with pleasure by 

WAITMAN BARBE, or by D. B. PURINTON, Ph. D., LL. D. President, Morgantown, West Va. 



Stine's Lunch Room, 

"The Best What Aire." 
Everything to Eat. 

218 PLEASANT STREET H, D. TTINE, Prop. 



T. Wilbur Hennen 

Sllen's Siigh (Slass tailoring 



FAIRMONT, W. VA. 



A. J. CARTER, 



(^Parber ^f)op 



MORGANTOWN, V\ . VA. 



MANLEY HOLIE 

FAIRMONT, W. VA. 

L. B. C. DisTRiST Manager 



Yee Wing, 

WHITE STAR STEA/Vl LAUNDRY. 

HIGH CLASS WORK. ESPECIAL ATTENTION TO COLLAKS. 

426 HIGH STREET. 



THE CHANCELLOR 

PARKERSBURG, W. VA. 



Casey's 



Pharmacy 



Next, Door to Post Office. Morgantown, W. Va. 



Morgantown Bakery, 



PURE BREAD, BUNS, ROLLS, PlES, CAKES, 
AND FANCY GOODS. 



Both Phones. 



FRED ERD, Prop. 



Main Street. 



Livery, Sale ^^^ Feed Stables 



^^^^^HL- SI '* " " 



The Only Fireproof Hotel in the City 



Both Phones. 



48 WHARF STREET. 



MORGANTOWN, W. VA 



AMERICAN PLAN ONLY 



RATES, $2.50 to $4.00 



HIRSCHMAN'S 




THE STUDENTS HEADQUARTERS 

FOR THE PAST QUARTER 

OF A CENTURY 



The Home of the Finest 

Ready-to WearClothing 

in the State of West Va. 



OUTFIT I ERS FROH 
HEAD TO FOOT. 

HIRSC^MAN'S 

THE BIG STORE. 



ATLAS FLOUR 




Smith-Race 

Grocery Co. 

Wholesale DIstribtors. 



BOOKS STATIONERY 

WE LIKE THE STUDENTS 
THE STUDENTS LIKE US 

EMPIRE 

Book Store 

CORNER HIGH AND FAYETTE STS. 



^ 



Class Pins, Pennants, Music, 

Pictures, En§fraving of Cards, 

Invitations, etc., a Specialty, 

LOAF A LITTLE WITH US. 

Students Supplies. College Goods. 



The (has. H. Elhott 

(i 



The liarg-est College Engraving House 
in the World. 

Commencement Invitations 

Class Day Programs 

and Class Pins. 




Dance Programs & Invitations, 
Menus, Leather Dance Cases 
and Covers, Fraternity and Class 
Inserts for Annuals, Fraternity 
and Class Stationery. 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 
AND CALLING CARDS. 



Works: 



nth street and Leiiigli Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



RIIND ER CORE 



J*> 



For Outside or Indoor Men's Wear you will find Accessions for 

All Occasions at 



stein Block Clothing. 
Custom Made Clothing. 
Shirts to Order. 



Reiner &> Core's, 

"THE SPOT TO BUY." 





Knox 


Hats. 




Star 


Shirts. 


E 


S. W. 


Collars. 



F='or "Purity and Quality" 

Ice Cream, Ices and Candies 

ALWAYS REMEMBER 




NOTHING BUT THE BEST. 

Morgantown, - West Virginia 



C. L. BERGER &. SO\S, 



37 WILLIAMS ST 
Boston, Mass. 



Precise Eng-lneering: and Surveying- Instruments. 

They secure in their instruments : 
Accuracy of division, Simplicity in ma- 
nipulation, Lightness combined with 
strength. Achromatic telescopes, with 
high power. Steadiness of adjustment 
under varying temperatures, stiffness to 
avoid any tremor, even in a strong wind, 
and thorough workmanship in every 
part. 

These instruments are in general 
use by U. S. Government Engineers, 
Geologists and Surveyors. Their in- 
struments are made for River, Bridge, Harbor, City, Tun- 
nel, Railroad and Mining Engineering, as well as those made 
for Triangular or Topographical work and Land Surveying, 
etc., are more widely used than those of any other firm in 
the U. S. Illustrated 3fanual and Catalogue sent on Bequest. 




The Jacob Hutchinson Hardware Co 



WHOLESALE EXCLUSIVELY 



Hardware, 
Cements, 
Doors and 
Windows, 
Glass, Oils, 
Paints, 
Stoves, 
Ranges, 

Blacksmith's 
and Miner's 
Supplies, 




THE JACOB HUTCHINSON HARDWARE COIVIPANY. 



Reach 
Base Ball 
Supplies 
and 

Gillette 
Safety 
Safety 
Razors 

Quick Ship 
ments, Quicker 
Deliveries at 
Right Prices. 

FAIRMONT, WEST VA. 



vJ rye _/ 1 lingo 

is the place to get your Smoking 
Supplies and Drinks 



of All Kinds. 



Whenever you feel in need of a Snnoke drop 

in then come again to quench 

the dry throat. 



Capital $150,000. 

Geo. M. Jacobs, Pres. W.m. s. Raymond, 1st Vice Pres. 

H. J. Hartley, 2nd Vice Pies. .T. M. Brownpield, (Cashier. 

DIRECTORS : 



Geo. M. Jacobs, 

W. S. Mei-edith. 

r E. HutchiiiMin. 



VV. S. Haymond, 
Harry Shaw. 

Duncan Smelaii 



H. J. Hartley, 
G. E. Amos, 

H. R. Furbee. 



BANK Of mmmm 



THOMAS E. HODGES. PRESIDENT. 
M. L. BROWN, Cashier. 

Resources S400,000. 



Headquarters College and Frat Jewelry. 
JEWELER and OPTICIAN. 

:?14 HIGH STKKET, - - .MOKCiANTOVVN, W. VA. 

Fine Watch ReiDairina- and Engraving- a Specialty. 



BELL PHONE 101-L 



PEOPLES PHONE 139-J 



Depository for the State of 
West Virginia and the City of Morgantown. 



Your Business Cordially Solicited. 



S. G. CHADWICK, Jr.. Prop. 

Studt^nt's Rate. 

L F. EVEREIART . K. T. MANNING 

Student Agents. 



A. K PETTING 

MANUFACTURER OF 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 



213 NORTH LIBERTY STREET, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Memorandum Package sent to any Fraternity Number tlirougli the Secretary of the Chapter. 
Special Designs and estimates furnished on Class Pins, Rings, Medals for Athletic Meets, etc. 



AD. BOWER 



ED, BOWER 



BOWERS BARBER SHOP 

Farmer & Mechanics Bank Building 

^^B A T t^ iS^^ 







VA/ E I L 


' © 




The 


Home 


of HART SCHAFFNER 
Walk-Over Shoes for Men 


rnd MARX 
and Women. 


CLOTHES 


We 


make 


Clothes to suit you in our Tailoring 


Department. 






W E^ 1 I^ 


' S 




321 


High 


Street 


Morgantown, W. Va. 



Fairmont & Clarksburg Traction Company 

Fairmont to Clarksburg Every Hour, 



FARE 55c. 



ROUND TRIP $1.00 



x-afifiumji^- ' * ' f 




'^mm^-^-9BnM 



WE OFFER TO THOSE WHO EN 

JOY CLEAN RECREATION 

THESE ROOMS. 




THE 
COURT AMUSEMENT CO 

Two Floors, New Court Building. 

Corner Chancery Row and Chestnut Street. 

C. E. CASTO. Owner. 



The 

Consolidation 

Coal Co. 



Incorporated. 



Georges Creek Big Vein 
Cumberland. 

Fairmont By Product and 
Domestic. 

Somerset Smokeless Steam. 

Millers Creek Block Coals. 

EIGHTY-FIVE OPERATING MINES. 



7, ()(>(> Employees in We.st Virginia, 
inchiding Civil, Mining, Mechanical 
and Klectrical Engineers, Superin- 
tendents, Inspectors, Clerical Forces 
and Miners. 



Oflices Of West Virginia Division 



Fdirmont, West Va. 





„ F R I E N D „ 

^ ' The ' J 

Photographer 

J* 

221 PLEASANTS STREET, 
Morgantown, W. Va. 




THE OLYMPIA 

TOOL and 'BILLIA'R'D 
PA'RLO'R 

Is One of the Best Kquippcd in tliis Fart of the State. 
IF YOU DO NOT BELIEVE. COME AM) SEE 

Over Comuntzis Conftctionery Store. 



D. J, Comuntzis, Proprietor. 



ESTASLI5HED 1818 




lenlkmm'B f urniabing 

BROADW'V COR. TWENTY- SECOND ST. 

f:rvv VORI^. 

In addition to our assortment of Imported Suitings— the most extensive of its kind in the country— we invite 
attention to our very complete selection of Keady-Made Suits and Overcoats, out on distinctive lines. Our stock also 
affords Suitable Equipment for Motoring, Riding, Driving, Polo and the Hunt Also Requisites for the traveler. 
English Hats with many Novelties in Negligee shapes. Boots and Shoes. Men's Furnishing Goods, including many 
imported articles not to be found elsewliere in America. Our prices range from theijuite moderate to t. e more ex- 
pensive. Illustrated Catalogue on request. 



CHARLOTTESVILLE 

W OOLEN MIL LS 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 



m 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Hign-Grade Uniform Cloth for Army, Navy, Letter 
Carrier, Police and Railroad Purposes 



V 



And the Largest Assortment and Best Quality of 

Cadet Grays 

Including those used at the United States Military Academy at West Poiut, and other leadinj 

Military Schools of the Country. 

PRESCRIBED AND USED BY THE CADETS OF WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY. 



Second National Bank, 

Morgantown, W. Va. 
Capital $80,000. Surplus $90,000. 



Depository of The State 
of West Virginia. 



AAROM J. GARLAND, Pres. 

W. C. McGREW, Vice-Pres. 

W. E. ARNETT, Cashier. 

W. HARSHCRAFT, Asst. Cashier, 



John F. ihlif 




Second J^ationcxl 'BanK 'Btiilding^ 
M org ant Ota} n, 'W. \/ci. 



Yoiill Like It, Others Do. 

Ton, Ciin't Beat It Unless You Cheat. 



vJ avern 



AT THE DEPOT. 
F"airmont, - . - \A/e-st \/ii-ginia. 



TJivoiv 'Em, Over. 



Students' Patronage Solicited. 



Students* 
'Pre^^ing Shop 

The Student's* X5ailor4!, 

220 Wi I ley street. 

Owned by Students. We Do Cleaning and Mending- 



» 



Tire ©hta VnUtv Tublishiiui (En. 

frintcrs, iPublislurs nnil 
StatinnEvs. 

Tarlursbury, ^Urst ^a. 



. \a.a:.d^ri£: 1^e''?0()(oJ 









e -ta ft. «